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10 records – page 1 of 1.

[Blood pressure in Greenland Eskimos].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245528
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1980 Aug 25;142(35):2278-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-25-1980

Cadmium concentrations in blood samples from an East Greenlandic population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3607
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1985 Oct;32(5):277-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1985
Author
J C Hansen
H C Wulf
N. Kromann
K. Albøge
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1985 Oct;32(5):277-9
Date
Oct-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cadmium - blood
Cadmium Poisoning - blood
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Food Habits
Greenland
Humans
Male
Seals, Earless
Smoking
Abstract
An analysis for cadmium was made of 101 human blood samples from the district of Angmagssalik, East Greenland, and 29 from East Greenlanders living temporarily in Copenhagen. No relationship could be found between concentrations of blood cadmium and ethnic origin (Eskimos--Danes), sex, age or amount of seal eaten. Only smoking habits were reflected, as a median of 2.2 micrograms/l was found in smokers and 1.1 in non-smokers. Since analyses of organs from seals have suggested that the WHO provisional, tolerable weekly intake is exceeded by a factor as high as 10 as a result of seal eating, it is surprising that seal eating is without any effect on the blood concentration.
PubMed ID
4053702 View in PubMed
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Epidemiological studies in the Upernavik district, Greenland. Incidence of some chronic diseases 1950-1974.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16247
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1980;208(5):401-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
N. Kromann
A. Green
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1980;208(5):401-6
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Female
Greenland
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Peptic Ulcer - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
An epidemiological survey of several chronic diseases in the Upernavik district, Northwest Greenland, is reported. The study population (approx. 1800 inhabitants) is one of the remaining whaling and sealing populations in Greenland. It was observed over the 25-year period 1950-74 as to the incidence of the diseases, which was based on all cases diagnosed in hospital during this period. The disease pattern of the Greenlanders differs from that of West-European populations, having a higher frequency of apoplexy and epilepsy but a lower frequency or absence of acute myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, thyrotoxicosis, bronchial asthma, multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. The distribution of cancer types differs from that of the Danish population, but the total incidence of cancer is of the same magnitude. Further comparable studies should be performed in Greenlandic districts that are characterized by more profound changes in life style, in order to elucidate the effect of these changes on the disease pattern.
PubMed ID
7457208 View in PubMed
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Eskimoes and Caucasians have the same SCE levels both in Greenland and in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237600
Source
Hereditas. 1986;105(2):273-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986

Fertility and mortality 1950-1974 in the Upernavik district, Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4719
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1983;11(3):69-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
A. Green
N. Kromann
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1983;11(3):69-73
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AdolescentAdult
Aged
Birth rate
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fertility
Fetal Death
Greenland
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tuberculosis - mortality
Abstract
A descriptive study of fertility and mortality in a Greenlandic whaling and sealing community of approximately 1 800 individuals during the period 1950-74 was performed on the basis of data from parish records and medical reports. Fertility was on the increase until approximately 1960 after which it declined considerably. No significant reduction in the high stillbirth and infant mortality rates could be demonstrated. A considerable reduction in overall mortality was observed and could be attributed to the eradication of tuberculosis as a cause of death. The results are discussed in the light of data from Greenland as a whole, which in general has been characterized by intense industrialization and social development. Further comparative studies in Arctic communities characterized by varying degrees of socio-economic development are recommended.
PubMed ID
6686891 View in PubMed
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Human exposure to heavy metals in East Greenland. II. Lead.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3611
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1983 Feb;26(3):245-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1983
Author
J C Hansen
N. Kromann
H C Wulf
K. Albøge
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1983 Feb;26(3):245-54
Date
Feb-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Environmental Exposure
Ethanol - adverse effects
Female
Food Contamination
Greenland
Humans
Intestinal Absorption - drug effects
Iron - pharmacology
Lead - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Smoking
Abstract
The concentration of lead in 175 blood samples originating from the district of Angmagssalik, East Greenland and 130 from Aarhus, Denmark, has been determined. Both Greenland and Danish males had significantly higher (5%) blood lead than females (Eskimoan males 14.8 micrograms Pb/100 ml, females 12.8 micrograms Pb/100 ml; Danish males 10.5 micrograms Pb/100 ml, females 7.7 micrograms Pb/100 ml). For Danes living temporarily in Greenland the values were: males 10.5 and females 10.2 micrograms Pb/100 ml. Eskimos of both sexes were found to have higher blood lead values than Danes living in the same area. Danish males from Greenland and Denmark were not found to be different, whereas Danish women living in Greenland had a significantly higher (5%) mean value than women living in Denmark. In the Eskimo group, but not in the Danish, a weak, positive, but significant age correlation was found. 4 samples of Eskimo origin exceeded 35 micrograms Pb/100 ml accepted in the EEC as a maximum value for non-occupationally exposed persons. When re-examined 5 months later, all values were below this limit. The influence of eating habits (local or imported food) and smoking habits was tested, but not found to influence the blood lead concentration. The results have confirmed that blood lead levels in Greenland are comparable to those found in European industrialized areas. The reason for the unexpected high level in the arctic area with minimum car driving and industry remains to be clarified.
PubMed ID
6857234 View in PubMed
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Human exposure to heavy metals in East Greenland. I. Mercury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242209
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1983 Feb;26(3):233-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1983
Author
J C Hansen
H C Wulf
N. Kromann
K. Albøge
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1983 Feb;26(3):233-43
Date
Feb-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Animals
Environmental Exposure
Female
Food Contamination
Food Habits
Greenland
Hair - analysis
Humans
Male
Mercury - blood - toxicity
Middle Aged
Seals, Earless
Abstract
The concentration of mercury in 178 blood samples and 32 hair samples from the Angmagssalik district in East Greenland has been determined. For Greenlanders mercury concentrations are highly dependent on the amount of seal eaten. In the most heavily exposed group (eating more than six meals of seal per week), a significant positive correlation between blood mercury and age was demonstrated. No differences according to sex were demonstrated when the mean values were corrected for influence of age. In the most heavily exposed group, a mean value of 62.5 micrograms Hg/l was found, while in the group eating 1 meal of seal or less per week, the mean value was 22.2 micrograms Hg/l. In the control group consisting of Danes living temporarily in the district, the mean blood mercury concentration was 5.8 corresponding to the fact that they eat seal only occasionally. Hair mercury concentrations were found to correlate well with blood mercury concentrations (r=0.9222). The hair/blood ratio was estimated to 289. It is concluded that the present relatively high mercury exposure in Greenland does not exert any immediate risk of intoxication to the adult population, but supplementary investigation on fetal exposure is needed.
PubMed ID
6857233 View in PubMed
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Relative ultraviolet spectral intensity of direct solar radiation, sky radiation and surface reflections. Relative contribution of natural sources to the outdoor UV irradiation of man.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237193
Source
Photodermatol. 1986 Apr;3(2):73-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1986
Author
N. Kromann
H C Wulf
P. Eriksen
H. Brodthagen
Source
Photodermatol. 1986 Apr;3(2):73-82
Date
Apr-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Humans
Radiation Dosage
Scattering, Radiation
Seasons
Seawater
Sunlight
Ultraviolet Rays
Abstract
Relative measurements of UVA and UVB radiation from the sun and the sky, as well as the reflected intensity from various land and water surfaces, have been carried out in the Copenhagen area. The measurements were taken in January and in the period April through July and supplemented by measurements in Greenland during May. Likewise, the angular distribution of direct solar radiation and sky radiation close to the direction of the sun was measured with a 0.5 degree field of view. Absolute UV irradiances were measured with detector-filter combinations. Calculations of the relative contributions of direct solar radiation, sky radiation and reflected radiation to the irradiation of a standing person show, in particular, that if seawater with waves is the surrounding scene, its reflected radiation will account for more than 10% of the received UV dose.
PubMed ID
3703716 View in PubMed
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Selenium and its interrelation with mercury in wholeblood and hair in an East Greenlandic population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4959
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1984 Sep;38:33-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1984
Author
J C Hansen
N. Kromann
H C Wulf
K. Albøge
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1984 Sep;38:33-40
Date
Sep-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Female
Greenland
Hair - analysis
Humans
Male
Mercury - analysis - blood
Middle Aged
Selenium - analysis - blood
Abstract
138 Blood samples and 12 hair samples from the district of Angmagssalik, East Greenland, have been analysed for selenium and mercury. It was found that selenium like mercury, was absorbed in accordance with the amount of marine food eaten. The mean blood concentration in the group eating most marine food was 173 and 186 micrograms Hg/1 for men and women, respectively, while in the group eating the lowest quantity of marine food, the mean values were 86 and 118 micrograms Hg/1. In blood, the selenium and mercury did not correlate in individuals, but only in groups according to eating habits. On a molar basis, selenium is present in blood in excess as compared to mercury, while the opposite is the case for hair. It is concluded that only part of the selenium interacts with mercury, and that blood, but not hair, reflects present dietary intake. The righ supply of selenium in relation to mercury exposure through the traditional arctic food is probably able to alleviate the hazards from dietary mercury exposure.
PubMed ID
6523123 View in PubMed
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Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in Greenlandic Eskimos. Dose-response relationship between SCE and seal diet, smoking, and blood cadmium and mercury concentrations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3606
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1986 Jan;48(1-2):81-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1986
Author
H C Wulf
N. Kromann
N. Kousgaard
J C Hansen
E. Niebuhr
K. Albøge
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1986 Jan;48(1-2):81-94
Date
Jan-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Animals
Cadmium - blood
Diet
Female
Greenland
Humans
Inuits
Male
Meat
Mercury - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seals, Earless
Sister Chromatid Exchange
Smoking
Abstract
The mutagenicity of the chromosomes of the peripheral lymphocytes of 147 Greenlandic Eskimos living in the district of Angmagssalik, Greenland, and in Denmark, was evaluated by means of the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) test. Thirty cells from each person were examined. The purpose of the investigation was to determine if there was any relationship between mutagenic activity and diet, and hence the elements selenium, cadmium, mercury and lead. The probands were divided into three groups according to their intake of seal meat or industrially prepared food: group 1, those eating seal at least six times per week; group 2, two to five times per week; and group 3 once each week or not at all. The statistical analysis was performed by means of multiple linear regression analyses, with diet, living district, sex, age, tobacco smoking, and blood lead and mercury concentrations as variables. Forty-eight percent of the variation in SCE could be explained by differences in diet, living district, age, and tobacco consumption. Groups 1 and 2 had a 1.7 and 0.65 times higher SCE/cell, respectively, than group 3. For every additional 10 years of age of the probands, the SCE/cell increased by 0.4, and for every 10 g of tobacco smoked per day the SCE/cell was 0.7 higher compared to non-smokers. When priority was given to blood Hg concentration in the calculation, 16.3% of the total variation in SCE/cell could be explained. An increase in the blood Hg concentration of 10 micrograms l-1 corresponded to an increase of 0.3 SCE/cell. In 92 individuals blood Se and Cd concentrations were also analysed. The variables, tobacco smoking, diet, living district and Cd explained 53% of the total variation in SCE. Giving priority to the blood Hg and Cd concentrations, explained 21.4% of the total variation in SCE/cell. An increase of 10 micrograms l-1 in blood Cd and Hg corresponded to an increase in SCE/cell of 0.7 and 0.2, respectively. No influence on the SCE/cell could be attributed to the blood Pb and Se concentrations. Evaluated by the SCE test, seal diet, smoking, living district and blood Hg and Cd concentrations all contribute to mutagenicity in Greenlandic Eskimos, with seal diet as the most important of the factors examined.
PubMed ID
3945798 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.