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Anticholinergic drug use and its association with self-reported symptoms among older persons with and without diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298928
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Niina-Mari Inkeri
Merja Karjalainen
Maija Haanpää
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Miia Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Male
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Anticholinergic drug use has been associated with a risk of central and peripheral adverse effects. There is a lack of information on anticholinergic drug use in persons with diabetes. The aim of this study is to investigate anticholinergic drug use and the association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes.
The basic population was comprised of Finnish community-dwelling primary care patients aged 65 and older. Persons with diabetes were identified according to the ICD-10 diagnostic codes from electronic patient records. Two controls adjusted by age and gender were selected for each person with diabetes. This cross-sectional study was based on electronic primary care patient records and a structured health questionnaire. The health questionnaire was returned by 430 (81.6%) persons with diabetes and 654 (73.5%) persons without diabetes. Data on prescribed drugs were obtained from the electronic patient records. Anticholinergic drug use was measured according to the Anticholinergic Risk Scale. The presence and strength of anticholinergic symptoms were asked in the health questionnaire.
The prevalence of anticholinergic drug use was 8.9% in the total study cohort. There were no significant differences in anticholinergic drug use between persons with and without diabetes. There was no consistent association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms.
There is no difference in anticholinergic drug use in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes. Anticholinergic drug use should be considered individually and monitored carefully.
PubMed ID
30315583 View in PubMed
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Chair rise capacity and associated factors in older home-care clients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296121
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Nov; 46(7):699-703
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Miia Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Irma Nykänen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Nov; 46(7):699-703
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Educational Status
Exercise Test
Female
Finland
Home Care Services
Humans
Male
Nutritional Status
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of older home-care clients to perform the five times chair rise test and associated personal characteristics, nutritional status and functioning.
The study sample included 267 home-care clients aged =75?years living in Eastern and Central Finland. The home-care clients were interviewed at home by home-care nurses, nutritionists and pharmacists. The collected data contained sociodemographic factors, functional ability (Barthel Index, IADL), cognitive functioning (MMSE), nutritional status (MNA), depressive symptoms (GDS-15), medical diagnoses and drug use. The primary outcome was the ability to perform the five times chair rise test.
Fifty-one per cent ( n=135) of the home-care clients were unable to complete the five times chair rise test. Twenty-three per cent ( n=64) of the home-care clients had good chair rise capacity (=17?seconds). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, fewer years of education (odds ratio [OR]?=?1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.18), lower ADL (OR?=?1.54, 95% CI 1.34-1.78) and low MNA scores (OR?=?1.12, 95% CI 1.04-1.20) and a higher number of co-morbidities (OR?=?1.21, 95% CI 1.02-1.43) were associated with inability to complete the five times chair rise test.
Poor functional mobility, which was associated with less education, a high number of co-morbidities and poor nutritional status, was common among older home-care clients. To maintain and to prevent further decline in functional mobility, physical training and nutritional services are needed. (NutOrMed, ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02214758).
PubMed ID
28699419 View in PubMed
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Discrepancies between in-home interviews and electronic medical records on regularly used drugs among home care clients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277676
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2016 Jan;25(1):100-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Miia Tiihonen
Irma Nykänen
Riitta Ahonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2016 Jan;25(1):100-5
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Electronic Health Records - standards - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Home Care Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Prescription Drugs - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Self Administration - statistics & numerical data
Self Report
Abstract
To compare discrepancies between in-home interviews and electronic medical records (EMRs) on regularly used prescription drugs among older home care clients.
The participants were home care clients aged 75?years or older living in three Finnish municipalities. In-home interview data on regular prescription drug use from 276 home care clients were compared with EMRs. Agreement between the in-home interview data and EMRs was assessed using Cohen's kappa.
A majority (83%, n?=?229) of the home care clients had discrepancies between in-home interview data and EMRs, and 40% had discrepancies that could clinically compromise their treatment. Living with a spouse or other family member, use of private health care services, diagnosed asthma/COPD or excessive polypharmacy was associated with having discrepancies. Discrepancies were more common among clients with better functioning and ability to self-manage drug use. Agreement between in-home interview data and EMRs was very good or good for other drug groups, but moderate for opioids, paracetamol, benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-related drugs and lubricant eye drops, and poor for selective beta-2-adrenoceptor agonists. The most common clinically important discrepancies were psychotropics, opioids and agents acting on the renin-angiotensin system and beta-blocking agents.
Eight out of ten home care clients had discrepancies between in-home interview data and EMRs. Of these discrepancies, 40% were clinically important.
PubMed ID
26541247 View in PubMed
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From systemic hormone therapy to vaginal estrogen - a nationwide register study in Finland, 2003-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261357
Source
Maturitas. 2014 Aug;78(4):293-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Elisa Holm
Katri Aaltonen
Anna-Mari Heikkinen
Miia Tiihonen
Source
Maturitas. 2014 Aug;78(4):293-7
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Intravaginal
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Estrogen Receptor Modulators - administration & dosage
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - utilization
Estrogens - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Norpregnenes - administration & dosage
Prescriptions
Registries
Vagina
Abstract
To assess the patterns of use of reimbursed systemic hormone therapy (HT) and vaginal estrogen preparations among women aged 45 and older in Finland.
Reimbursed purchases of prescribed systemic HT and vaginal estrogen preparations for the years 2003-2012 were obtained from a nationwide prescription registry. Systemic preparations included estrogen patches, gels and tablets, tibolone, continuous combination preparations and sequential combination preparations. Prescribed vaginal estrogens included a vaginal ring and vaginal tablets.
Annual period prevalence for systemic HT and vaginal estrogen use.
The total prevalence of prescribed HT use remained relatively constant (at 26-27%) throughout the studied period, but the share of women using systemic preparations decreased from 21% to 12%, while the share of women using vaginal estrogens increased from 9% to 19%. Decreases were observed for all classes of systemic preparations, although the decrease was largest for sequential combination preparations (from 4.9% to 1.6%) and estrogen tablets (from 5.2% to 2.9%). Continuous combination preparations remained the most commonly used types of systemic preparation (5.4-4.2%). Systemic HT use decreased most among 45-49 year old women (9.5-4.3%), while the use of vaginal estrogens increased most among those aged 65 and over.
Based on the register data, the trends in HT use indicate changed prescribing patterns in accordance with clinical guidelines. It is notable that since 2009, vaginal estrogen was more commonly prescribed than systemic HT.
PubMed ID
24934885 View in PubMed
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Glycemic control and health-related quality of life among older home-dwelling primary care patients with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293508
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Dec; 11(6):577-582
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Anna-Kaisa Aro
Merja Karjalainen
Miia Tiihonen
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Maija Haanpää
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, General Practice, University of Eastern Finland, Finland; Rantakylä Health Center, Siunsote, Finland. Electronic address: koistine@student.uef.fi.
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Dec; 11(6):577-582
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Glycated Hemoglobin A - metabolism
Humans
Independent living
Male
Mental health
Mental Status and Dementia Tests
Mobility Limitation
Predictive value of tests
Primary Health Care
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Self Care - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and functional capacity in relation to glycemic control among older home-dwelling primary care patients.
Electronic patient records were used to identify 527 people over 65 years with diabetes. Of these, 259 randomly selected subjects were invited to a health examination and 172 of them attended and provided complete data. The participants were divided into three groups based on the HbA1c: good (HbA1c57mmol/mol (N=29)) glycemic control. HRQoL was measured with the EuroQol EQ-5D questionnaire. Functional and cognitive capacity and mental well-being were assessed with the Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) scale, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15).
EQ-5D scores for good, intermediate and poor glycemic control were 0.78; 0.74 and 0.70, p=0.037. Sub-items of mobility (p=0.002) and self-care were the most affected (p=0.031). Corresponding trend was found for IADL, p=0.008. A significant correlation was found between MMSE scores and HbA1c.
Older primary care home-dwelling patients with diabetes and poorer glycemic control have lower functional capacity and HRQoL, especially in regard to mobility and self-care.
PubMed ID
28754430 View in PubMed
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Incidence and Duration of Cumulative Bisphosphonate Use among Community-Dwelling Persons with or without Alzheimer's Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279787
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2016;52(1):127-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Miia Tiihonen
Heidi Taipale
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2016;52(1):127-32
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications - epidemiology
Bone Density Conservation Agents - therapeutic use
Bone Diseases - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Databases, Pharmaceutical
Diphosphonates - therapeutic use
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Time Factors
Abstract
We studied the incidence and duration of cumulative bisphosphonate use among older Finnish women and men with or without Alzheimer's disease (AD). The MEDALZ-2005 cohort is a nationwide sample of all persons with clinically diagnosed AD on 31 December 2005 and their age-, gender-, and region of residence-matched control persons without AD. Information on bisphosphonate use by persons with an AD diagnosis and their controls without AD during 2002-2009 was obtained from the prescription register database containing reimbursed medications. A total of 6,041 (11.8%) persons used bisphosphonates during the 8-year follow-up. Bisphosphonates were more commonly used among persons without AD (n?=?3121, 12.3%) than among persons with AD (n?=?2,920, 11.2%) (p?=?0.001). The median duration of bisphosphonate use was 743 days (IQR). Among persons with AD, the median duration of use was 777 days (IQR) and among persons without AD, 701 days (IQR) (p?=?0.011). People without AD more often used bisphosphonate combination preparations including vitamin D than did people with AD (p?
PubMed ID
26967224 View in PubMed
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Incidence of Bisphosphonate Use in Relation to Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease in Community-Dwelling Persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294596
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 09; 64(9):e48-9
Publication Type
Letter
Date
09-2016

Information sources used by women in Finland who use hormonal contraceptives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147650
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2010 Feb;32(1):66-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Miia Tiihonen
Anna-Mari Heikkinen
Hanna-Mari Leppänen
Riitta Ahonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Pharmacy, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio, Finland. miia.tiihonen@uku.fi
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2010 Feb;32(1):66-72
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Consumer Health Information - trends
Contraceptives, Oral, Hormonal - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Family
Female
Finland
Friends
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel
Humans
Internet
Mass Media
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Professional Role
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine information sources used by women who use hormonal contraceptives (HCs), and how information source affected women's attitudes and perceptions in 2001 and 2007.
The questionnaires were distributed from university pharmacies in 12 large cities across Finland.
The data were collected with two questionnaire surveys among women who used hormonal contraceptives in 2001 and 2007. In the 2001 survey the response rate was 53% (n = 264) and in the 2007 survey 55% (n = 436).
The number of respondents who considered professional information sources the most important information sources was markedly bigger in 2007 than in 2001 (P = 0.005). The most common source of information concerning the benefits of hormonal contraceptives was a physician (2001: 43%, 2007: 53%). The most common source of information concerning the risks of hormonal contraceptives was friends and relatives (43%) in 2001 and physician in 2007 (35%). Only a few percent of the respondents considered a pharmacy the most important information source both the 2001 and 2007 surveys.
The importance of health care professionals as sources of information concerning hormonal contraceptives has increased. However, role of pharmacists as information source was surprisingly small. Women who use hormonal contraceptives need more information from professional sources to alleviate possible fears associated with use.
PubMed ID
19876757 View in PubMed
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Long-term use of proton pump inhibitors among community-dwelling persons with and without Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291615
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2017 Sep; 73(9):1149-1158
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Heidi Juntunen
Heidi Taipale
Antti Tanskanen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Miia Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland, P.O.B 1627, -70211, Kuopio, FI, Finland.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2017 Sep; 73(9):1149-1158
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy
Diphosphonates - therapeutic use
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Finland
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Models, Theoretical
Proton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Registries
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Abstract
The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of use and long-term use (=180 days) of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and associated factors among community-dwellers with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD).
MEDALZ cohort encompassed all persons who received a verified diagnosis of AD in Finland during the years 2005-2011 and their age-, sex-, and region of residence-matched comparison persons, including 69,353 persons with and 69,353 persons without AD. Data was derived from several Finnish administrative registers. A mathematical modelling method, PRE2DUP, was used for converting dispensing data to drug use periods (when regular PPI use started and ended). Morbid conditions and concomitant drugs associated with use and long-term use of PPIs were assessed with logistic regression models.
Use of PPIs was more common among comparison persons than persons with AD (39.0 and 35.8%, respectively, p 
Notes
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PubMed ID
28577224 View in PubMed
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Menopausal hormone therapy--benefits, adverse reactions, concerns and information sources in 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133252
Source
Maturitas. 2011 Sep;70(1):69-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Miia Tiihonen
Minna Saarela
Suvi Saarinen
Riitta Ahonen
Anna-Mari Heikkinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. miia.tiihonen@uef.fi
Source
Maturitas. 2011 Sep;70(1):69-73
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Intravaginal
Adult
Aged
Communication
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - adverse effects - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Fear
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Menopause
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine hormone therapy (HT) users' experiences, perceptions and information sources in 2009.
Questionnaire survey was conducted in 2009 among women using HT. The questionnaire (n=500) was distributed from pharmacies across Finland. The response rate was 58% (n=281).
The survey measured self-reported benefits and adverse reactions, fears and information sources.
The number of systemic HT users reporting fears was 50% (n=99). The most common fear was breast cancer (27%). Systemic HT users who had considered discontinuation of HT or had temporarily discontinued HT experienced fears more often than other respondents (p
PubMed ID
21723053 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.