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Abstention, alcohol use and risk of myocardial infarction in men and women taking account of social support and working conditions: the SHEEP case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9623
Source
Addiction. 2003 Oct;98(10):1453-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Anders Romelsjö
Maria Branting
Johan Hallqvist
Lars Alfredsson
Niklas Hammar
Anders Leifman
Anders Ahlbom
Author Affiliation
Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs, Stockholm, Sweden. anders.romelsjo@sorad.su.se
Source
Addiction. 2003 Oct;98(10):1453-62
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIMS: Very few studies indicating that low-moderate alcohol consumption protects from myocardial infarction (MI) controlled for social support and working conditions, which could confound the findings. Therefore, a first aim was to study the risk of non-fatal and total MI in relation to volume of alcohol consumption and measures of social support and working conditions. A second aim was to analyse the impact of the volume of earlier alcohol use in abstainers. DESIGN: Data came from a case-control study, the Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program (SHEEP), including first MI among Swedish citizens 45-70 years old. SETTING: Stockholm County 1992-94. PARTICIPANTS: There were 1095 cases of MI in men and 471 in women (928 and 372 were non-fatal), and 2339 living controls from the general population. MEASUREMENT: Information about alcohol use at different periods in life and job strain, social anchorage and life control besides pre-existing health problems, smoking, physical activity, socio-economic status and marital status was obtained by a questionnaire from the cases and the controls. FINDINGS: In multivariate logistic regression analyses, the relative risk for MI (especially non-fatal) was reduced among alcohol consumers. RR for non-fatal MI was 0.52 (95% confidence intervals 0.32, 0.85) in men with a consumption of 50-69.9 g 100% ethanol/day and 0.21 (95% confidence interval 0.06, 0.77) in women with a consumption of 30 g or more per day (reference category 0.1-5 g 100% ethanol/day). Men who were abstainers during the previous 1-10 years and with an earlier average consumption of 5-30 g 100% ethanol/day had a significantly lower relative risk compared to such abstainers with an earlier higher consumption. Earlier consumption among abstainers may also have an impact on gender differences in MI. Analyses showed positive interaction between abstention and low life-control in women, but only 4% of the female cases were due to this interaction. There were no other interactions between measures of alcohol use and social anchorage, life control and working situations. CONCLUSION: Alcohol use had a protective impact on MI, with little impact of job strain, social anchorage and life control, giving increased support for a protective impact of low-moderate alcohol use. The level of previous alcohol consumption among male 1-10-year-long abstainers influenced the risk of MI.
PubMed ID
14519183 View in PubMed
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[A certain increase of skin cancer among pilots].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184428
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2003
Author
Niklas Hammar
Harald Eliasch
Anette Linnersjö
Bo-Göran Dammström
Maritha Johansson
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Enheten för epidemiologi, Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. niklas.hammar@imm.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Date
Jun-26-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - manpower
Aircraft
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2278-912872371
PubMed ID
12872376 View in PubMed
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Acute kidney injury after coronary artery bypass grafting and long-term risk of myocardial infarction and death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258575
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2014 Mar 1;172(1):190-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2014
Author
Linda Rydén
Staffan Ahnve
Max Bell
Niklas Hammar
Torbjörn Ivert
Ulrik Sartipy
Martin J Holzmann
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2014 Mar 1;172(1):190-5
Date
Mar-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - mortality
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - mortality
Creatinine - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - metabolism - mortality - surgery
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Acute kidney injury (AKI) after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is associated with early mortality. Its impact on the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) over time and long-term mortality has not been well described.
We performed a nationwide population-based cohort study in 27,929 patients who underwent a first isolated CABG between 2000 and 2008 in Sweden. Acute kidney injury was divided into three categories based on the absolute increase in postoperative serum creatinine (sCr) concentration compared with the preoperative baseline: stage 1, sCr increase of 0.3 to 0.5mg/dL; stage 2, sCr increase of >0.5 to 1.0mg/dL and stage 3, sCr increase of = 1.0mg/dL.
The overall incidence of postoperative AKI was 13%, 6.3% met the criterion for stage 1, 4.3% for stage 2 and 2.3% for stage 3. During a mean follow-up of 5.0 years, there were 2119 (7.6%) MIs and 4679 (17%) deaths. Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals for MI were 1.35 (1.15 to 1.57), 1.80 (1.53 to 2.13) and 1.63 (1.29 to 2.07), in AKI stages 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The corresponding hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 1.30 (1.17 to 1.44), 1.65 (1.48 to 1.83) and 2.68 (2.37 to 3.03), respectively.
Our results show that AKI after CABG is associated with an increased long-term risk of MI and death.
PubMed ID
24502882 View in PubMed
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Acute kidney injury following coronary artery bypass grafting: early mortality and postoperative complications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127103
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Apr;46(2):114-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Linda Rydén
Staffan Ahnve
Max Bell
Niklas Hammar
Torbjörn Ivert
Martin J Holzmann
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden. Linda.Ryden-Lujan@karolinska.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Apr;46(2):114-20
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - blood - etiology - mortality
Aged
Confidence Intervals
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - mortality
Creatinine - blood
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Mediastinitis - etiology
Odds Ratio
Postoperative Complications - blood - etiology - mortality
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Stroke - etiology
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To investigate the prognostic importance of acute kidney injury on early mortality, postoperative stroke, and mediastinitis in patients undergoing a first isolated coronary artery bypass grafting.
7594 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with information on pre- and postoperative serum-creatinine values were included. Patients were classified using the Acute Kidney Injury Network classification. Odds ratios (OR) for mortality and postoperative complications within 60 days of surgery were calculated after adjustment for confounders separately for stage 1 and for stages 2 and 3 together.
1047 (14%) patients developed acute kidney injury. There were 132 (1.7%) deaths, 103 (1.4%) strokes and 118 (1.6%) cases of mediastinitis during follow-up. Among patients in stage 1 the adjusted odds ratio for death was 4.36 (95% confidence interval 2.83-6.71) and for stage 2 plus 3; 21.5 (12.0-38.6) compared to patients without acute kidney injury. Corresponding OR for stroke were 2.34 (1.43-3.82) and 6.52 (2.97-14.3) and for mediastinitis 2.88 (1.84-4.50) and 4.68 (2.07-10.6), respectively.
Acute kidney injury following coronary artery bypass grafting is related to postoperative mortality, stroke, and mediastinitis. Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting should be assessed for presence of acute kidney injury postoperatively, in order to predict early prognosis.
PubMed ID
22324648 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and the incidence of type 2 diabetes: a 20-year follow-up of the Finnish twin cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183513
Source
Diabetes Care. 2003 Oct;26(10):2785-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Sofia Carlsson
Niklas Hammar
Valdemar Grill
Jaakko Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Stockholm Centre of Public Health, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. sofia.carlsson@imm.ki.se
Source
Diabetes Care. 2003 Oct;26(10):2785-90
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Body mass index
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Questionnaires
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate alcohol consumption in relation to the incidence of type 2 diabetes.
The study population consisted of 22778 twins of the Finnish Twin Cohort. This cohort was compiled in 1975 and includes all same-sexed twins born in Finland before 1958. Information on alcohol, smoking, diet, physical activity, medical, and social conditions was obtained by questionnaires administered in 1975, 1981, and 1990. By record linkage to national registers of hospital discharge and prescribed medication, 580 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were identified during 20 years of follow-up.
Moderate alcohol consumption (5-29.9 g/day in men and 5-19.9 g/day in women) tended to be associated with a reduced incidence of type 2 diabetes compared with low consumption (or=25.0 kg/m(2)) subjects (relative risk 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-1.0 [men]; 0.6, 0.3-1.1 [women]). High alcohol consumption (>or=20 g/day) was associated with an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes in lean women (2.9, 1.1-7.5) but not in overweight women or in men. In women, binge drinking was associated with an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes (2.1, 1.0-4.4). Analyses of alcohol-discordant twin pairs supported a reduced risk in moderate consuming twins compared with their low-consuming cotwins (odds ratio 0.5, 95% CI 0.2-1.5).
The results of this study suggested that moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, binge drinking and high alcohol consumption may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes in women.
PubMed ID
14514580 View in PubMed
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Assessment of alcohol consumption by mailed questionnaire in epidemiological studies: evaluation of misclassification using a dietary history interview and biochemical markers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184136
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2003;18(6):493-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Sofia Carlsson
Niklas Hammar
Paula Hakala
Jaakko Kaprio
Jukka Marniemi
Tapani Rönnemaa
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Stockholm Centre of Public Health, Stockholm, Sweden. sofia.carlsson@imm.ki.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2003;18(6):493-501
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Biological Markers
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Self Disclosure
Sensitivity and specificity
Transferrin - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
gamma-Glutamyltransferase - blood
Abstract
Self-reported information on alcohol from questionnaires is generally assumed to introduce misclassification of consumption, mainly in the direction of underestimation. The aim of this study was to evaluate self-reported information on alcohol consumption from a mailed questionnaire by comparing to a dietary history interview and biochemical markers of alcohol intake.
For 76 male twin pairs of the Finnish Twin Cohort Study aged 40-70 years information on self-reported alcohol consumption was collected through mailed questionnaire and dietary history interview. Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT), Gamma-glutamyltransferase (Gamma-GT) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were determined from blood samples.
Mean levels of CDT, gamma-GT and MCV showed a rise with increased self-reported alcohol consumption already at low levels of reported consumption ( or = 30 g/day) there was no such correlation. The questionnaire had sensitivity of 28-43% and specificity of 89% for identification of high consumers of alcohol using the biochemical markers as reference and sensitivity 41% and specificity 94% using the dietary history interview as reference. Sensitivity was improved when information on binge drinking (82%) or possible drinking problems (73%) was considered.
Comparison to dietary history interview as well as to biochemical markers indicate that self-reported information on alcohol consumption from a mailed questionnaire may be used to distinguish between groups with different levels of alcohol consumption. The suggested misclassification of high consumers implies that only strong associations between high alcohol intake and disease are likely to be detected in studies based on questionnaire data.
PubMed ID
12908714 View in PubMed
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Association between baseline serum glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol, and prostate cancer risk categories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279405
Source
Cancer Med. 2016 06;5(6):1307-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
06-2016
Author
Rhonda Arthur
Henrik Møller
Hans Garmo
Lars Holmberg
Pår Stattin
Håkan Malmstrom
Mats Lambe
Niklas Hammar
Göran Walldius
David Robinson
Ingmar Jungner
Mieke Van Hemelrijck
Source
Cancer Med. 2016 06;5(6):1307-18
Date
06-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood glucose
Cholesterol - blood
Comorbidity
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Grading
Neoplasm Staging
Population Surveillance
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - pathology
Registries
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Lifestyle-related risk factors such as hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia have been associated with several cancers. However, studies exploring their link with prostate cancer (PCa) clinicopathological characteristics are sparse and inconclusive. Here, we investigated the associations between serum metabolic markers and PCa clinicopathological characteristics. The study comprised 14,294 men from the Swedish Apolipoprotein MOrtality RISk (AMORIS) cohort who were diagnosed with PCa between 1996 and 2011. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to investigate the relation between glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol and PCa risk categories, PSA, Gleason score, and T-stage. Mean age at time of PCa diagnosis was 69 years. Men with glucose levels >6.9 mmol/L tend to have PSA20 µg/L compared to PSA 4.0-9.9 µg/L. Hypertriglyceridemia was also positively associated with PSA>20 µg/L. Hyperglycemic men had a greater odds of intermediate- and high-grade PCa and advanced stage or metastatic PCa. Similarly, hypertriglyceridemia was positively associated with high-grade PCa. There was also a trend toward an increased odds of intermediate risk localized PCa and advanced stage PCa among men with hypertriglyceridemia. Total cholesterol did not have any statistically significant association with any of the outcomes studied. Our findings suggest that high serum levels of glucose and triglycerides may influence PCa aggressiveness and severity. Further investigation on the role of markers of glucose and lipid metabolism in influencing PCa aggressiveness and severity is needed as this may help define important targets for intervention.
PubMed ID
26923095 View in PubMed
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The association between individual metabolic syndrome components, primary liver cancer and cirrhosis: A study in the Swedish AMORIS cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285950
Source
Int J Cancer. 2017 Sep 15;141(6):1148-1160
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2017
Author
Paul Nderitu
Cecilia Bosco
Hans Garmo
Lars Holmberg
Håkan Malmström
Niklas Hammar
Göran Walldius
Ingmar Jungner
Paul Ross
Mieke Van Hemelrijck
Source
Int J Cancer. 2017 Sep 15;141(6):1148-1160
Date
Sep-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - blood - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - blood
Female
Humans
Lipids - blood
Liver Cirrhosis - blood - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which may progress to cirrhosis, a significant risk factor of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the commonest malignant primary liver cancer (PLC). We investigated the association between the individual components of MetS (lipids, apolipoproteins, raised glucose, diabetes and obesity), PLC and cirrhosis. A total of 509,436 participants from the Swedish AMORIS cohort, recruited between January 1985 and December 1996 (end-date December 2011), aged =20 with baseline triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), glucose and liver enzymes were included. Those with baseline benign liver tumours, PLC or cirrhosis were excluded. Multivariate Cox regression, adjusted for age, gender, socio-economic status, liver disease (excluding cirrhosis) and MetS factors were used to estimate the association with PLC and cirrhosis. There were 766 PLC and 2,775 cirrhosis cases over 13 years. Raised TG, low TC, raised glucose, diabetes and low HDL were associated with an increased risk of developing PLC and cirrhosis. ApoB/ApoA-I ratio were also associated with PLC, whilst low LDL, raised TG/HDL, low ApoA-I and low ApoB were associated with cirrhosis. Obesity was significantly associated with PLC but not cirrhosis. Raised TG, low TC, raised glucose and diabetes showed stronger associations with PLC in participants with cirrhosis but many participants developed PLC without cirrhosis. Individual components of MetS (lipids, apolipoproteins, raised glucose, diabetes and obesity) were associated with an increased risk of developing PLC or cirrhosis. MetS components were more strongly associated with PLC with preceding cirrhosis history but many participants developed PLC without cirrhosis.
PubMed ID
28577304 View in PubMed
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Association between levels of C-reactive protein and leukocytes and cancer: three repeated measurements in the Swedish AMORIS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137306
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 Mar;20(3):428-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Mieke Van Hemelrijck
Lars Holmberg
Hans Garmo
Niklas Hammar
Göran Walldius
Elisa Binda
Mats Lambe
Ingmar Jungner
Author Affiliation
Cancer Epidemiology Group, Division of Cancer Studies, School of Medicine, King's College London, 3rd Floor, Bermondsey Wing, Guy's Hospital, London SE1 9RT, United Kingdom. mieke.vanhemelrijck@kcl.ac.uk
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 Mar;20(3):428-37
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Leukocytes - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - blood
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Abstract
To study levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and leukocytes, as inflammatory markers, in the context of cancer risk.
From the Apolipoprotein MOrtality RISk (AMORIS) study, we selected 102,749 persons with one measurement and 9,273 persons with three repeated measurements of CRP and leukocytes. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was applied to categories of CRP (50 g/L) and quartiles of leukocytes. An inflammation-based predictive score (IPS) indicated whether someone had CRP levels of more than 10 mg/L combined with leukocytes of more than 10×10(9)/L. Reverse causality was assessed by excluding those with less than 3, 5, or 7 years of follow-up. To analyze repeated measurements of CRP and leukocytes, the repeated IPS (IPSr) was calculated by adding the IPS of each measurement.
In the cohort with one measurement, there was a positive trend between CRP and risk of developing cancer, with the lowest category being the 0.99 (0.92-1.06), 1.28 (1.11-1.47), 1.27 (1.09-1.49), and 1.22 (1.01-1.48) for the second to fifth categories, respectively. This association disappeared when excluding those with follow-up of less than 3, 5, or 7 years. The association between leukocytes and cancer was slightly stronger. In the cohort with repeated measurements, the IPSr was strongly associated with cancer risk: 1.87 (1.33-2.63), 1.51 (0.56-4.06), and 4.46 (1.43-13.87) for IPSr=1, 2, and 3 compared with IPSr=0. The association remained after excluding those with follow-up of less than 1 year.
Our large, prospective cohort study adds evidence for a link between inflammatory markers and cancer risk by using repeated measurements and ascertaining reverse causality.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21297038 View in PubMed
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Association between serum calcium concentration and risk of incident and fatal cardiovascular disease in the prospective AMORIS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287875
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2016 Aug;251:85-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Sabine Rohrmann
Hans Garmo
Håkan Malmström
Niklas Hammar
Ingmar Jungner
Göran Walldius
Mieke Van Hemelrijck
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2016 Aug;251:85-93
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Calcium - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - diagnosis
Cohort Studies
Colorimetry
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Serum Albumin - analysis
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Previous epidemiological studies have shown positive associations between serum calcium concentration and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but results differ by definition of CVD. We examined the association of circulating calcium with incident and fatal CVD, myocardial infarction (MI), and stroke in the Swedish AMORIS cohort.
We included 441,738 participants of the AMORIS database linked for follow-up information on morbidity and mortality. Concentrations of total calcium were fully automated measured using a colorimetric method; concentrations of albumin were measured with a bromocresol green method between 1985 and 1995. The association of albumin-corrected calcium concentration and risk of incident and fatal CVD, MI, and stroke, respectively, was assessed with multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazards models.
Until December 31, 2011, during a median follow-up time of 21 years, 90,866 incident cases of CVD, 21,271 of MI, and 25,810 of stroke were identified. High serum calcium concentrations were associated with increased risk of non-fatal CVD (Hazard ratio [HR] = 1.12, 95% CI 1.10-1.14, top [=2.40 nmol/L] vs. bottom [=2-25 nmol/L] quintile), MI (1.19, 1.14-1.25), and stroke (1.11, 1.06-1.15) and fatal disease (CVD: 1.41, 1.35-1.47; MI: 1.41, 1.31-1.51; stroke: 1.30, 1.20-1.41). Effect modification by sex was observed for incident disease such that associations were stronger among women than men. Serum calcium was positively associated with both incident and fatal ischemic stroke and with fatal hemorrhagic stroke, but not with incident hemorrhagic stroke. In a sub-groups analysis, the results remained significant after adjustment for smoking.
The results support a modest positive association between serum calcium and risk of CVD, but the underlying mineral metabolism and the exact mechanisms are currently unclear.
PubMed ID
27289190 View in PubMed
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56 records – page 1 of 6.