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Difficulties in using interpreters in clinical encounters as experienced by immigrants living in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281583
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2016 Jun;25(11-12):1721-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Ferid Krupic
Mikael Hellström
Mirza Biscevic
Sahmir Sadic
Nabi Fatahi
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2016 Jun;25(11-12):1721-8
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Communication Barriers
Cultural Competency
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multilingualism
Physician-Patient Relations
Primary Health Care
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Translating
Abstract
To study a group of immigrants' experiences regarding interactions with primary health care through an interpreter.
Approximately, 230 million people are resettled outside of their own home country. Thus, more than 3% of the world's population are migrants. It is a major challenge for health care providers to satisfy immigrants' needs for individualised health care services.
Qualitative study.
Focus group interviews were conducted with four groups of immigrants (n = 24) from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo and Somalia. The group interviews were audio recorded, transcribed and analysed, and the text was categorised using the content analysis method.
Participants' expectations of the interpreter-mediated consultations were high, but not always fulfilled. Interpreters being late, lacking professionalism or lacking knowledge in medical terminology and the use of health care professionals or relatives as interpreters were some of the problems raised.
A well-organised, disciplined interpreter service with professional and competent interpreters is needed to overcome problems regarding clinical consultations involving interpreters. A satisfactory language bridge has a significant impact on the quality of communications.
Interpreter services should be well organised, and interpreters should be linguistically, culturally and socially competent, as these factors may have a significant impact on consultation outcomes. Using relatives or staff as interpreters can sometimes be a solution but often results in an unsatisfactory clinical consultation.
PubMed ID
26879885 View in PubMed
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Experiences of Kurdish war-wounded refugees in communication with Swedish authorities through interpreter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99023
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2010 Feb;78(2):160-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Nabi Fatahi
Lena Nordholm
Bengt Mattsson
Mikael Hellström
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, 413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden. nabi.fatahi@allmed.gu.se
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2010 Feb;78(2):160-5
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Communication Barriers
Cultural Characteristics
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Iran - ethnology
Language
Male
Physician-Patient Relations
Refugees - psychology
Sweden
Translating
War
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study experiences of war-wounded Kurdish refugees with respect to cross-cultural communication through interpreters. METHOD: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten men, aged 31-42. Content analysis was used for analysis and interpretation of data. RESULT: War-wounded Kurdish refugees experienced a number of difficulties regarding communication through interpreters, mainly related to the insufficient language link to the Swedish authorities, particularly health care personnel. In many instances, interpreters were selected based on the immigrant's citizenship rather than mother tongue, leading to a more complex, tri-lingual interpretation situation. Differences in cultural background, fear, suspicion and lack of confidence in interpreters were addressed as other problems by the participants. CONCLUSION: Interpreter competence and patient confidence in the interpreter are essential for an adequate cross-cultural health communication. Assignment of interpreters should be based on knowledge of the patient's/client's mother tongue, rather than citizenship, and the outcome is improved by a common ethnic and cultural background of interpreter and patient/client. Our study should be considered as a pilot study, and the results should be validated in larger cohorts as well as in other ethnic and language groups. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: In order to minimize communication misunderstandings, complicated tri-lingual interpretation situations should be avoided. Interpreters should ideally be assigned according to patient's/client's mother tongue rather than citizenship. Interpreters' competence and patient's/client's confidence in interpreter may have significant impact on communication outcome.
Notes
RefSource: Patient Educ Couns. 2010 Feb;78(2):139-40
PubMed ID
19375263 View in PubMed
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Factors Beyond the Language Barrier in Providing Health Care to Immigrant Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290461
Source
Med Arch. 2016 Feb; 70(1):61-5
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Nabi Fatahi
Ferid Krupic
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Med Arch. 2016 Feb; 70(1):61-5
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication Barriers
Delivery of Health Care - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Europe
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology
Humans
Iraq
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Social Perception
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
Due to the enormous migration as the result of war and disasters during the last decades, health systems in Europe are faced with various cultural traditions and both healthcare systems and healthcare professionals are challenged by human rights and values. In order to minimize difficulties in providing healthcare services to patients with different cultural backgrounds, cultural competence healthcare professionals are needed.
Four focus group interviews, were conducted with Kurdish immigrants in Scandinavian countries (N=26). The majority were males (n=18) aged between 33-61 years (M= 51.6 years) and a few were (n=8) females aged 41-63 years (M=50.7 years). The data were analyzed by using qualitative content analysis method.
According to the study results participants experienced that diversities both in culture and healthcare routines create a number of difficulties regarding contact with healthcare services. Though culture related aspects influenced the process of all contact with health care services, the obstacles were more obvious in the case of psychological issues. The results of the study showed that cultural diversities were an obvious reason for immigrants' attitudes regarding healthcare services in resettlement countries.
The results of the study revealed a number of difficulties beyond linguistic problems regarding immigrants' contact with healthcare services in Scandinavian countries. Problems were rooted both in diversities in healthcare services and cultural aspects. Immigrants' views of healthcare systems and healthcare professionals' approach in providing healthcare were some of the problems mentioned.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26980935 View in PubMed
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The impact of knowledge and religion on organ donation as seen by immigrants in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294244
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2017 Dec; 31(4):687-694
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Ferid Krupic
Arkan S Sayed-Noor
Nabi Fatahi
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2017 Dec; 31(4):687-694
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Child
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Religion
Sweden
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Abstract
Transplantation of organs is one of the most successful medical advances of the past 60 years and transplantation is the treatment of choice for severe organ failure worldwide. Despite this situation, and the general acknowledgement of organ donation as a global priority, demand for organs outstrips supply in virtually every country in the world.
The aim of the study was to elucidate factors that influence immigrant's decisions regarding organ donation.
Data were collected through three group interviews using open-ended questions and qualitative content analysis. 32 participants, 16 men and 16 women from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Somalia, Lebanon and Kosovo participated in focus group interviews (FGI).
Analysis of the collected data resulted in two main categories: 'Information about organ donation' and 'Religious aspects of organ donation and a number of subcategories'. Some of the influencing factors concerning organ donation were mainly related to limited information from society as well as limited information from healthcare professionals. Religious aspects, fear and prejudices about organ donation were other factors that mentioned by participants as hamper regarding organ donation.
In order to improve immigrants' attitude towards organ donation, information about this issue and identification of the hampering factors, particularly culturally related factors such as the religious aspect, is essential. In this context, different intervention studies are needed to increase monitories groups' attitude towards organ donations.
PubMed ID
27500584 View in PubMed
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Interpreters' experiences of general practitioner-patient encounters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70565
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2005 Sep;23(3):159-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Nabi Fatahi
Bengt Mattsson
Jasaf Hasanpoor
Carola Skott
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Sweden. nabi.fatahi@allmed.gu.se
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2005 Sep;23(3):159-63
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Communication
Cultural Characteristics
Emigration and Immigration
Family Practice
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Physician's Role
Physician-Patient Relations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - ethnology
Translating
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study interpreters' experiences of problems in cross-cultural communication with special regard to the general practitioner (GP)-patient encounter. DESIGN: A focus-group interview with authorized interpreters was carried out. A phenomenographic method was used in the analysis. SETTING: Primary health care. RESULTS: The interpreters displayed a number of problems mainly related to the difficulty in balancing the triad relation (GP-patient-interpreter), the role of the interpreter in relation to other healthcare staff, the time aspects of the translation procedure, and the problems of diverse health beliefs and cultural inequalities. CONCLUSION: The interpreters notice a set of difficulties that need to be highlighted in order to improve consultations with cross-cultural GP-patient encounters.
PubMed ID
16162468 View in PubMed
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Migrant General Practitioners' Experiences of Using Interpreters in Health-care: a Qualitative Explorative Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295090
Source
Med Arch. 2017 Feb; 71(1):42-47
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Ferid Krupic
Kristian Samuelsson
Nabi Fatahi
Olof Skoldenberg
Arkan S Sayed-Noor
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Med Arch. 2017 Feb; 71(1):42-47
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication Barriers
Cultural Competency - organization & administration
Emigrants and Immigrants
Europe, Eastern
Female
Focus Groups
Foreign Medical Graduates
General practitioners
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physician-Patient Relations
Primary Health Care - methods
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Translating
Abstract
According to the UNHCR, 250 million people currently live outside their country of birth. The growing multicultural population poses a major challenge to healthcare professionals who aim to provide individualized, holistic care, which respects the individual's autonomy. To ensure basic rights, healthcare interventions should be guided by the value of benefiting others; individuals should be treated honestly, equally, and impartially.
To investigate immigrant doctors' experiences of using interpreters in the Swedish health-care system.
Twenty-eight doctors, 12 men and 16 women from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia and Serbia participated in four focus group interviews (FGI). The interviews were audio recorded, transcribed and analyzed using content analysis method.
The best results in the present study were achieved in situations where a professional interpreter was involved. In some cases, the doctors were forced to use relatives or a colleague to interpret, which in many cases proved to be a mistake. The consequences of poor interpretation routines included payment by mistake, a patient paying an interpreter who refused to interpret, time spent waiting for another interpreter, as well as disturbances to the daily work schedule. Finding someone who could replace an interpreter who did not show up caused time shortage and increased stress.
Improved routines and more effective cooperation between interpreting services and health-care centers are needed in order to ensure that using professional interpreters guarantees appropriate, high quality care. Improvements are needed to provide satisfactory health-care to people with limited language skills. In order to achieve this, better education of interpreters is needed, especially regarding cultural diversity and medical terminology. These improvements present complex challenges, deserving empirical and critical reflection in order to improve the work situation for doctors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28428673 View in PubMed
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Nurse radiographers' experiences of communication with patients who do not speak the native language.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99398
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Apr;66(4):774-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Nabi Fatahi
Bengt Mattsson
Solveig M Lundgren
Mikael Hellström
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Sweden. nabi.fatahi@allmed.gu.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Apr;66(4):774-83
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication Barriers
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse Practitioners - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Radiography - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
AIM: This paper is a report of a study exploring nurse radiographers' experiences of examining patients who do not speak the native language. BACKGROUND: The increased number of immigrant patients in Western countries poses a challenge to healthcare staff, as mutual understanding is needed in encounters with patients who do not speak the language of the host country. In particular, little is known about the quality of communication in the setting of radiological examinations, i.e. short encounters with demanding technical and caring components. METHODS: Three focus group interviews with experienced nurse radiographers (n = 11) were carried out in 2007. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. A qualitative content analysis method was applied to analyse the interview texts. FINDINGS: Four main categories emerged in the analysis: modes, needs, quality and improvements of interpreting. The need for an interpreter is strongly associated with the type of examination. For interventional procedures and contrast-enhanced examinations, a professional interpreter is required to inform the patient and to identify and handle side effects and complications. Friends, relatives, particularly children, and staff as interpreters were not considered ideal as an alternative. Shortage of time and lack of specific knowledge about radiological procedures were identified as problems with professional interpreters. Interpreter training and checklists specific for radiology department routines were suggested, as well as improved nurse radiographers' education on intercultural communication. CONCLUSION: The need for an interpreter, and the native tongue of the patient, should be clearly stated on the radiology request form, to allow timely scheduling of an interpreter. Intercultural communication in nurse radiographers' education should be enhanced.
PubMed ID
20423365 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.