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Association between early lead exposure and externalizing behaviors in adolescence: A developmental cascade.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302836
Source
Environ Res. 2019 Nov; 178:108679
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2019
Author
Mireille Desrochers-Couture
Yohann Courtemanche
Nadine Forget-Dubois
Richard E Bélanger
Olivier Boucher
Pierre Ayotte
Sylvaine Cordier
Joseph L Jacobson
Sandra W Jacobson
Gina Muckle
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Québec, Québec, Canada.
Source
Environ Res. 2019 Nov; 178:108679
Date
Nov-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Lead (Pb) exposure is associated with adverse neurological development. Most notably, it has been observed through externalizing behavior symptoms, as observed among Inuit children from northern Québec. Evidence for a persistent neurological impact of early Pb exposure later in life is however scarce. Pb exposure may initiate a developmental cascade that increases the risk of long-term behavior problems.
Testing for direct associations between childhood Pb concentrations and adolescent externalizing symptoms and substance use, as well as indirect associations through childhood behavior assessments.
The study sample is a longitudinal cohort of Inuit children (n?=?212) followed since birth. Blood Pb concentrations were measured during childhood (median age?=?11.4 years) and adolescence (median age?=?18.5 years). Externalizing/inattentive behavior were teacher-assessed through the Teacher Report Form and the Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale for children. At the adolescence follow-up, behavior problems were self-reported by filling Achenbach's Youth Self-Report, the Barkley Adult ADHD-IV Rating Scale, and the Diagnostics Interview Schedule for Children. Adolescent substance use was also self-assessed through the DEP-ADO. Direct and indirect associations of child Pb concentrations with adolescent outcomes were tested through mediation models.
Child blood Pb concentrations were not directly associated with any adolescent outcomes. On the contrary, childhood Pb exposure was indirectly associated, through childhood externalizing behavior assessments, with adolescent externalizing behaviors, binge drinking, and cannabis use. These indirect associations held after controlling for adolescents' concurrent Pb blood concentrations.
Our results highlight the indirect but lasting effects of child Pb exposure on adolescent behavior problems, and the importance of childhood externalizing behavior in this relationship. Adverse early-life environment put children on a riskier developmental trajectory, increasing their likelihood of lifelong psychological, social and health problems.
PubMed ID
31454729 View in PubMed
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Associations between prenatal cigarette smoke exposure and externalized behaviors at school age among Inuit children exposed to environmental contaminants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258359
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2013 Sep-Oct;39:84-90
Publication Type
Article
  1 document  
Author
Caroline Desrosiers
Olivier Boucher
Nadine Forget-Dubois
Eric Dewailly
Pierre Ayotte
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Gina Muckle
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada; Centre de recherche du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec City, Québec, Canada.
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2013 Sep-Oct;39:84-90
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
63846
Keywords
Attention - drug effects
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - chemically induced - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - chemically induced - psychology
Child
Drug Interactions
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Lead Poisoning, Nervous System, Childhood - blood - psychology
Male
Mercury Poisoning, Nervous System - blood - psychology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - psychology
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
Smoking during pregnancy is common among Inuit women from the Canadian Arctic. Yet prenatal cigarette smoke exposure (PCSE) is seen as a major risk factor for childhood behavior problems. Recent data also suggest that co-exposure to neurotoxic environmental contaminants can exacerbate the effects of PCSE on behavior. This study examined the association between PCSE and behavior at school age in a sample of Inuit children from Nunavik, Qu?bec, where co-exposure to environmental contaminants is also an important issue. Interactions with lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg), two contaminants associated with behavioral problems, were also explored.
Participants were 271 children (mean age=11.3years) involved in a prospective birth-cohort study. PCSE was assessed through maternal recall. Assessment of child behavior was obtained from the child's classroom teacher on the Teacher Report Form (TRF) and the Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale (DBD). Exposure to contaminants was assessed from umbilical cord and child blood samples. Other confounders were documented by maternal interview.
After control for contaminants and confounders, PCSE was associated with increased externalizing behaviors and attention problems on the TRF and higher prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) assessed on the DBD. No interactions were found with contaminants.
This study extends the existing empirical evidence linking PCSE to behavioral problems in school-aged children by reporting these effects in a population where tobacco use is normative rather than marginal. Co-exposure to Pb and Hg do not appear to exacerbate tobacco effects, suggesting that these substances act independently.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23916943 View in PubMed
Documents
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Associations between sleep-wake consolidation and language development in early childhood: a longitudinal twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132590
Source
Sleep. 2011 Aug;34(8):987-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Ginette Dionne
Evelyne Touchette
Nadine Forget-Dubois
Dominique Petit
Richard E Tremblay
Jacques Y Montplaisir
Michel Boivin
Author Affiliation
Research Unit on Children’s Psychosocial Maladjustment, Montreal, Canada. Ginette.Dionne@psy.ulaval.ca
Source
Sleep. 2011 Aug;34(8):987-95
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Language Development
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Quebec
Sleep - genetics - physiology
Twins - genetics
Abstract
The objectives were (1) to assess associations between sleep consolidation at 6, 18 and 30 months and language skills at 18, 30, and 60 months; and (2) to investigate the genetic/environmental etiology of these associations.
Longitudinal study of a population-based twin cohort.
1029 twins from the Quebec Newborn Twin Study.
Sleep consolidation was derived from parental reports of day/night consecutive sleeping durations. Language skills were assessed with the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory at 18 and 30 months and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test at 60 months. The day/night sleep ratio decreased significantly from 6 to 30 months. The 6- and 18-month ratios were negatively correlated with subsequent language skills. Children with language delays at 60 months had less mature sleep consolidation at both 6 and 18 months than children without delays and those with transient early delays. Genetic and regression analyses revealed that the sleep ratio at 6 months was highly heritable (64%) and predicted 18-month (B = -0.06) and 30-month language (B = -0.11) mainly through additive genetic influences (R(Gs) = 0.32 and 0.33, respectively). By contrast, the sleep ratio at 18 months was mainly due to shared environment influences (58%) and predicted 60-month language (B = -0.08) through shared environment influences (R(Cs) = 0.24).
Poor sleep consolidation during the first 2 years of life may be a risk factor for language learning, whereas good sleep consolidation may foster language learning through successive genetic and environmental influences.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21804661 View in PubMed
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Early child language mediates the relation between home environment and school readiness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150613
Source
Child Dev. 2009 May-Jun;80(3):736-49
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nadine Forget-Dubois
Ginette Dionne
Jean-Pascal Lemelin
Daniel Pérusse
Richard E Tremblay
Michel Boivin
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Quebec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada.
Source
Child Dev. 2009 May-Jun;80(3):736-49
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child Behavior
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Housing
Humans
Infant
Male
Reading
Schools
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Twin Studies as Topic
Twins - genetics - psychology
Abstract
Home environment quality is a well-known predictor of school readiness (SR), although the underlying processes are little known. This study tested two hypotheses: (a) child language mediates the association between home characteristics (socioeconomic status and exposure to reading) and SR, and (b) genetic factors partly explain the association between language and SR. Data were collected between 6 and 63 months in a large sample of twins. Results showed that home characteristics had direct effects on SR and indirect effects through child language. No genetic correlation was found between language and SR. These results suggest that home characteristics affect SR in part through their effect on early language skills, and show that this process is mainly environmental rather than genetic in nature.
PubMed ID
19489900 View in PubMed
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Epidemiological portrait of behavior problems within an Inuit sample of school-aged Nunavik children: preliminary report

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284421
Source
Pages 254-255 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):254-255
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Gabrielle Begin
Sandra W. Jacobson
Nadine Forget-Dubois
Jocelyne Gagnon
Eric Dewailly
Pierre Ayotte
Joseph L. Jacobson
Gina Muckle
Author Affiliation
Universite Laval, Quebec, QC, Canada
Centre de recherche du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec (CHUO), Quebec, QC, Canada
Departement of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, The Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA
Source
Pages 254-255 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):254-255
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Abstract
The Inuit of Nunavik experience a variety of psycho-social problems that tend to compromise optimal child development. Among these problems are teenage pregnancy, domestic violence, alcohol abuse, as well as a suicide rate that is among the highest in the world. Both internalising behavioral problems (IBP) and externalising behavioral problems (EBP) can appear very early in development and can lead to sustained trajectories of delinquency, criminality, rejection by peers, depression and anxiety. IBP include symptoms of anxiety, depression and social withdrawal or rejection, whereas EBP take the form of impulsive, delinquent or aggressive behaviors. Objective This research project seeks to document the presence of behavior problems (BP) among school-aged Inuit in Nunavik and to examine their link with psycho-social risk factors to which the children are exposed.
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Exposure to organochlorines and mercury through fish and marine mammal consumption: associations with growth and duration of gestation among Inuit newborns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116195
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Apr;54:85-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Renée Dallaire
Éric Dewailly
Pierre Ayotte
Nadine Forget-Dubois
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Gina Muckle
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, Laval University and CHUQ Research Center, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Apr;54:85-91
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fetal Blood - metabolism
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Hair - metabolism
Hexachlorobenzene - blood
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mammals
Mercury - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Pregnancy
Quebec
Seafood - statistics & numerical data
Water Pollutants, Chemical - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Several studies have reported negative associations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and mercury (Hg) with duration of gestation and fetal growth in fish eating populations. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from fish, seafood and marine mammal intake has been reported to be positively related with pregnancy duration and fetal growth. So far, it remains unclear, however, if the associations of environmental contaminants (ECs) with growth are direct or mediated through their relation with the duration of gestation and the degree to which DHA intake during pregnancy attenuates the negative association of ECs with fetal growth.
To investigate direct and indirect associations of in utero exposure to ECs with fetal growth and pregnancy duration while taking into account the possible positive effects of DHA.
Pregnant Inuit women (N=248) from Arctic Quebec were recruited and cord blood samples were analyzed for PCBs, HCB, Hg and DHA. Anthropometric measurements were assessed at birth. Path models were used to evaluate direct and indirect associations.
Cord concentrations of PCB 153, HCB and Hg were significantly associated with shorter duration of pregnancy (ß varying from -0.17 to -0.20, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
23422685 View in PubMed
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Genetic and environmental influences on daytime and nighttime sleep duration in early childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113554
Source
Pediatrics. 2013 Jun;131(6):e1874-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Evelyne Touchette
Ginette Dionne
Nadine Forget-Dubois
Dominique Petit
Daniel Pérusse
Bruno Falissard
Richard E Tremblay
Michel Boivin
Jacques Y Montplaisir
Author Affiliation
Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Sacré-Coeur Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Pediatrics. 2013 Jun;131(6):e1874-80
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Environment
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Quebec
Sleep - genetics - physiology
Sleep Disorders - genetics
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Abstract
To determine the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors on daytime and nighttime continuous sleep duration at 6, 18, 30, and 48 months of age, and to identify different subgroups of children who followed different daytime and nighttime sleep duration trajectories and to investigate their etiology.
The current study included 995 twins (405 monozygotic and 586 dizygotic) of the Quebec Newborn Twin Study recruited from the birth records of the Quebec Statistics Institute. Daytime and nighttime sleep was assessed through maternal reports at 6, 18, 30, and 48 months of age. A semiparametric modeling strategy was used to estimate daytime and nighttime sleep duration trajectories. Quantitative genetic models were used to examine to what extent genetic and environmental factors influenced daytime and nighttime continuous sleep duration.
Genetic modeling analyses revealed environmental influences for all daytime sleep duration trajectories. In contrast, strong genetic influences were found for consolidated nighttime sleep duration (except at 18 months and for the short-increasing sleep duration trajectory).
This is the first indication that early childhood daytime sleep duration may be driven by environmental settings, whereas the variance in consolidated nighttime sleep duration is largely influenced by genetic factors with a critical environmental time-window influence at ~18 months.
PubMed ID
23713101 View in PubMed
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Growth in Inuit children exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls and lead during fetal development and childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260234
Source
Environ Res. 2014 Oct;134:17-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
  1 document  
Author
Renée Dallaire
Éric Dewailly
Pierre Ayotte
Nadine Forget-Dubois
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Gina Muckle
Source
Environ Res. 2014 Oct;134:17-23
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
556835
Keywords
Child
Environmental Exposure
Female
Growth - drug effects
Humans
Inuits
Lead - toxicity
Male
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - toxicity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Because of their geographical location and traditional lifestyle, Canadian Inuit children are highly exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and lead (Pb), environmental contaminants that are thought to affect fetal and child growth. We examined the associations of these exposures with the fetal and postnatal growth of Inuit children.
We conducted a prospective cohort study among Inuit from Nunavik (Arctic Québec). Mothers were recruited at their first prenatal visit; children (n=290) were evaluated at birth and at 8-14 years of age. Concentrations of PCB 153 and Pb were determined in umbilical cord and child blood. Weight, height and head circumference were measured at birth and during childhood.
Cord blood PCB 153 concentrations were not associated with anthropometric measurements at birth or school age, but child blood PCB 153 concentrations were associated with reduced weight, height and head circumference during childhood. There was no association between cord Pb levels and anthropometric outcomes at birth, but cord blood Pb was related to smaller height and shows a tendency of a smaller head circumference during childhood.
Our results suggest that chronic exposure to PCBs during childhood is negatively associated with skeletal growth and weight, while prenatal Pb exposure is related to reduced growth during childhood. This study is the first to link prenatal Pb exposure to poorer growth in school-age children.
PubMed ID
25042032 View in PubMed
Documents
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Heritability of response inhibition in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138143
Source
J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2011 Mar;17(2):238-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Russell J Schachar
Nadine Forget-Dubois
Ginette Dionne
Michel Boivin
Philippe Robaey
Author Affiliation
Neurosciences and Mental Health Programme, Research Institute and the Department of Psychiatry, The Hospital for Sick Children & University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. russell.schachar@sickkids.ca
Source
J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2011 Mar;17(2):238-47
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Behavior - physiology
Cohort Studies
Environment
Female
Humans
Inhibition (Psychology)
Male
Models, Genetic
Neuropsychological Tests
Reaction Time - genetics
Twins
Abstract
We report the heritability of response inhibition, latency, and variability, which are potential markers of genetic risk in neuropsychiatric conditions. Genetic and environmental influences on cancellation and restraint, response latency, and variability measured in a novel variant of the stop signal task were studied in 139 eight-year-old twin pairs from a birth cohort. Cancellation (50%), restraint (27%), and response latency (41%) showed significant heritability, the balance being non-shared environmental influences and/or error. Response variability was not heritable, with 23% of the variance attributable to shared environmental influences and 77% to non-shared environmental risk or error. The phenotypic correlation between response cancellation and restraint was -.44 and between response latency and restraint was .21. These phenotypic correlations were entirely genetic in origin. The phenotypic correlation between response variability and % successful inhibition was .27, but was not genetic. Cancellation and restraint were heritable and shared genetic influences, indicating that they may be influenced by a common gene or genes. Response latency was moderately heritable and shared genetic influences with restraint, but was not correlated with cancellation. Response variability was not heritable. These results support the potential of response inhibition and latency as endophenotypes in genetic research.
PubMed ID
21205410 View in PubMed
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Household overcrowding and psychological distress among Nunavik Inuit adolescents: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299312
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1541395
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Camille Pepin
Gina Muckle
Caroline Moisan
Nadine Forget-Dubois
Mylène Riva
Author Affiliation
a School of Psychology , Laval University , Québec , Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1541395
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Crowding - psychology
Depression - ethnology
Female
Housing
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Poverty - psychology
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - ethnology - psychology
Suicidal ideation
Abstract
About half of Nunavik Inuit live in overcrowded households compared to very few Canadians from the general population. Living in overcrowded households is associated with greater risks of suffering from mental health problems for Canadian adolescents. The present work aims at studying prospectively the hypothesised relationship between household overcrowding at childhood and psychological distress during adolescence among Nunavik Inuit, as well as the hypothesised relationship between these phenomena when they are both measure at adolescence. Recruited as part of the Nunavik Child Development Study, 220 participants were met at 11 years old in average and then when they were 18 years old in average. Household overcrowding was assessed using the people per room ratio. Psychological distress symptoms were operationalised at adolescence using depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts. The results did not show that childhood household crowding had a long-term effect on psychological distress. An absence of moderation by sex of the association was also found in the present study. Despite those results, household crowding could be a risk factor only when in interaction with other elements related with poverty or housing or could be experienced as a difficulty for adolescents on other aspects than depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts.
PubMed ID
30384821 View in PubMed
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