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Alcohol consumption and disability pension among middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10620
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1999 Aug;9(6):341-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
N O Månsson
L. Råstam
K F Eriksson
B. Israelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1999 Aug;9(6):341-8
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - economics
Alcoholism - economics
Disabled Persons
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyze the relation between alcohol consumption and the risk of disability pension among middle-aged men. METHODS: In the mid-seventies, complete birth-year cohorts of middle-aged male residents in Malmö, Sweden, were invited to participate in a general health survey. The 3751 men with complete data who constituted the cohort in this study were followed for 11 years. Alcohol consumption was estimated from the scores obtained from a test designed to identify subjects with alcohol related problems. RESULTS: Of the 498 men granted disability pension during follow-up, 48 stated to be teetotalers. The cumulative incidence of disability pension among teetotalers was 19%, whereas, it was 12% and 16%, respectively, among men with low and high alcohol consumption. The adjusted relative risk (RR) for acquiring a disability pension (using the group with low alcohol consumption as reference) was 1.8 among abstainers and 1.3 among men with high alcohol consumption. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol overconsumption, as well as teetotalism, showed a positive relation to disability pension, and a moderate alcohol intake was found to be beneficial with respect to the risk of future disability pension.
PubMed ID
10475533 View in PubMed
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Body mass index and disability pension in middle-aged men--non-linear relations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67682
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Feb;25(1):80-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
N O Månsson
K F Eriksson
B. Israelsson
J. Ranstam
A. Melander
L. Råstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, University hospital MAS, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Feb;25(1):80-5
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Humans
Insurance, Disability - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Thinness - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Obesity has, in a number of studies, been found to correlate to disability and mortality, primarily due to diseases of the circulatory and musculoskeletal systems. In addition, an excess mortality among underweight subjects has been observed in previous studies. METHODS: Five complete birth-year cohorts (1926-1930) of male residents in Malmö (n = 7697) were invited to the survey at the Department of Preventive Medicine, Malmö General Hospital, and 5926 (77%) attended with complete data. Each subject was followed from inclusion, defined by the date of examination, until the end of the calendar year when he turned 58, a total study period of approximately 11 years. Data on about 300 questionnaire items and laboratory tests were determined at the health survey visit. Nationwide Swedish data registers were used for surveillance. RESULTS: Of the participants, 4.7% were underweight, 37.7% overweight, 7.3% obese and 50.3% normal weight; 849 (14.3%) had been granted disability pension at the end of follow-up, 717 after screening. After adjustment for smoking there was a J-shaped relation between body mass index (BMI) and incidence of disability pension, the relative risk ( with the normal group as reference) among underweight men being 1.9. For the overweight subjects it was 1.3 and for the obese 2.8, all differences were significant. Disease of the musculoskeletal and circulatory systems and mental disorders accounted for 67.2% of all main diagnoses resulting in disability pensions during follow-up. A total of 377 (6.4%) men died during follow-up. Diseases of the circulatory system, neoplasms, injury/poisoning and diseases of the respiratory system accounted for 91.8% of the deaths. CONCLUSIONS: Both underweight, overweight and obesity were related to risk of disability pension, with a J-shaped risk relationship.
PubMed ID
8666508 View in PubMed
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Disability pension in Malmöhus county: aspects on long-term financial effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10856
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1998 Jun;26(2):102-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
N O Månsson
L. Råstam
A. Adolfsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1998 Jun;26(2):102-5
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chronic Disease - economics
Cost of Illness
Disabled Persons
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Security - economics
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to estimate the financial costs of disability pension in order to compare the financial burden and the numerical distribution of disability pension by main diagnostic groups. During three months all new disability pensions (n = 944) granted in Malmöhus county were registered. During a follow-up of approximately two and a half years, 40 subjects died and 15 pensions expired. The predominating diagnoses were musculoskeletal diseases, mental disorders including alcohol dependence, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. To analyse whether these proportions changed when the extent of the pension, age at pension and the retirement allowance were considered, the present value of the total retirement allowances was calculated. The ranking of the four predominating diagnosis categories was not affected by the extent of the pension or the age at which the pension was granted. Thus, musculoskeletal diseases still predominated, although the proportion decreased. Among unemployed subjects, mental disorders made the largest contribution to the total expenditure. The results gained may be used in further research where alternatives to disability pension for different groups of patients and/or diagnoses are investigated.
PubMed ID
9658508 View in PubMed
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Middle-aged men before and after disability pension. Health screening profile with special emphasis on alcohol consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12635
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(3):185-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
N O Månsson
B. Israelsson
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(3):185-9
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology
Back Pain - psychology
Cardiovascular Diseases - psychology
Disability Evaluation
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Pensions
Sweden
Abstract
A total of 5,950 male Malmö residents (from five cohorts, 1926-30) were health screened on two occasions, with an interval of 4-8 years. Disability pensions were granted to 215, of whom 123 were screened both before and after being pensioned. Those 123 constitute the study group reported on here. Among answers to the questionnaire, back and joint pain were the most common complaints mentioned. However, the most striking distinction between the study group and controls was the values of gamma-GT (gamma glutamyltransferase), indicating overconsumption of alcohol in the group of prospective pensioners. Complaints concerning the back were also an outstanding feature of those belonging to the highest deciles of gamma-GT after--but not before--the disability pension had been granted.
PubMed ID
2956674 View in PubMed
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Mortality in elderly men with low psychosocial coping resources using anxiolytic-hypnotic drugs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195554
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2000 Dec;28(4):294-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
J. Merlo
P O Ostergren
N O Månsson
B S Hanson
J. Ranstam
G. Blennow
S O Isacsson
A. Melander
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. juan.merlo@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2000 Dec;28(4):294-7
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - classification - drug effects
Aged
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Benzodiazepines
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications - drug therapy
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Insufficient coping with stress may lead to increased susceptibility for disease and death. Use of anxiolytic-hypnotic drugs has been suggested as a coping strategy, and some opinions have proposed their use as preventive medication. The aim of this study was to estimate if use of anxiolytic-hypnotic drugs counters the increased mortality observed in individuals lacking other coping strategies such as emotional support and social participation.
A population based cohort study with 10-year (1982/83-1993) survival analysis was performed in 491 men born in 1914, living in the Swedish city of Malmö.
Compared with men with a high level of psychosocial coping resources who did not use anxiolytic-hypnotic drugs, men with a low level of psychosocial coping resources had a higher risk of death irrespective whether they used anxiolytic-hypnotic drugs, RR = 1.7 (95% CI 1.1-2.6) or not RR = 1.8 (95%: 1.3-2.5).
Anxiolytic-hypnotic drugs do not seem to counter increased mortality in elderly men with low psychosocial coping resources.
PubMed ID
11228117 View in PubMed
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The relation between self-rated health, socioeconomic status, body mass index and disability pension among middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74970
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2001;17(1):65-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
N O Månsson
J. Merlo
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. nils-ove.mansson@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2001;17(1):65-9
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pensions
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the relations between self-rated health (SRH), socioeconomic status (SES), body mass index (BMI) and disability pension. Five birth-year cohorts of middle-aged male residents in Malmö, Sweden, were invited and 5313 with complete data constituted the cohort in this study. Each subject was followed for approximately 11 years. Of all subjects, 73% perceived their health as perfect and among obese men and blue collar workers, the corresponding figures were 67 and 68% respectively. The adjusted odds ratios for SRH less than perfect was 1.3 (CI: 1.1-1.7) for obese subjects and 1.7 (CI: 1.5-1.9) for blue collar workers. The interaction between low SES and obesity was estimated to 11% which was not statistically significant. The adjusted relative risks (RR) of disability pension was 3.3 for subjects with SRH less than perfect, 2.2 for blue collar workers and 2.0 for obese subjects, all statistically significant and only marginally less than the crude RR. Thus, SRH among middle-aged men was associated with obesity as well as low SES, but no evidence of synergism between obesity and low SES in relation to SRH was found. Furthermore, poor SRH in particular, but also low SES and obesity, independently predicted disability pension.
PubMed ID
11523578 View in PubMed
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Risk factors for respiratory tract infections in children aged 2-5 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32051
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2001 Jun;19(2):122-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
G. Forssell
A. Håkansson
N O Månsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2001 Jun;19(2):122-5
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Drug Utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study risk factors for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in children aged 2-5 years. DESIGN: A questionnaire was used to chart the number of visits to doctors and the number of antibiotics courses because of RTIs during a 1-year period. The risk factors studied were age, sex, birth weight, breastfeeding, atopy, siblings, smoking and childcare. SETTING: The catchment area of Oxie health centre in southern Sweden. SUBJECTS: 190 pre-school children. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of visits to doctors and number of antibiotics courses. RESULTS: The risk of having to consult a doctor, as well as the risk of receiving treatment with antibiotics, because of RTIs was greater among children at daycare centres than among children who were mostly at home (adjusted OR 2.78 (95% CI 1.34-5.78) and 2.73 (1.38-5.43), respectively). CONCLUSION: Attending a daycare centre is the most important risk factor for RTIs in children aged 2-5 years.
PubMed ID
11482413 View in PubMed
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Self-rated health as a predictor of disability pension and death--a prospective study of middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74973
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2001 Jun;29(2):151-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
N O Månsson
L. Råstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden. nils-ove.mansson@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2001 Jun;29(2):151-8
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropometry
Attitude to Health
Disability Evaluation
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Self-rated health (SRH) is increasingly attracting attention as a predictor of morbidity and mortality while its relation to impaired function has been given less momentum. The aim of this study was to assess the relation between SRH and the risk of being awarded a disability pension and premature death. METHODS: Five birth-year cohorts of middle-aged men were invited to a screening programme and were followed for approximately 11 years. Of the 718 (12%) men with a disability pension granted during follow-up, 46% had perceived their health as perfect on inclusion. The corresponding figure for the remaining 5,082 men was 77%. RESULTS: The crude relative risk (RR) of disability pension for men with SRH less than perfect was 3.7 (3.2-4.2). After adjustment for premorbidity/medication, the RR declined to 3.3 (2.8-3.8). The crude RR of death associated with SRH less than perfect was 1.6 (1.3-2.0), unchanged after adjustment. CONCLUSION: The results showed that SRH is a strong and independent predictor of disability and, to a lesser degree, of mortality.
PubMed ID
11484868 View in PubMed
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Socioeconomic inequalities and disability pension in middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75026
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1998 Dec;27(6):1019-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
N O Månsson
L. Råstam
K F Eriksson
B. Israelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1998 Dec;27(6):1019-25
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Comparative Study
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - economics - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Rehabilitation - economics - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The issue of inequalities in health has generated much discussion and socioeconomic status is considered an important variable in studies of health. It is frequently used in epidemiological studies, either as a possible risk factor or a confounder and the aim of this study was to analyse the relation between socioeconomic status and risk of disability pension. METHODS: Five complete birth year cohorts of middle-aged male residents in Malmo were invited to a health survey and 5782 with complete data constituted the cohort in this prospective study. Each subject was followed for approximately 11 years and nationwide Swedish data registers were used for surveillance. RESULTS: Among the 715 men (12%), granted disability pension during follow-up, three groups were distinguished. The cumulative incidence of disability pension among blue collar workers was 17% and among lower and higher level white collar workers, 11% and 6% respectively. With simultaneous adjustment for biological risk factors and job conditions, the relative risk for being granted a disability pension (using higher level white collar workers as reference) was 2.5 among blue collar workers and 1.6 among lower level white collar workers. CONCLUSIONS: Socioeconomic status, as defined by occupation, is a risk factor for being granted disability pension even after adjusting for work conditions and other risk factors for disease.
PubMed ID
10024197 View in PubMed
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The use of analgesics and hypnotics in relation to self-rated health and disability pension--a prospective study of middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74974
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2001 Jun;29(2):133-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
N O Månsson
J. Merlo
P O Ostergren
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden. nils-ove.mansson@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2001 Jun;29(2):133-9
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
Disability Evaluation
Employment - psychology
Health status
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: This cohort study on urban middle-aged men investigates the association between the use of analgesics and hypnotics, self-rated health (SRH) and disability pension. METHODS: Five birth-year cohorts of middle-aged, urban, Swedish men were invited to a screening programme and were followed for approximately 11 years. RESULTS: Out of all the subjects (n = 5798), 12.4% received a disability pension during follow-up, 27.0% rated their health as less than perfect, 10.6% used analgesics and 2.9% used hypnotics. Compared with non-users of analgesics and hypnotics, the adjusted hazard ratio of disability pension for the simultaneous use of both drugs was 7.0 (95% CI: 4.3, 11.6) and the adjusted odds ratio of poor SRH was 16.5 (6.3, 43.5). Thus, the use of analgesics and hypnotics was positively related to poor SRH and predicted award of a disability pension within an 11-year follow-up. This may reflect that the use of analgesics and hypnotics is a proxy of disease but an independent negative effect on health cannot be excluded. CONCLUSIONS: Information on the use of these drugs could be used to predict the award of a disability pension, such as in different geographical areas or population groups.
PubMed ID
11484866 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.