Skip header and navigation

10 records – page 1 of 1.

An evaluation of winter survival shelters used by the U.S. Air Force in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298752
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-8. 31 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
January 1961
  1 document  
Author
Milan, Frederick A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-8. 31 p.
Date
January 1961
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3159329
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Survival shelters
Abstract
The thermal environments of six winter survival shelters with woodburning fires were investigated at Ladd AFB, Alaska, in the winter months of 1954. Ambient temperatures ranged between 0° and -41° F. The survival shelters included a one- and six-man lean-to, two types of paratepees, a willow shelter, and a moss covered shelter. A glass cloth fireplace utilized in the tests proved to be a light-weight and portable substitute for a Yukon stove and allowed a fire to be kindled in an enclosed shelter. The willow shelter, paratepees, and moss covered house provided adequate and similar thermal environments. The lean-tos were inadequate and it is recommended that teaching of their construction be discontinued in the Arctic Survival School. It is further recommended that consideration be given by the Arctic Survival School to the construction of moss covered shelters, as moss mats are abundant in the arctic taiga.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.60-8
Documents
Less detail

Cold water tests of USAF anti-exposure suits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298779
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-64-31. 23 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1965
Laboratory UNCLASSIFIED 2b. GROUP NIA 3. REPORT TITLE COLD WATER TESTS OF USAF ANTI-EXPOSURE SUITS 4. DESCRIPTIVE NOTES (Typo al report and lnclualvo datoa) Phase III of Test Directive s. AUTHOR(S) (Lasl name, llrst namo, lnltlol) Milan, Frederick A &. REPORT DA TE June 1965 &a. CONTRACT OR
  1 document  
Author
Milan, Frederick A.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-64-31. 23 p.
Date
June 1965
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2333247
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Humans
Physiological tesing
Survival
Anti-exposure suits
Cold Temperature
Water submersion
Abstract
This report presents the results of physiological testing of some anti-exposure suits, either currently in the Air Force inventory or being considered for the inventory, as part of a "Life Saving System." The tests were carried out both in an Alaskan river with water temperatures of 0°, 2°, 7° and 12° C and air temperatures of -18°, 1°, 12° and 15° C, and in a temperature-controlled box at an air temperature of -30° C with a water temperature of 0° C. The suits tested were the RI-A, the CWU-3/P and the CWU-12/P. After being instrumented so as to obtain skin and rectal temperatures, between six and eight subjects wore each of the clothing assemblies under simulated water survival conditions. The subjects jumped into cold water, then boarded and remained in an MB-4 one-man life raft for 2 hours or until rectal temperature fell to 35° C. The nearly linear falls of rectal temperature with time were extrapolated to 31° C, a reasonable cut-off temperature, and this time was termed "estimated survival time." By this method it was determined that the rectal temperatures of subjects dressed in the CWU-12/P in 12° C water and 15° C air would reach 31° C in 15 hours. The severely hypothermic subject would then be revivable in a tank of warm water at 41° to 42° C. On the basis of these experiments, it is recommended that the Air Force substitute an insulated raft for the MB-4's currently in the inventory. Insulation in the floor and canopy of the raft will markedly increase survival time. The results of the testing program in the cold box at -30° C showed that vapor-impermeable anti-exposure suits are unsuitable for cold land survival. The suits must be removed and a down-filled arctic survival garment donned under these conditions.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.64-31
Documents
Less detail

The effect of a year in the Antarctic on human thermal and metabolic responses to an acute standardized cold stress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298753
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-9. 21 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
March 1961
  1 document  
Author
Milan, Frederick A.
Elsner, Robert W.
Rodahl, Kaare
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-9. 21 p.
Date
March 1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3549732
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Antarctica
Humans
Metabolism
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Body temperature
Physiological adaptation
Abstract
The metabolic rate and thermal responses of eight healthy subjects exposed nude for 2 hours to a standard cold stress (17° +/- 1. 0° C air temperature) were examined in the fall, winter, and spring at Little America V in the Antarctic. Mean body, average skin and foot temperatures increased significantly (P
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.60-9
Documents
Less detail

Foreword (Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283757
Source
Pages xxi-xxii in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
  1 document  
Author
Milan, Frederick A.
Author Affiliation
President of the Symposium
Source
Pages xxi-xxii in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle.
Date
1985
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Documents
Less detail

Nutrition and energy expenditure at Little America V in the Antarctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298754
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-11. 17 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
March 1961
  1 document  
Author
Milan, Frederick A.
Rodahl, Kaare
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-11. 17 p.
Date
March 1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3348576
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Antarctica
Humans
Nutrition
Metabolism
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Caloric intake
Abstract
A detailed survey of nutrition and energy expenditure was undertaken to establish the effects of chronic cold exposure and changing levels of activity upon the nutritional requirements of men living at an Antarctic base. This survey represented 104 subject days (6-day periods) in the Antarctic fall, winter, and spring. In the fall, five scientists averaged a daily expenditure of 3775 Calories and consumed 3400 Calories (42 Cal/kg/diem). In the winter and spring, expenditures for four scientists averaged 3370 and 4175 Calories and intakes were 4396 and 4285 Calories (53 and 54 Cal/kg/diem). Four sailors, engaged in moderate to heavy work outside, expended about 3600 Calories per day and consumed. 4925 Calories (61 Cal/kg/diem) when studied in the spring. The percentage of calories furnished by protein, fat, and carbohydrate was not significantly different from those to be found in the diet of U.S. troops eating a garrison ration elsewhere. There was no increased avidity for fat over the year. The scientists gained an average of 1. 5 kilograms in body weight, and the sailors an average of 4. 6 kilograms over the 11-month period. It is suggested that eating served to alleviate the tedium of long isolation and that psychological, as well as physiological, reasons lay behind the high caloric intakes seen in some subjects.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.60-11
Documents
Less detail

Oxygen consumption and body temperatures of Eskimos during sleep.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297282
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-66-10.
Publication Type
Report
Date
July 1966
Julv 1963 s. AUTHOR(SJ (La1tt name, first name, Initial) Milan, Frederick A. and Eugene Evonuk 6. REPORT DATE 7a. T-OTA L NO. OF PAGES July 1966 28 ea. CONTRACT OR GRANT NO. (In House) 9a. ORI GINA TOR'S REPORT NUMBER(S) AAL-TR-66-10 b. PRO.JECT NO. 8238 c. TASK NO. 823801 9b. OTHER REPORT
  1 document  
Author
Milan, Frederick A.
Evonuk, Eugene
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-66-10.
Date
July 1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1445625
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Humans
Indians of North America
Metabolism
Sleeping
Body temperature
Sleep cycle
Abstract
This paper reports the results of measurements of metabolism and body temperatures taken during 14 nights of comfortably warm sleep in six male Eskimos from the village of Wainwright on the arctic coast of Alaska. The mean age of these subjects was 20. 8 (± 1. 26) years, mean height 169. 1 (± 5. 08) cm, mean weight 66. 6 (± 2. 0) kg and mean value for percent body fat 9. 1 (± 1. 08) %. These data show the effects of the sleep cycle on metabolism and body temperature. The sleeping metabolic rate declined from 50 {± 7. 35) kcal/m /hr at 2230 hours to 39 (± 5. 22) kcal/m²/hr at 0600 hours. Concomitantly, rectal temperature, which was negatively correlated with time (r = -. 965393), fell from 37. 0 (± . 386)°C at 2230 hours to 35. 4 (± . 386)°C by 0600 hours. Calculated mean body temperature was directly related to the level of metabolic activity. These coastal Eskimos had essentially normal values for early morning basal metabolic rates in contrast to Anaktuvuk Pass Eskimos from the interior of Alaska who are hypermetabolic.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.66-10
Documents
Less detail

A study of the maintenance of the thermal balance in the Eskimo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293238
Source
Ladd Air Force Base, Alaska. Technical Report 60-40
Publication Type
Report
Date
1960
Author
Milan, Frederick A.
Source
Ladd Air Force Base, Alaska. Technical Report 60-40
Date
1960
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Indigenous Groups
Inuit
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Body temperature
Notes
RC 1050 .U44 no.60-40
Less detail

Swedish Lappland: a brief description of the dwellings and winter-living techniques of the Swedish Mountain Lapps.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298751
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-7. 16 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1960
  1 document  
Author
Milan, Frederick A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-7. 16 p.
Date
October 1960
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Indigenous Groups
Saami
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1587287
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Lappland
Lapps (Sami)
Dwellings
Winter-living
Abstract
Extensive literature has been collected concerning the folkways, physical anthropology, and language of the Lapps. This literature dates from the Germania of the Greek historian Tacitus, and includes references to the Lapps in 13th Century Icelandic Sagas, works by Linnaeus (Karl von Linne), and the autobiographies: Muittalis samid birra, by Johan Turi, and En Nomad och Hans Liv, by Anta Pirak. From the foregoing description, it can be seen that some of the Lapps, especially the nomadic ones, are a meat-eating people, living an arduous life in the cold. In contrast to the Eskimos, who have under similar conditions, little is known about the physiology of the Lapps. This knowledge could be obtained through physiological field investigations. Both the Lapps and the Eskimos have adjusted culturally to their environment. Possibly the former have adjusted their physiology as well.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.60-7
Documents
Less detail

Thermal evaluation of footgear associated with the full pressure high altitude flying outfit A/P 22S-2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297177
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report AAL-TR-64-25.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1965
Author
Milan, Frederick A.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report AAL-TR-64-25.
Date
June 1965
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Humans
Footwear
Cold Temperature
Flightsuit
Less detail
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-10. 19 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
March 1961
  1 document  
Author
Milan, Frederick A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-10. 19 p.
Date
March 1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3555221
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Antarctica
Humans
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Body temperature
Abstract
Five experiments which investigated thermal balance in two clothed men in the cold were carried out at Little America V in the winter months of June and August. Environmental temperatures ranged between - 32° and -47° C, and wind velocities ranged between 2 and 17 miles per hour during the experiments. Despite the protective clothing worn and the heat productions of between 3 and 4.8 mets (measured by indirect calorimetry), total heat debt (obtained by measurements of rectal and skin temperatures) ranged between 105 and 126 kilocalories for exposures of 40 to 165 minutes in duration. Finger temperatures ranged between 7° and 18° C at the end of the experiments. The thermal demand of the environment on these seemingly adequately clothed men was high, and it is suggested that they were moderately cold stressed despite high rectal temperatures.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.60-10
Documents
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.