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ADHD and comorbid disorders in relation to family environment and symptom severity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78209
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2007 Mar 30;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-2007
Author
HurtigTuula
EbelingHanna
TaanilaAnja
MiettunenJouko
SmalleySusan
McGoughJames
LooSandra
JärvelinMarjo-Riitta
MoilanenIrma
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2007 Mar 30;
Date
Mar-30-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To examine the comorbidity of ADHD in association with family environment and the severity of ADHD. METHOD: A screening for ADHD symptoms was conducted among adolescents in the Northern Finland 1986 Birth Cohort (N = 6622). A sample of those adolescents (n = 457), aged 16-18 years, with and without ADHD symptoms was assessed with a diagnostic interview (Kiddie-SADS-PL) and ADHD and comorbid disorders were studied in association with the family characteristics and the number of ADHD symptoms. RESULTS: Adolescents with ADHD had more commonly conduct disorder (P
PubMed ID
17401612 View in PubMed
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Associations between early development and outcome in schizophrenia - A 35-year follow-up of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84927
Source
Schizophr Res. 2008 Jan 2;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2-2008
Author
JääskeläinenErika
MiettunenJouko
VeijolaJuha
McGrathJohn J
MurrayGraham K
JonesPeter B
IsohanniMatti
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Finland, P.O. BOX 5000, 90014 University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Schizophr Res. 2008 Jan 2;
Date
Jan-2-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Delayed neuromotor development carries an increased risk of developing schizophrenia, and some authors have assumed that risk factors for schizophrenia such as delayed development are also prognostic indicators for patients with established illness. In those who do develop schizophrenia, it is not clear if these same early developmental markers influence the outcome of illness. Our aim was to examine the association between infant developmental milestones and a range of outcomes in patients with schizophrenia. Our sample was drawn from Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort and included 109 subjects for whom prospectively collected information on age of learning to stand, walk and talk was available and who had developed schizophrenia by the age 35 years. By utilizing national registers we examined outcomes related to service utilization, educational achievement, and occupational status. Age of illness onset was also analyzed. Based on the diagnostic interview, a subgroup of 59 cases was assessed in clinical examinations on functioning and quality of life. Contrary to a widespread assumption within the field of schizophrenia research, later attainment of developmental milestones was not associated with poor outcome. We conclude that risk factors for schizophrenia are not necessarily prognostic factors.
PubMed ID
18180143 View in PubMed
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Associations between psychotic-like symptoms and inattention/hyperactivity symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94794
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2009 Nov 12;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-12-2009
Author
HurtigTuula
TaanilaAnja
VeijolaJuha
EbelingHanna
MäkiPirjo
MiettunenJouko
KaakinenMarika
JoukamaaMatti
ThermanSebastian
HeinimaaMarkus
JärvelinMarjo-Riitta
MoilanenIrma
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland, tuula.hurtig@oulu.fi.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2009 Nov 12;
Date
Nov-12-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to study the association between psychotic-like symptoms and inattention/hyperactivity symptoms in a general adolescent population. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The sample is based on a population-based prospective mother-child birth cohort, the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. In the 15-16-year follow-up survey, the adolescents completed the Youth Self-Report questionnaire as well as the PROD-Screen questionnaire that addressed prodromal symptoms of psychosis. Meanwhile, their parents assessed inattention and hyperactive symptoms of their offspring by completing the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD Symptoms and Normal Behaviors questionnaire (N = 5,318). The cross-sectional associations between psychotic-like symptoms and inattention/hyperactivity symptoms were studied with logistic regression models. RESULTS: The association between negative psychotic-like symptoms and inattention symptoms, especially the dreamy type of inattention symptoms (e.g., difficulties in organizing tasks, losing things, being forgetful), was statistically significant for both genders. Psychotic-like symptoms, however, were not associated with hyperactivity symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The present findings demonstrate that an association between psychotic-like symptoms and attentional dysfunction, which has been found in clinical samples, is also present in a general adolescent population.
PubMed ID
19907910 View in PubMed
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Do inattention and hyperactivity symptoms equal scholastic impairment? evidence from three European cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84295
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007 Nov 13;7(1):327
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-13-2007
Author
RodriguezAlina
JarvelinMarjo-Riitta
ObelCarsten
TaanilaAnja
MiettunenJouko
MoilanenIrma
Brink HenriksenTine
PietilainenKatri
EbelingHanna
KotimaaArto
Markussen LinnetKaren
OlsenJorn
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007 Nov 13;7(1):327
Date
Nov-13-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Attention Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) affects many children, adolescents, and adults and is associated with a number of impairments. Poor academic performance is related to ADHD in clinical samples. However, it is unclear to what extent core ADHD symptoms and scholastic impairment are related in non-referred school-aged children. METHODS: Data come from three population-based cohorts from Sweden, Denmark, and Finland, which are part of the Nordic Network on ADHD. The combined sample size was 13,087 children who were studied at ages 7-8 or 10-12 years. Teachers rated children on inattention and hyperactivity symptoms and reported children's scholastic performance on basic skills. RESULTS: There was a significant association in all cohorts between core ADHD symptoms and scholastic impairment in reading, writing, and mathematics. Particularly, inattention was related to a two to tenfold increase in scholastic impairment. Prevalence of hyperactivity symptoms was similar across the three cohorts, but inattention was lowest among children from the Finnish cohort, after stratification on living conditions. CONCLUSIONS: These results extend previous reports of scholastic impairment among children with clinically diagnosed ADHD to non-referred population samples from three European countries. Surveillance policies should be implemented in school systems to catch children in need of behavioral or scholastic support early.
PubMed ID
17999767 View in PubMed
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Morphometric Brain Abnormalities in Schizophrenia in a Population-Based Sample: Relationship to Duration of Illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91222
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2008 Nov 17;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-17-2008
Author
TanskanenPäivikki
RidlerKhanum
MurrayGraham K
HaapeaMarianne
VeijolaJuha M
JääskeläinenErika
MiettunenJouko
JonesPeter B
BullmoreEdward T
IsohanniMatti K
Author Affiliation
2Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Oulu, FIN-90029 OYS, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2008 Nov 17;
Date
Nov-17-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Biased recruitment and sample selection may cause variability in neuroimaging studies. Epidemiologically principled population-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of schizophrenia are very rare. We gathered structural MRI data on 154 subjects from the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort, aged 33-35 (100 controls, 54 schizophrenia patients). Regional differences in density of gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were identified between groups using nonparametric statistical analysis, and the relationship of the regional differences to duration of illness was explored. Gray matter reductions were found bilaterally in the cerebellum, thalamus, basal ganglia, middle frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, insula, superior temporal gyrus, fusiform gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, cuneus, and lingual gyrus; in the left posterior cingulate, superior frontal gyrus, transverse temporal gyrus, and precuneus; and in the right postcentral gyrus. Gray matter excesses were observed bilaterally in the basal ganglia, anterior cingulate, and medial orbitofrontal cortices. There were white matter deficits in an extensive network including inter- and intrahemispheric tracts bilaterally in the frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes, subcortical structures, cerebellum, and brain stem. CSF excesses were found bilaterally in the lateral ventricles, third ventricle, interhemispheric, and left Sylvian fissure. We replicated the previous findings of structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia on a general population level. Gray and white matter deficits were associated with duration of illness suggesting either that developmental brain deficits relate to an earlier age of onset or that brain abnormalities in schizophrenia are progressive in nature.
PubMed ID
19015212 View in PubMed
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Rate of Cannabis Use Disorders in Clinical Samples of Patients With Schizophrenia: A Meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89262
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2009 Apr 22;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-22-2009
Author
KoskinenJohanna
LöhönenJohanna
KoponenHannu
IsohanniMatti
MiettunenJouko
Author Affiliation
2Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2009 Apr 22;
Date
Apr-22-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Objective: Our aim was to review recent studies and estimate the rate of cannabis use disorders (CUDs) in schizophrenia, as well as to examine the factors affecting this rate. Methods: We conducted an electronic search of 3 literature databases and a manual search of articles from 1996 to 2008. The key words used were "schizophreni*," "psychos*s," "psychotic," "cannabis abuse," "cannabis dependence," "cannabis use disorder," "substance use disorder," "substance abuse," "substance dependence," and "dual diagnosis." Articles that reported diagnoses according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or International Classification of Diseases were included. Regression analysis was used to examine how estimated rates of CUDs are affected by various study characteristics such as the classification system, inpatient vs outpatient status, study location, proportion of males, age of the sample, or duration of illness. Results: Thirty-five studies met our search criteria. The median current rate of CUDs was 16.0% (interquartile range [IQR] = 8.6-28.6, 10 studies), and the median lifetime rate was 27.1% (IQR = 12.2-38.5, 28 studies). The median rate of CUDs was markedly higher in first-episode vs long-term patients (current 28.6%/22.0%, lifetime 44.4%/12.2%, respectively) and in studies where more than two-thirds of the participants were males than in the other studies (33.8%/13.2%). CUDs were also more common in younger samples than in the others (current 38.5%/16.0%, lifetime 45.0%/17.9%). Conclusions: Approximately every fourth schizophrenia patient in our sample of studies had a diagnosis of CUDs. CUDs were especially common in younger and first-episode patient samples as well as in samples with a high proportion of males.
PubMed ID
19386576 View in PubMed
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Suicide rate in schizophrenia in the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89547
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2009 Mar 25;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-25-2009
Author
AlaräisänenAntti
MiettunenJouko
RäsänenPirkko
FentonWayne
Koivumaa-HonkanenHeli-Tuulie
IsohanniMatti
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014, Oulu, Finland, antti.alaraisanen@oulu.fi.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2009 Mar 25;
Date
Mar-25-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Suicide rate among schizophrenia patients may vary for several reasons, one of the most important being the time point of the suicide during the illness process. However, prospective studies on suicide risk in population-based cohort of individuals with new-onset schizophrenia have been lacking. METHOD: The data were collected for 10,934 individuals alive in Finland at the age of 16 from the genetically homogenous, population-based Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort ascertained already during mid-pregnancy. The Finnish Hospital Discharge Register was used until the end of 1997 (age 31) to identify cases with mental disorder. Case records were scrutinized and diagnoses were re-checked for DSM-III-R criteria. One hundred subjects met the DSM-III-R criteria for schizophrenia. Deaths by the end of year 2005 (age 39) were ascertained from death certificates. RESULTS: Suicides (n = 7) accounted for 50% of all the deaths at age from 16 to 39. Seven (7.0%) subjects with schizophrenia had committed suicide; suicide rate being 2.9% (1/35) for women and 9.2% (6/65) for men. Furthermore, 71% of suicides in schizophrenia occurred during the first 3 years after onset of illness. CONCLUSION: The suicide rate for patients with new-onset schizophrenia followed until the age of 39 was high and accounted for half of the deaths. Great majority of the suicides took place during the first years of the illness.
PubMed ID
19319456 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.