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[Attitudes of Danish patients to scientific ethical questions. An interview study of therapeutic trials]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74273
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1983 Oct 10;145(41):3171-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-1983

Clinical estimation of the duration of pregnancy in legal abortion--are doctors biased by their knowledge of the duration of amenorrhoea?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65656
Source
Methods Inf Med. 1984 Apr;23(2):96-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1984

Clinical experience with a new device that will simplify insulin injections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48874
Source
Diabetes Care. 1985 Jan-Feb;8(1):73-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
A S Berger
N. Saurbrey
C. Kühl
J. Villumsen
Source
Diabetes Care. 1985 Jan-Feb;8(1):73-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Trials
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Injections - instrumentation
Insulin - administration & dosage
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
In order to test clinically a newly developed, simple, and convenient device for giving multiple injections of short-acting insulin (Actrapid HM, Novo, Bagsvaerd, Denmark), 16 type I diabetic patients previously stabilized on intensified conventional therapy regimens participated in a randomized crossover study for a period of 6 wk. The patients used conventional syringes for injections of short-acting insulin during one period and the new device during the other. Conventional syringes were used for injections of basal insulin during both periods. Metabolic control was assessed by twice-weekly blood glucose profiles, HbA1c, and the frequency of hypoglycemic reactions; no significant differences were found during the two treatment periods. No infections at the injection sites were seen. Patients' evaluation of the new device was very positive.
PubMed ID
3882371 View in PubMed
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Danish patients' attitudes to scientific-ethical questions. An interview study focusing therapeutic trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241010
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1984;215(2):99-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
N. Saurbrey
J. Jensen
P. Elmegaard Rasmussen
T. Gjørup
H. Guldager
P. Riis
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1984;215(2):99-104
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Clinical Trials as Topic
Denmark
Disclosure
Ethics Committees, Clinical
Ethics Committees, Research
Ethics, Medical
Female
Humans
Informed consent
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Therapeutic Human Experimentation
Abstract
One hundred and fourteen in- and out-patients from a department of internal medicine were interviewed, on the basis of a questionnaire with the following key questions: 1) Their attitudes to medical trials with man as the subject. 2) Their emphasis on informed consent. 3) Their attitudes to inclusion of patients not being able to give informed consent. 4) Their attitudes to tentative participation in 4 concrete projects. In all, 98% considered doctors' and patients' collaboration on new therapeutical methods both necessary and desirable. Eighty-eight per cent considered information of patients participating in trials a prerequisite. Eighty-six per cent accepted participation in scientific trials based on the guarantee of the doctors responsible. Of these 86%, 58% felt that a scientific-ethical committee's accept of the project implied an extra element of security. Seventy-five per cent replied that patients not being able to give informed consent themselves could be included in scientific trials. The majority, 77%, added that patients' relatives would then have to accept, 20% that such trials could be based on the participating doctors' responsibility, and only 2% that such a responsibility was to place on scientific-ethical committees. In the 4 concrete projects, answers followed a uniform trend: full information of patients was demanded by approximately 80%, and acceptance of participation resting with responsible doctors in more than 80%. Less than half of these 80% felt that evaluation by a scientific-ethical committee would add to patients' security.
PubMed ID
6702499 View in PubMed
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