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Age at onset of first episode and time to treatment in in-patients with bipolar disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88898
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2009 Jun;194(6):559-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Morken Gunnar
Vaaler Arne E
Folden Gunn E
Andreassen Ole A
Malt Ulrik F
Author Affiliation
Østmarka Psychiatric Department, St Olavs Hospital, Box 3008 Lade, Trondheim 7441, Norway. gunnar.morken@ntnu.no
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2009 Jun;194(6):559-60
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the relationship between age at onset and time to first pharmacological treatment in patients with either bipolar I or II disorder. A total of 146 consecutive in-patients acutely admitted from the same catchment area were included. Patients were divided into four age groups: 0-12 years (23%); 13-18 years (32%); 19-29 years (26%); and > or =30 years (18%). Mean age at first affective episode was 20.2 years (s.d.=11.8). This represents a similar pattern to the age at onset seen in out-patients in the USA. Early age at onset predicted a longer time to first pharmacological treatment (rho =-0.695, P
PubMed ID
19478300 View in PubMed
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Association analysis of PALB2 and BRCA2 in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in a scandinavian case-control sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99522
Source
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2010 Oct 5;153B(7):1276-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-5-2010
Author
Tesli Martin
Athanasiu Lavinia
Mattingsdal Morten
Kähler Anna K
Gustafsson Omar
Andreassen Bettina K
Werge Thomas
Hansen Thomas
Mors Ole
Mellerup Erling
Koefoed Pernille
Jönsson Erik G
Agartz Ingrid
Melle Ingrid
Morken Gunnar
Djurovic Srdjan
Andreassen Ole A
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2010 Oct 5;153B(7):1276-82
Date
Oct-5-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) found significant association between the PALB2 SNP rs420259 and bipolar disorder (BD). The intracellular functions of the expressed proteins from the breast cancer risk genes PALB2 and BRCA2 are closely related. Therefore, we investigated the relation between genetic variants in PALB2 and BRCA2 and BD. Due to increasing evidence of genetic overlap between BD and schizophrenia (SCZ), we also investigated association with SCZ. In a Scandinavian case-control sample (n?=?686/2,538) we found the BRCA2 SNP rs9567552 to be significantly associated with BD (Nominal P?=?0.00043). Additionally, we replicated the association between PALB2 SNP rs420259 and BD (Nominal P?=?0.025). We then combined our sample with another Nordic case-control sample (n?=?435/11,491) from Iceland, and added results from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) (n?=?1,868/2,938) and the STEP-UCL/ED-DUB-STEP2 study (n?=?2,558/3,274) in a meta-analysis which revealed a P-value of 1.2?×?10(-5) for association between PALB2 SNP rs420259 and BD (n?=?5,547/20,241). Neither the PALB2 SNP rs420259 nor the BRCA2 SNP rs9567552 were nominally significantly associated with the SCZ phenotype in our Scandinavian sample (n?=?781/2,839). Our findings support PALB2 and BRCA2 as risk genes specifically for BD, and suggest that altered DNA repair related to neurogenesis may be involved in BD pathophysiology. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
PubMed ID
20872766 View in PubMed
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Quantitative EEG findings in patients with acute, brief depression combined with other fluctuating psychiatric symptoms: a controlled study from an acute psychiatric department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91230
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:89
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Bjørk Marte Helene
Sand Trond
Bråthen Geir
Linaker Olav M
Morken Gunnar
Nilsen Brigt M
Vaaler Arne Einar
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. marte.bjork@ntnu.no
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:89
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Alpha Rhythm
Anticonvulsants - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Delta Rhythm
Depression - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Diagnosis, Differential
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Psychotic Disorders - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patients with brief depressive episodes and concurrent rapidly fluctuating psychiatric symptoms do not fit current diagnostic criteria and they can be difficult to diagnose and treat in an acute psychiatric setting. We wanted to study whether these patients had signs of more epileptic or organic brain dysfunction than patients with depression without additional symptomatology. METHODS: Sixteen acutely admitted patients diagnosed with a brief depressive episode as well as another concurrent psychiatric diagnosis were included. Sixteen patients with major depression served as controls. Three electroencephalographic studies (EEG) were visually interpreted and the background activity was also analysed with quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG). RESULTS: The group with brief depression and concurrent symptoms had multiple abnormal features in their standard EEG compared to patients with major depression, but they did not show significantly more epileptiform activity. They also had significantly higher temporal QEEG delta amplitude and interhemispheric temporal delta asymmetry. CONCLUSION: Organic brain dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of patients with brief depressive episodes mixed with rapidly fluctuating psychiatric symptoms. This subgroup of depressed patients should be investigated further in order to clarify the pathophysiology and to establish the optimal evaluation scheme and treatment in an acute psychiatric setting.
PubMed ID
19014422 View in PubMed
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Staff injuries after patient-staff incidences in psychiatric acute wards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77949
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2007;61(2):121-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Langsrud Knut
Linaker Olav M
Morken Gunnar
Author Affiliation
St. Olavs Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Østmarka, Trondheim, Norway. Knut.Langsrud@stolav.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2007;61(2):121-5
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggression - psychology
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Extremities - injuries
Female
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Professional-Patient Relations
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Thoracic Injuries - epidemiology
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of the study was to describe the pattern of injuries to various body parts in patient-staff incidents; 507 patient-staff incidents in a psychiatric acute ward during the period 1990-1997 were included. Staff members registered 193 injuries in the head, 112 in the trunk, 265 in the upper extremities and 69 in the lower extremities. No differences between the two sexes or between different levels of education among the nurses were found in the pattern of injuries. Doctors were more often injured in the head and less often injured in the upper extremity than the nurses. The head was more often injured when there was no understandable provocation before the incident and seldom injured when the patients were denied something. Injuries to the trunk were more frequently followed by use of parenteral medication. Parenteral medication and holding the patient with force were more frequently used in incidents where more than one body part was injured. The knowledge of injures after patient-staff incidences may contribute to the education and protective training of the staff of psychiatric acute wards.
PubMed ID
17454727 View in PubMed
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Substance use at admission to an acute psychiatric department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91339
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(2):113-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Fløvig John Chr
Vaaler Arne E
Morken Gunnar
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Department of Østmarka, St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(2):113-9
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Chromatography, Liquid
Comorbidity
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - urine
Abstract
Substance use is prevalent in patients with psychiatric disorders and may cause severe symptoms in addition to complicating the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders. The aims of the study were to find the prevalence in use of alcohol, drugs, benzodiazepines, hypnotics, opiates and stimulants, and to find the prevalence of substance use disorders at admission to an acute psychiatric department receiving all admissions from a catchment area. Patients were interviewed about use of medications and intoxicating substances during the last week before admission in 227 consecutive admissions. Urine samples were analysed with the liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method. Use of substances was determined from reported use and findings in urine samples. Diagnoses were set at discharge according to ICD-10 research criteria. In 81.9% of the admissions, the patient had used alcohol, drugs, benzodiazepines, hypnotics, opiates or stimulants prior to admission. More men used alcohol, cannabis and stimulants, whereas more women used benzodiazepines. In 31.7% of the admissions, 49.5% of men and 16.4% of women, the patients had a substance use disorder (ICD-10, F10-19). Patients with substance use disorders had a shorter stay in hospital than other patients, and patients with no psychiatric disorder other than substance use disorders had a median length of stay of 2 days. Most patients had used psychoactive substances before admission to the acute psychiatric department, and half of the men had a substance use disorder.
PubMed ID
18991157 View in PubMed
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