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67 records – page 1 of 7.

Airborne chemicals cause respiratory symptoms in individuals with contact allergy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176079
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Feb;52(2):65-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
J. Elberling
A. Linneberg
H. Mosbech
A. Dirksen
T. Menné
N H Nielsen
F. Madsen
L. Frølund
J Duus Johansen
Author Affiliation
The National Allergy Research Centre, Department of Dermatology, Gentofte University Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark. jeel@gentoftehosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Feb;52(2):65-72
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Female
Hand Dermatoses - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Skin Tests - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Exposure to fragrance chemicals causes various eye and airway symptoms. Individuals with perfume contact allergy report these symptoms more frequently than individuals with nickel allergy or no contact allergies. However, the associations between contact allergy and respiratory symptoms elicited by airborne chemicals other than perfumes are unclear. The study aimed to investigate the association between eye and airway symptoms elicited by airborne chemicals (other than perfumes) and contact allergy in a population-based sample. A questionnaire on respiratory symptoms was posted, in 2002, to 1189 individuals who participated in 1997/1998 in a Danish population-based study of allergic diseases. Questions about eye and airway symptoms elicited by different airborne chemicals and airborne proteins were included in the questionnaire. Data from the questionnaire were compared with data on patch testing and prick testing. Having at least 1 positive patch test (adjusted odds ratio 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.5) was associated with the symptoms, and the odds ratio increased with the number of positive patch tests (P-value for test for trend
PubMed ID
15725282 View in PubMed
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Allergen skin test reactivity in an unselected Danish population. The Glostrup Allergy Study, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67758
Source
Allergy. 1994 Feb;49(2):86-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
N H Nielsen
U G Svendsen
F. Madsen
A. Dirksen
Author Affiliation
Glostrup Population Studies, Medical Department C, Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Allergy. 1994 Feb;49(2):86-91
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Allergens
Animals
Antigens, Dermatophagoides
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fungi
Glycoproteins
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pollen
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Skin Tests
Smoking
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of allergen skin test reactivity in an unselected Danish population. A total of 793 subjects, aged 15-69 years, were invited, and 599 (75.5%) attended. The skin prick test was performed with standardized allergen extracts of high potency. Skin reactivity occurred in 28.4% of the subjects. The frequency of skin reactivity to the specific allergens ranged from 1.5% (Cladosporium) to 12.5% (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus), and the frequencies of skin reactivity to the allergen groups (pollen, animal dander, house-dust mites, and molds) were 17.6%, 8.7%, 14.0%, and 3.2%, respectively. Young women appeared to reflect the average skin reactivity. When compared with young women, skin reactivity to animal dander was more probable in young men (odds ratio (OR) value = 2.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) of odds ratio value = 1.1-6.1). Current smokers were less likely than nonsmokers to be skin-reactive to pollen (OR = 0.4; 95% CI = 0.3-0.7). In conclusion, allergen skin test reactivity was common, and was related to sex, age, smoking history, and probably genetic predisposition.
PubMed ID
8172364 View in PubMed
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Allergic contact sensitization in an adult Danish population: two cross-sectional surveys eight years apart (the Copenhagen Allergy Study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194321
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2001 Jan-Feb;81(1):31-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
N H Nielsen
A. Linneberg
T. Menné
F. Madsen
L. Frølund
A. Dirksen
T. Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Gentofte Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2001 Jan-Feb;81(1):31-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Allergens - pharmacology
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Haptens - diagnostic use
Humans
Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Incidence
Male
Odds Ratio
Patch Tests - methods
Population Surveillance
Sampling Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
In 1990 and 1998 15-41-year-old people were patch-tested in 2 cross-sectional studies of random samples of the population in the western part of Copenhagen County, Denmark. In 1990, 290 subjects and in 1998, 469 subjects were patch-tested. The participation rates were 69% and 51%, respectively. Contact sensitivity to one or more haptens was found in 15.9% and 18.6% in 1990 and 1998, respectively. Nickel sensitivity is still the most common contact sensitivity. The risk of contact sensitivity to the cosmetic-related haptens included in the series (formaldehyde was not included) increased significantly from 2.4% in 1990 to 5.8% in 1998 (odds ratio 2.44, 95% confidence interval 1.04-5.73). The prevalence of contact sensitivity to cosmetic-related allergens has been doubled between 1990 and 1998.
PubMed ID
11411911 View in PubMed
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Allergic contact sensitization in an unselected Danish population. The Glostrup Allergy Study, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222829
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1992 Nov;72(6):456-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
N H Nielsen
T. Menné
Author Affiliation
Medical Department C, Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1992 Nov;72(6):456-60
Date
Nov-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Haptens - diagnostic use
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Patch Tests
Questionnaires
Abstract
The distribution of allergic contact sensitization was assessed in an unselected population, living in western Copenhagen, Denmark. Ready-to-apply patch tests comprising 23 haptens and mixtures of haptens were mailed to 793 adults, and 567 (71.5%) participated. The tests were read 2 days after application. A total of 111 positive reactions were found among 86 (15.2%) subjects. Sensitization was less frequent in men than in women (11.5% versus 18.8%). Twenty out of the 23 chemicals in the test elicited positive reactions. Positive reactions to nickel and thiomersal were found most frequently (6.7% and 3.4%, respectively). Concerning the other chemicals the frequencies were 1.1% or less. Nickel sensitivity was less frequent in men than in women (2.2% versus 11.1%). The frequencies of sensitization probably represent minimum figures. Regulation of exposure needs to be considered in order to prevent primary sensitization and disease recurrences in those already sensitized.
Notes
Erratum In: Acta Derm Venereol (Stockh) 1993 Oct;73(5):397
PubMed ID
1362844 View in PubMed
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The association between null mutations in the filaggrin gene and contact sensitization to nickel and other chemicals in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144633
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2010 Jun;162(6):1278-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
J P Thyssen
J D Johansen
A. Linneberg
T. Menné
N H Nielsen
M. Meldgaard
P B Szecsi
S. Stender
B C Carlsen
Author Affiliation
National Allergy Research Centre, Department of Dermato-Allergology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, University of Copenhagen, Niels Andersens Vej 65, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. jacpth01@geh.regionh.dk
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2010 Jun;162(6):1278-85
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dermatitis, Atopic - genetics - immunology
Ethylenediamines - adverse effects
Female
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Intermediate Filament Proteins - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Neomycin - adverse effects
Nickel - immunology - toxicity
Young Adult
Abstract
It was recently shown that filaggrin gene (FLG) null mutations are positively associated with nickel sensitization. We have hypothesized that histidine-rich filaggrin proteins in the epidermis chelate nickel ions and prevent their skin penetration and exposure to Langerhans cells. Furthermore, we have proposed that the low degree of genetic predisposition to nickel sensitization found by a Danish twin study was explained by a high prevalence of ear piercing among participants resulting in 'bypassing' of the filaggrin proteins.
To investigate the association between FLG null mutations and (nickel) contact sensitization.
A random sample of 3335 adults from the general population in Denmark was patch tested and genotyped for R501X and 2282del4 in the FLG gene.
The combined carrier frequency of FLG null mutations was 8·1%. Nickel, fragrance and contact sensitization to at least one allergen were not associated with FLG null mutations. A crude analysis on women who did not have ear piercings revealed a positive association between FLG null mutations and nickel sensitization [8·3% vs. 2·4%; odds ratio (OR) 3·71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·73-18·96] as well as between FLG null mutations and allergic nickel dermatitis (8·3% vs. 1·3%; OR 6·75, 95% CI 1·17-38·91). FLG mutation status and atopic dermatitis were positively associated with neomycin or ethylenediamine sensitization.
This study suggests that FLG null mutations may be a risk factor for the development of nickel sensitization. However, ear piercing was a much stronger risk factor in our general population and we could therefore identify a positive association only in women without ear piercings. Contact sensitization to specific chemicals is related to treatment exposure.
PubMed ID
20346018 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer in Greenland--selected epidemiological, clinical, and histological features.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27349
Source
J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 1980;98(3):287-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
N H Nielsen
J P Hansen
Source
J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 1980;98(3):287-99
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Female
Food Habits
Greenland
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Prolactin - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Time Factors
Abstract
Fifty-seven breast cancers were diagnosed among indigenous Greenlandic women from 1950 to 1974. An additional 22 cases registered between 1975 and 1979 represent a minimum number and were only used as basis for minimum incidence rates. Changes in age-adjusted rate, age-specific incidence pattern, and relative risk were consistent with an upward shift from a population of low risk between 1950 and 1969 to one of intermediate risk from 1970 onward, a finding that relates well to increased urbanization and westernization. The risk of breast cancer in Greenland may be associated with consumption of saturated fats but is seemingly not correlated to total fat intake which has always been on a par with high-risk Danish levels. An association with diet may in reality have been stronger than suggested but weakened by a counterbalancing effect of high fertility, especially in the youngest age groups. Evaluation of histological features and survival did not suggest differences which could favorably compare with findings in white population groups contrary to reported results from the population of Japan, also one of low risk and of mongoloid origin. Further studies should consider dietary intakes, endocrine variations, and breast fluid secretion with special attention to girls at the age of menarche.
PubMed ID
7228881 View in PubMed
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Cancer among Circumpolar Inuit 1969-1988. Introduction and methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4065
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):539-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N H Nielsen
H H Storm
N. Christensen
L A Gaudette
A P Lanier
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):539-43
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Cancer incidence data for Circumpolar Inuit populations were developed and compiled from Greenland, Canada and Alaska from 1969 to 1988 to provide the largest possible base of data for documenting the unusual patterns of cancer previously reported for these populations. Cancer incidence and population data were transferred to the Danish Cancer Registry. Coded information from various ICD-classifications and codes for the basis of diagnosis were transformed to one format, enabling joint analysis. Standard descriptive analysis was carried out with presentation of number of cases, crude incidence rates (CR), age-standardized rates (world) (ASR), cumulative rates to age 64 years, and indirectly standardized ratios (SIR) to the populations of Connecticut (USA), Canada and Denmark. The resulting database can be used to support collaborative international research among the Inuit populations.
PubMed ID
8813060 View in PubMed
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Cancer in Circumpolar Inuit 1969-1988. A summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3545
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):621-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N H Nielsen
H H Storm
L A Gaudette
A P Lanier
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):621-8
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Food Habits
Forecasting
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics - prevention & control
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Reproduction
Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Russia - epidemiology - ethnology
Sexual Behavior
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
The results of an international, collaborative study of cancer in Circumpolar Inuit in Greenland, Canada, Alaska and Russia are summarized. A total of 3 255 incident cancers were diagnosed from 1969 to 1988 among 85 000-110 000 individuals. Indirect standardization (SIR) based on comparison populations in Connecticut (USA), Canada and Denmark showed excess risk of cancer of the lung, nasopharynx, salivary glands, gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ducts in both sexes, of liver and stomach cancer in men, and renal and cervical cancer in women. Low risk was observed for cancer of the bladder, breast, endometrium and prostate, and for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, leukaemia, multiple myeloma and melanoma. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) of cancer of lung, cervix, nasopharynx and salivary glands among Inuit were among the world's highest as were rates in women of oesophageal and renal cancer. Regional differences in ASRs within the Circumpolar area were observed for cancer of the cervix, lung, colon and rectum, liver, gallbladder and breast. The differences in the Inuit cancer incidence pattern to some extent reflect known variations in lifestyle, diet and other exposures, as well as implementation of cancer control measures. Future research addressing possible individual differences are needed to evaluate environmental and genetic factors in etiology and evaluate intervention studies.
PubMed ID
8813071 View in PubMed
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Cancer in Circumpolar Inuit. Background information for the cancer pattern in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3549
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):535-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N H Nielsen
H H Storm
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):535-7
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Demography
Diet
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Topography, Medical
Abstract
The cancer pattern among Inuit in the Circumpolar area have shown marked differences to other populations in the world. The current paper summarises important risk factors in Greenland, including the physical environment, diet, alcohol, tobacco and other lifestyle factors. Details on population structure and history, health care and cancer registration are also included. This information is important for the interpretation of the incidence pattern for the Circumpolar Inuit collectively and for the understanding of differences between the various Inuit populations of the North.
PubMed ID
8813059 View in PubMed
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Cancer of the digestive system in Circumpolar Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3548
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):553-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
H H Storm
N H Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):553-70
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Biliary Tract Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Digestive System Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Male
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
Cancer of the oesophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, rectum, liver, gallbladder, biliary tract and pancreas was studied in the Inuit populations of Alaska, Canada and Greenland. Indirect standardization to the populations in Canada, Connecticut (USA) and Denmark was used. High risk of oesophageal cancer was observed in both sexes with standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of up to 7. An increased risk of colon and rectum cancer occurred among Alaskan Inuit compared with the Inuit populations in Canada and Greenland, which had lower rates. Liver and gallbladder cancer rates were high, with SIRs of 1.5 to 4.1, whereas there were no differences in pancreatic cancer in the populations compared. Dietary habits, alcohol and tobacco consumption are believed to play an important role in most of the observed cancer patterns, but for liver cancer hepatitis B virus infection is also believed to have a causal role.
PubMed ID
8813062 View in PubMed
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67 records – page 1 of 7.