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Physicians' experiences with sickness absence certification in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309769
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Dec; 47(8):859-866
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2019
Author
Katariina Hinkka
Mikko Niemelä
Ilona Autti-Rämö
Heikki Palomäki
Author Affiliation
Research Department, Social Insurance Institution of Finland, Turku, Finland.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Dec; 47(8):859-866
Date
Dec-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Certification
Finland
Humans
Physicians - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave
Surveys and Questionnaires
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
Aims: The aim of this study was to explore Finnish physicians' perceptions of sickness absence (SA) certification. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to 50% of the physicians in Finland who provide care to working-age patients in a clinical practice setting. Of the 8867 physicians, 3089 responded. Physicians handling SA certification patients at least a few times per month were included (n = 2472). Results: At least a few times per month, 61% of all physicians perceived SA issues as problematic, 60% had experienced a lack of time in dealing with SA matters, 36% had disagreed with a patient on SA certification, and 36% had met a patient who wanted a SA certificate for reasons other than a disease or injury. Physicians were least worried about patients filing complaints (4%), exhibiting threatening behaviour (2%), or switching physicians for SA certification reasons (1%). A total of 60% of physicians had prescribed SA for a longer period than necessary because of long waiting times for further care/measures. Non-specialized physicians, general practitioners, and psychiatrists experienced problems more frequently than surgeons and occupational health physicians. Over 50% of the respondents had a fairly large or very large need to deepen their knowledge of social insurance matters. The need for national guidelines for all or some diseases was reported by 80% of the respondents. Conclusions: Many physicians perceive SA tasks as problematic and are unable to dedicate enough time to them. Shortcomings in physicians' sickness certification know-how, as well as obstacles in the healthcare and rehabilitation system, prolong the SA process. Attitudes towards the adoption of national guidelines on the duration of SA were positive.
PubMed ID
29485317 View in PubMed
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Sickness absence as a predictor of disability retirement in different occupational classes: a register-based study of a working-age cohort in Finland in 2007-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300073
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 05 09; 8(5):e020491
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-09-2018
Author
Laura Salonen
Jenni Blomgren
Mikko Laaksonen
Mikko Niemelä
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Research, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 05 09; 8(5):e020491
Date
05-09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Employment
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of the study was to examine diagnosis-specific sickness absences of different lengths as predictors of disability retirement in different occupational classes.
Register-based prospective cohort study up to 8 years of follow-up.
A 70% random sample of the non-retired Finnish population aged 25-62 at the end of 2006 was included (n=1 727 644) and linked to data on sickness absences in 2005 and data on disability retirement in 2007-2014.
Cox proportional hazards regression was utilised to analyse the association of sickness absence with the risk of all-cause disability retirement during an 8-year follow-up.
The risk of disability retirement increased with increasing lengths of sickness absence in all occupational classes. A long sickness absence was a particularly strong predictor of disability retirement in upper non-manual employees as among those with over 180 sickness absence days the HR was 9.19 (95% CI 7.40 to 11.40), but in manual employees the HR was 3.51 (95% CI 3.23 to 3.81) in men. Among women, the corresponding HRs were 7.26 (95% CI 6.16 to 8.57) and 3.94 (95% CI 3.60 to 4.30), respectively. Adjusting for the diagnosis of sickness absence partly attenuated the association between the length of sickness absence and the risk of disability retirement in all employed groups.
A long sickness absence is a strong predictor of disability retirement in all occupational classes. Preventing the accumulation of sickness absence days and designing more efficient policies for different occupational classes may be crucial to reduce the number of transitions to early retirement due to disability.
PubMed ID
29743328 View in PubMed
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