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Acceptance and Commitment Therapy preceded by an experimental Attention Bias Modification procedure in recurrent depression: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299363
Source
Trials. 2018 Mar 27; 19(1):203
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Date
Mar-27-2018
Author
Tom Østergaard
Tobias Lundgren
Robert Zettle
Rune Jonassen
Catherine J Harmer
Tore C Stiles
Nils Inge Landrø
Vegard Øksendal Haaland
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Sørlandet Hospital, Arendal, Norway. tom.ostergaard@sshf.no.
Source
Trials. 2018 Mar 27; 19(1):203
Date
Mar-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Keywords
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attentional Bias
Depression - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Norway
Psychotherapy, Group
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Recurrence
Remission Induction
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
This project studies the effect of group-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) following Attention Bias Modification (ABM) on residual symptoms in recurrent depression. ACT is a cognitive-behavioral intervention combining acceptance and mindfulness processes with commitment and behavior-change processes. ACT enjoys modest empirical support in treating depression and has also shown promising results in secondary prevention of depression. The experimental cognitive bias modification (ABM) procedure has been shown to reduce surrogate markers of depression vulnerability in patients in remission from depression. The aim of the current project is to investigate if the effect of group-based ACT on reducing residual depressive symptoms can be enhanced by preceding it with ABM. Also, assessment of the relationship between conceptually relevant therapeutic processes and outcome will be investigated.
An invitation to participate in this project was extended to 120 individuals within a larger sample who had just completed a separate randomized, multisite, clinical trial (referred to hereafter as Phase 1) in which they received either ABM (n = 60) or a control condition without bias modification (n = 60). This larger Phase-1 sample consisted of 220 persons with a history of at least two episodes of major depression who were currently in remission or not fulfilling the criteria of major depression. After its inclusion, Phase-1 participants from the Sørlandet site (n = 120) were also recruited for this study in which they received an 8-week group-based ACT intervention. Measures will be taken immediately after Phase 1, 1 month, 2 months, 6 months, and 1 year after the conclusion of Phase 1.
This study sequentially combines acceptable, nondrug interventions from neuropsychology and cognitive-behavioral psychology in treating residual symptoms in depression. The results will provide information about the effectiveness of treatment and on mechanisms and processes of change that may be valuable in understanding and further developing ABM and ACT, combined and alone.
ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT02648165 . Registered on 6 January 2016.
PubMed ID
29587807 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coercive mental health care - dilemmas in the decision-making process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296843
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 08 21; 138(12):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
08-21-2018
Author
Torkil Berge
Kjersti Sunniva Bjøntegård
Petter Ekern
Martin Furan
Nils Inge Landrø
Grete J Sølvberg Larsen
Kåre Osnes
Inger Selvaag
Anne Helene Vedlog
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 08 21; 138(12):
Date
08-21-2018
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Decision-Making - ethics
Coercion
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Community Mental Health Centers
Emergency Services, Psychiatric
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Involuntary Treatment, Psychiatric - ethics
Mental health services
Norway
Patient Participation
Suicidal ideation
Abstract
The use of coercive mental healthcare contravenes the principle of voluntary examination and treatment. However, it should be possible for persons at acute risk to receive imperative health assistance.
After evaluating 37 emergency interviews in psychiatric outpatient clinics where the use of coercive mental health care was considered, interviews were conducted with emergency assistance staff.
The study includes interviews that resulted in involuntary hospitalisation (n = 15), coerced observation (n = 2), voluntary hospitalisation (n = 14) and follow-up by the outpatient clinic (n = 6). Important factors in assessing the use of coercion were the severity of psychotic symptoms, suicide risk and risk for others, and difficult social circumstances. Three-quarters of emergency assistance staff were in some degree of doubt, and 16 out of 37 experienced uneasiness during the assessment. With a view to enhancing the patient's perception of having been met with respect, the emergency assistance staff emphasised the need for the patient's opinion to be heard. Where the emergency assistance staff were in doubt, a number of professional and ethical issues were highlighted in the process of reaching a decision.
Latitude should be given for ethical and professional reflection in relation to assessing the use of coercion in daily clinical practice, as well as training in measures to reinforce patients' experience of participation during the interview.
PubMed ID
30132604 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cognition is only minimally impaired in Spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14): a neuropsychological study of ten Norwegian subjects compared to intrafamilial controls and population norm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105906
Source
BMC Neurol. 2013;13:186
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Iselin Marie Wedding
Jeanette Koht
Espen Dietrichs
Nils Inge Landrø
Chantal M E Tallaksen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Oslo, Norway. i.m.wedding@medisin.uio.no.
Source
BMC Neurol. 2013;13:186
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Executive Function
Family Health
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Memory
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Psychomotor Performance
Reference Values
Severity of Illness Index
Spinocerebellar Degenerations - complications
Visual perception
Young Adult
Abstract
There is an increasing awareness of the role of the cerebellum not only in motor, but also in cognitive and emotional functions. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14) is an autosomal dominant hereditary ataxia characterized by a relatively pure cerebellar phenotype. Cognitive impairment has been reported in studies with phenotype descriptions of SCA14, but previous studies have been small without control groups, and no homogeneous and systematic test panel has been used. The objective of this study was to thoroughly characterize the neuropsychological profile in ten Norwegian SCA14 subjects compared to unaffected family members and population norm data.
Ten SCA14 subjects and ten intrafamilial unaffected age- and education-matched controls from two Norwegian families were included. The unaffected intrafamilial controls included six first degree relatives, two second degree relatives, and two spouses. General intellectual ability, memory, visuoperceptive skills, psychomotor speed, executive functions, depression and anxiety were examined using internationally standardized tests, with minimal need for manual response to avoid motor bias.
No significant cognitive deficit was found in SCA14 subjects compared to intrafamilial controls. Verbal IQ, verbal executive function and psychomotor speed tended to be reduced in affected subjects, but previously reported non-verbal executive dysfunction was not confirmed in this study.
Only subtle cognitive impairment was found in SCA14 affected subjects. The current findings do not confirm earlier reports of cognitive dysfunction in SCA14, but does shows a mild impairment in specific verbal executive functions. Genotypic differences may partly account for this discrepancy, and further studies on larger materials are needed to verify the findings.
PubMed ID
24289098 View in PubMed
Less detail

Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS) compared to treatment as usual (TAU) for suicidal patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289676
Source
Trials. 2016 10 03; 17(1):481
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-03-2016
Author
Wenche Ryberg
Roar Fosse
Per Henrik Zahl
Inge Brorson
Paul Møller
Nils Inge Landrø
David Jobes
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Lier, Norway. Wenche.ryberg@vestreviken.no.
Source
Trials. 2016 10 03; 17(1):481
Date
10-03-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Checklist
Clinical Protocols
Cognition
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Mental health
Norway
Patient care team
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - methods
Research Design
Risk factors
Suicidal ideation
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS) is a therapeutic framework that appears promising to reduce suicidal ideation and suicidal cognition. CAMS has not previously been evaluated in a standard specialized mental health care setting for patients with suicidal problems in general. In this pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT) we will investigate if CAMS is more effective than treatment as usual (TAU) in reducing suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Effects will also be investigated on mental health and symptom relief in general and upon readmissions to inpatient units.
The study is a multicenter, observer-blinded, superiority, two-armed RCT which will include patients from four clinical departments at Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Norway. We aim to include 100 patients with moderate to strong suicidal problems, as defined by a score of 13 or more on Beck's Scale for Suicide Ideation - Current. Patients are included regardless of diagnosis. Randomization will be performed using a stratified four-block procedure with treatment unit as the stratification variable. The duration of treatment will vary depending on patients' needs and clinical assessments. Patients are interviewed by research staff at four checkpoints: baseline, 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. Central outcome measures are the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation - Current, Outcome Questionnaire - 45, and Suicide Attempt Self-Injury Count.
This pragmatic trial is effectuated within the Public Health Care System in Norway, where patients have multiple problems and diagnoses and therapists have a high work load. Results from this trial are highly generalizable to a typical everyday clinical setting, and one should expect similar results if CAMS is implemented in the future as a standard component in specialized mental health care systems.
Open Science Framework: DOI 10.17605/OSF.IO/JHRM2 . Registered 5 July 2015. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02685943 . Registered on 8 February 2016.
Notes
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Cites: Depress Anxiety. 2011 Nov;28(11):963-72 PMID 21948348
Cites: J Clin Psychol. 2006 Feb;62(2):161-70 PMID 16342292
Cites: Psychol Assess. 2015 Dec;27(4):1171-81 PMID 25894705
Cites: Am J Psychother. 2012;66(3):227-42 PMID 23091884
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Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1999 Dec;52(12):1143-56 PMID 10580777
Cites: Psychol Med. 2003 Apr;33(3):395-405 PMID 12701661
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 1998;59 Suppl 20:22-33;quiz 34-57 PMID 9881538
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Cites: Addiction. 1993 Jun;88(6):791-804 PMID 8329970
Cites: Addict Behav. 2012 Jan;37(1):36-41 PMID 21937169
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2015 Jan 12;:null PMID 25581595
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Cites: Bull Menninger Clin. 2009 Fall;73(4):339-54 PMID 20025428
Cites: J Psychol. 2005 Sep;139(5):439-57 PMID 16285214
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Aug 25;135(15):1342-3 PMID 26315231
Cites: Trials. 2014 May 29;15:194 PMID 24885904
Cites: BMJ. 2008 Nov 11;337:a2390 PMID 19001484
Cites: Contemp Clin Trials. 2009 Jan;30(1):40-6 PMID 18718555
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 1999 Spring;29(1):1-9 PMID 10322616
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2014 Feb 25;134(4):394 PMID 24569736
Cites: Depress Anxiety. 2016 Jun;33(6):520-30 PMID 26854478
Cites: Trials. 2009 Jun 03;10:37 PMID 19493350
PubMed ID
27716298 View in PubMed
Less detail

Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS) compared to treatment as usual (TAU) for suicidal patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289518
Source
Trials. 2016 10 03; 17(1):481
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-03-2016
Author
Wenche Ryberg
Roar Fosse
Per Henrik Zahl
Inge Brorson
Paul Møller
Nils Inge Landrø
David Jobes
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Lier, Norway. Wenche.ryberg@vestreviken.no.
Source
Trials. 2016 10 03; 17(1):481
Date
10-03-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Checklist
Clinical Protocols
Cognition
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Mental health
Norway
Patient care team
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - methods
Research Design
Risk factors
Suicidal ideation
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS) is a therapeutic framework that appears promising to reduce suicidal ideation and suicidal cognition. CAMS has not previously been evaluated in a standard specialized mental health care setting for patients with suicidal problems in general. In this pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT) we will investigate if CAMS is more effective than treatment as usual (TAU) in reducing suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Effects will also be investigated on mental health and symptom relief in general and upon readmissions to inpatient units.
The study is a multicenter, observer-blinded, superiority, two-armed RCT which will include patients from four clinical departments at Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Norway. We aim to include 100 patients with moderate to strong suicidal problems, as defined by a score of 13 or more on Beck's Scale for Suicide Ideation - Current. Patients are included regardless of diagnosis. Randomization will be performed using a stratified four-block procedure with treatment unit as the stratification variable. The duration of treatment will vary depending on patients' needs and clinical assessments. Patients are interviewed by research staff at four checkpoints: baseline, 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. Central outcome measures are the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation - Current, Outcome Questionnaire - 45, and Suicide Attempt Self-Injury Count.
This pragmatic trial is effectuated within the Public Health Care System in Norway, where patients have multiple problems and diagnoses and therapists have a high work load. Results from this trial are highly generalizable to a typical everyday clinical setting, and one should expect similar results if CAMS is implemented in the future as a standard component in specialized mental health care systems.
Open Science Framework: DOI 10.17605/OSF.IO/JHRM2 . Registered 5 July 2015. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02685943 . Registered on 8 February 2016.
Notes
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Jan;47(1):1-9 PMID 21052623
Cites: Psychother Res. 2014;24(4):504-13 PMID 24188797
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Aug 3;294(5):563-70 PMID 16077050
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 2011 Aug;58(8):A4300 PMID 21827722
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2010 Jan;61(1):25-31 PMID 20044414
Cites: Psychotherapy (Chic). 2012 Mar;49(1):72-80 PMID 22369081
Cites: Depress Anxiety. 2011 Nov;28(11):963-72 PMID 21948348
Cites: J Clin Psychol. 2006 Feb;62(2):161-70 PMID 16342292
Cites: Psychol Assess. 2015 Dec;27(4):1171-81 PMID 25894705
Cites: Am J Psychother. 2012;66(3):227-42 PMID 23091884
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1983 Mar;40(3):249-57 PMID 6830404
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1999 Dec;52(12):1143-56 PMID 10580777
Cites: Psychol Med. 2003 Apr;33(3):395-405 PMID 12701661
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 1998;59 Suppl 20:22-33;quiz 34-57 PMID 9881538
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Apr;62(4):427-32 PMID 15809410
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2015 May;172(5):441-9 PMID 25677353
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 1997 Nov;35(11):1039-46 PMID 9431735
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Jan 1-7;365(9453):82-93 PMID 15639683
Cites: Eur Addict Res. 2005;11(1):22-31 PMID 15608468
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006 Jul;63(7):757-66 PMID 16818865
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2009 Jun;39(3):307-20 PMID 19606922
Cites: Addiction. 1993 Jun;88(6):791-804 PMID 8329970
Cites: Addict Behav. 2012 Jan;37(1):36-41 PMID 21937169
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2015 Jan 12;:null PMID 25581595
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2012 Dec;42(6):640-53 PMID 22971238
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 2010 May 15;177(1-2):228-34 PMID 20178887
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Jan 14;170(3):149-53 PMID 18208732
Cites: BMJ. 2009 Jun 29;338:b2393 PMID 19564179
Cites: Bull Menninger Clin. 2009 Fall;73(4):339-54 PMID 20025428
Cites: J Psychol. 2005 Sep;139(5):439-57 PMID 16285214
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Aug 25;135(15):1342-3 PMID 26315231
Cites: Trials. 2014 May 29;15:194 PMID 24885904
Cites: BMJ. 2008 Nov 11;337:a2390 PMID 19001484
Cites: Contemp Clin Trials. 2009 Jan;30(1):40-6 PMID 18718555
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 1999 Spring;29(1):1-9 PMID 10322616
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2014 Feb 25;134(4):394 PMID 24569736
Cites: Depress Anxiety. 2016 Jun;33(6):520-30 PMID 26854478
Cites: Trials. 2009 Jun 03;10:37 PMID 19493350
PubMed ID
27716298 View in PubMed
Less detail

The extent of neurocognitive dysfunction in a multidisciplinary pain centre population. Is there a relation between reported and tested neuropsychological functioning?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115716
Source
Pain. 2013 Jul;154(7):972-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Nils Inge Landrø
Egil A Fors
Lindis L Våpenstad
Øyvor Holthe
Tore C Stiles
Petter C Borchgrevink
Author Affiliation
National Competence Centre for Complex Symptom Disorders, St. Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. n.i.landro@psykologi.uio.no
Source
Pain. 2013 Jul;154(7):972-7
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analgesics, Opioid - therapeutic use
Chronic Pain - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Pain Clinics - statistics & numerical data
Pain Measurement - drug effects - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Statistics as Topic
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Patients with chronic nonmalignant pain syndromes frequently report cognitive dysfunction, in particular with respect to concentration and attention. Such complaints have, in general, been attributed to depressive symptoms. In this study we showed that cognitive complaints in chronic pain patients are significantly associated with objective test performance in the area of inhibitory control after partialling out degree of depressive symptoms. Furthermore, about 20% of the patients performed below cut-off for clinically significant impairment on tests of basic neurocognitive functioning. A larger proportion of patients with generalized and neuropathic pain performed below this cut-off, whereas patients with localized pain exhibited impaired function to a lesser degree. Chronic pain patients receiving opioids did not perform worse than patients off opioid treatment. Systematic assessment of basic neurocognitive functions in centres treating chronic pain patients is warranted.
Notes
Comment In: Pain. 2013 Jul;154(7):964-523659915
Comment In: Pain. 2014 Mar;155(3):645-624296358
Comment In: Pain. 2014 Mar;155(3):646-724333947
PubMed ID
23473784 View in PubMed
Less detail

Frequency and characteristics of recurrent major depressed patients with unimpaired executive functions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45662
Source
World J Biol Psychiatry. 2005;6(1):36-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Kirsten I Stordal
Astri J Lundervold
Arnstein Mykletun
Arve Asbjørnsen
Eva Biringer
Jens Egeland
Asa Hammar
Nils Inge Landrø
Atle Roness
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Kjetil Sundet
Anders Lund
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Medicine, Section of Psychiatry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. kirsten.irene.stordal@helse-bergen.no
Source
World J Biol Psychiatry. 2005;6(1):36-44
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aptitude
Cognition Disorders - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Intelligence
Male
Mathematical Computing
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Prognosis
Psychometrics
Recurrence
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Major depression is associated with impairment of cognitive functions, and especially higher-order cognitive processes referred to as executive functions (EF). Whether this is a general finding is unclear. Patients without EF impairment may have different treatment needs than patients with EF impairment, and will probably have a better everyday functioning. Thus, it is important to identify the prevalence and characteristics of depressed patients without EF impairment. Forty-three patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (19-51 years) and 50 healthy controls were included in the study. The subjects were assessed with neuropsychological tests selected to measure central areas of EF, and screened on clinical and demographic variables. Within the depressed group, a total of 56% were defined as EF unimpaired. These patients were characterised by higher intellectual abilities and fewer depression episodes than the subgroup of patients with EF impairment. The subgroups were similar in age at debut of illness, severity of depression, general psychopathology and global level of functioning. In conclusion, about half of patients with recurrent major depression have normal EF. Since cognitive impairment and depressive symptomatology seem to be distinct dimensions, a neuropsychological investigation could help to ensure optimal treatment in patients with recurrent major depression.
PubMed ID
16097404 View in PubMed
Less detail

More rumination and less effective emotion regulation in previously depressed women with preserved executive functions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263781
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2014;14:334
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Martin Aker
Catherine Harmer
Nils Inge Landrø
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2014;14:334
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Depressive Disorder, Major - psychology
Emotions
Executive Function
Female
Humans
Inhibition (Psychology)
Internal-External Control
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Task Performance and Analysis
Thinking
Young Adult
Abstract
Major depressive disorder is associated with very high recurrence rates, and specific vulnerability factors that increase the risk for repeated episodes should be identified. Impaired executive functions have repeatedly been found in remitted populations. The current study included both neutral and emotional executive tasks, and we expected to find impaired performance in unmedicated previously depressed women compared to controls. Furthermore, we hypothesized that the executive functions inhibition and shifting would be related to the ability to apply cognitive reappraisal and to avoid unhealthy rumination.
Inhibition and shifting data derived from neutral and emotional computerized tasks, and questionnaire data on emotion regulation and trait rumination, were obtained from previously depressed (n = 109) and never-depressed women (n = 64) and analyzed in independent samples t-tests. A logistic regression analysis investigated the ability of emotion regulation and rumination to predict depression vulnerability. The associations of executive functions to emotion regulation and rumination were investigated in a series of linear regression analyses. Participants on psychotropic medication were excluded from all analyses of executive performance.
Previously depressed participants, the majority of which had experienced recurrent episodes, matched control participants on both neutral and emotional executive tasks. However, significantly more rumination and expressive suppression, and less cognitive reappraisal, were found in the previously depressed group. Executive function was unrelated to rumination and emotion regulation in this sample.
Previously depressed women whose executive function was intact were characterized by ruminative tendencies and more frequent use of expressive suppression. Trait rumination and expressive suppression are known to increase depression risk, but were unrelated to executive functions in this population. This indicates that unhealthy emotion regulation strategies may be targeted directly in preventive interventions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25427967 View in PubMed
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The neuropsychological profile of children, adolescents, and young adults with anorexia nervosa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126194
Source
Arch Clin Neuropsychol. 2012 May;27(3):329-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Kristin Stedal
Mark Rose
Ian Frampton
Nils Inge Landrø
Bryan Lask
Author Affiliation
Regional Eating Disorders Service, Oslo University Hospital Ullevål, Norway. kristin.stedal@ulleval.no
Source
Arch Clin Neuropsychol. 2012 May;27(3):329-37
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aging
Anorexia Nervosa - complications
Child
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Executive Function
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Intelligence Tests
International Cooperation
Male
Memory - physiology
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway
Verbal Behavior
Visual perception
Young Adult
Abstract
The neuropsychological profile of a sample of 155 patients with a clinical diagnosis of anorexia nervosa was assessed using a test battery specifically developed for such patients. The current findings suggest that the patients display a common neuropsychological profile including both strengths and weaknesses when compared with published norms. The patients displayed good verbal fluency skills, but performed poorly on tests of visuospatial memory, associated with relatively weak central coherence. They were within the average range on the assessment of executive functioning except for one measure of set-shifting. This study provides a valuable point of reference for clinicians when considering treatment options.
PubMed ID
22414676 View in PubMed
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Polymorphisms of the BDNF gene show neither association with multiple sclerosis susceptibility nor clinical course.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126906
Source
J Neuroimmunol. 2012 Mar;244(1-2):107-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Inger-Lise Mero
Cathrine Smestad
Benedicte A Lie
Åslaug R Lorentzen
Leiv Sandvik
Nils Inge Landrø
Jan H Aarseth
Kjell-Morten Myhr
Elisabeth G Celius
Hanne F Harbo
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, N-0407 Oslo, Norway. i.l.mero@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Neuroimmunol. 2012 Mar;244(1-2):107-10
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor - genetics
Disease Progression
Female
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Methionine - genetics
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - genetics
Norway - epidemiology
Polymorphism, Genetic
Valine - genetics
Abstract
Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed a protective role in multiple sclerosis (MS) in several studies. The val(66)met polymorphism alters the function of the BDNF protein, and has along with rs56164415 previously been reported to be associated with MS. We genotyped BDNF SNPs val(66)met and rs56164415 in 2149 Norwegian MS patients and 2747 healthy controls. No association was found for any of the SNPs to disease susceptibility or any clinical or demographic parameters including sex, age at onset, disease course, disease severity and cognitive impairment.
PubMed ID
22341604 View in PubMed
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