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Further studies on tularemia in Alaska: human tularemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1732
Source
Canadian Journal of Microbiology. 1974 Nov; 20(11):1539-1544.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974
Author
Miller, L.G.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Canadian Journal of Microbiology. 1974 Nov; 20(11):1539-1544.
Date
1974
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Bethel
Mountain Village
Pilot Station
St. Mary's
Hooper Bay
Zoonosis
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Agglutination Tests
Agglutinins - analysis
Alaska
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Reservoirs
Ethnic Groups
Female
Francisella tularensis - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Tularemia - epidemiology - immunology
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1876.
PubMed ID
4434260 View in PubMed
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Observations on the distribution and ecology of Clostridium botulinum type E in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1733
Source
Canadian Journal of Microbiology. 1975 Jun; 21(6):920-926.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Author
Miller, L.G.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Canadian Journal of Microbiology. 1975 Jun; 21(6):920-926.
Date
1975
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Botulism, type E
Diet, traditional
Environmental health
Culture survey
Zoonosis
Alaska
Animals
Botulinum Toxins - isolation & purification
Clostridium botulinum - enzymology - isolation & purification
Ecology
Food Microbiology
Gelatin - metabolism
Otters - microbiology
Peptide Hydrolases
Salmon - microbiology
Seals, Earless - microbiology
Soil Microbiology
Temperature
Walruses - microbiology
Water Microbiology
Whales - microbiology
Abstract
Environmental samples collected along the coastline and from the interior of Alaska were examined for the presence of Clostridium botulinum. Clostridium botulinum type E was detected in soils from 5 of 12 beaches; in 7 of 115 non-coastal soil samples; in sediments from six of eight locales; in gills of salmon from two fishing areas; and in the feces of 1 of 44 colonic samples from marine mammals. The basic biochemical characteristics of the isolates were determined. Tube tests for demonstrating gelatin liquefaction proved insensitive with these strains, whereas a plate test detected gelatinase in all isolates. The presence of multiple nidi and the continual discharge of organic materials into the environment may contribute to the perpetuation of botulinum spores by which foods prepared form marine animals become contaminated. An emphasis should be placed upon the need for measures to reduce environmental contamination, to reduce contamination during food preparation, and to alert continually the population of the hazard wherever botulism is endemic.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1847.
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Possible origin of Clostridium botulinum contamination of Eskimo foods in northwestern Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1734
Source
Applied Microbiology. 1972 Feb; 23(2):427-428.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1972
Author
Miller, L.G.
Clark, P.S.
Kunkle, G.A.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Applied Microbiology. 1972 Feb; 23(2):427-428.
Date
1972
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Point Hope
Kotzebue
Environmental health
Botulism, type E
Culture survey
Zoonosis
Alaska
Animals
Botulinum Toxins - analysis
Botulism - etiology
Clostridium botulinum - growth & development - isolation & purification
Culture Media
Disease Outbreaks
Food Contamination
Humans
Inuits
Mice
Soil Microbiology
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1848.
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