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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Arctic trichinosis: Two Alaskan outbreaks from walrus meat

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1566
Source
Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1979 Jan;139(1):102-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1979
Author
Margolis, HS
Middaugh, JP
Burgess, RD
Author Affiliation
U.S. Centers for Disease Control
Source
Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1979 Jan;139(1):102-105
Date
Jan-1979
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Barrow
Diet, traditional
Epidemics
Trichinella spiralis
Trichinosis
Zoonosis
Alaska
Animals
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Reservoirs
Eosinophilia - complications
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Flocculation Tests
Humans
Male
Pinnipedia - parasitology
Prednisone - therapeutic use
Thiabendazole - therapeutic use
Trichinellosis - diagnosis - drug therapy - transmission
Walruses - parasitology
Abstract
The arctic form of Trichinella spiralis that infects terrestrial and marine mammals is of importance in public health because persons living in arctic regions still depend on wild animals for economic subsistence. In 1975, an extended common-source epidemic of trichinosis attributed to consumption of walrus meat involved 29 persons in Barrow, Alaska. Of those persons eating this meat, 64% became ill, and the rate of infection of persons eating meat prepared with little or no cooking was four times as great as that of persons eating cooked meat. One year later a second outbreak occurred when a family ate partially cooked meat from an infected walrus. Clinical illness differed little from the disease acquired in temperature climates; however, only 70% had a positive bentonite flocculation titer, whereas 96% had eosinophilia. These epidemics of trichinosis are the first reported in Alaska to be associated with the consumption of walrus meat.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2110.
PubMed ID
571446 View in PubMed
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Botulism outbreak associated with eating fermented food - Alaska 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87955
Source
MMWR Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2001;50(52):680-682.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001

Cardiovascular deaths among Alaskan Natives, 1980-86

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6912
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1990 Mar;80(3):282-285
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
  1 website  
Author
Middaugh, JP
Author Affiliation
Section of Epidemiology, Department of Health and Social Services, State of Alaska, Anchorage 99524-0249.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1990 Mar;80(3):282-285
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology - mortality
Death Certificates
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Survival Rate
Abstract
Average annual, age-adjusted death rates from cardiovascular diseases and atherosclerosis from 1980-86 among Alaskan Natives were lower than rates among other Alaskans (162.0 vs 242.1; RR = 0.67), while death rates from other causes were higher (954.4 vs 618.6; RR = 1.54). These suggest that Alaskan Natives have less cardiovascular disease than other populations. Additional research on the role of marine omega-3 fatty acids is needed.
PubMed ID
2305905 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Fetal alcohol syndrome in Alaska, 1977 through 1992: An administrative prevalence derived from multiple data sources

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4422
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1998 May;88(5):781-786
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
  1 website  
Author
Egeland, GM
Perham-Hester, KA
Gessner, BD
Ingle, D
Berner, JE
Middaugh, JP
Author Affiliation
National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, AK, USA.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1998 May;88(5):781-786
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Population Surveillance - methods
Prevalence
United States
United States Indian Health Service
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The prevalence and characteristics of fetal alcohol syndrome cases and the usefulness of various data sources in surveillance were examined in Alaska to guide prevention and future surveillance efforts. METHODS: Sixteen data sources in Alaska were used to identify children with fetal alcohol syndrome. Medical charts were reviewed to verify cases, and records were reviewed to provide descriptive data. RESULTS: Fetal alcohol syndrome rates varied markedly by birth year and race, with the highest prevalence (4.1 per 1000 live births) found among Alaska Natives born between 1985 and 1988. Screening and referral programs to diagnostic clinics identified 70% of all recorded cases. The intervention program for children 0 to 3 years of age detected 29% of age-appropriate cases, and Medicaid data identified 11% of all cases; birth certificates detected only 9% of the age-appropriate cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate a high prevalence of fetal alcohol syndrome in Alaska and illustrate that reliance on any one data source would lead to underestimates of the extent of fetal alcohol syndrome in a population.
PubMed ID
9585745 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Human biomonitoring to optimize fish consumption advice: Reducing uncertainty when evaluating benefits and risks

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3086
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Mar;95(3):393-397
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
  1 website  
Author
Arnold, SM
Lynn, TV
Verbrugge, LA
Middaugh, JP
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology, 3601 C St, Ste 540, PO Box 240249 Anchorage, AK 99524-0249, USA. scott_arnold@health.state.ak.us
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Mar;95(3):393-397
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Chemistry, Analytical - trends
Counseling - standards
Environmental Monitoring - methods - standards
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - poisoning
Female
Fishes
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Mass Screening
Mercury Poisoning - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Methylmercury Compounds - adverse effects - analysis - poisoning
Middle Aged
No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level
Nutrition - education
Nutrition Policy - trends
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Public Health - standards - trends
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Seafood - adverse effects - analysis - poisoning
Uncertainty
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
National fish consumption advisories that are based solely on assessment of risk of exposure to contaminants without consideration of consumption benefits result in overly restrictive advice that discourages eating fish even in areas where such advice is unwarranted. In fact, generic fish advisories may have adverse public health consequences because of decreased fish consumption and substitution of foods that are less healthy. Public health is on the threshold of a new era for determining actual exposures to environmental contaminants, owing to technological advances in analytical chemistry. It is now possible to target fish consumption advice to specific at-risk populations by evaluating individual contaminant exposures and health risk factors. Because of the current epidemic of nutritionally linked disease, such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, general recommendations for limiting fish consumption are ill conceived and potentially dangerous.
Notes
Comment In: American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Aug;95(8):1304; author reply 1304-1305
PubMed ID
15727965 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Suicides in Alaska: Firearms and alcohol

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3689
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1988 Feb;78(2):179-180
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
  1 website  
Author
Hlady, WG
Middaugh, JP
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Social Services, State of Alaska, Anchorage 99524-0249.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1988 Feb;78(2):179-180
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology
Female
Firearms
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Suicide - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
A manual review of death certificates and autopsy records identified 195 suicides in Alaska during 1983-84. Native males, 20-24 years old, had the highest rate of suicide (257 per 100,000 person-years). Gunshot wounds caused 76 per cent of all suicide deaths; 79 per cent of Native and 48 per cent of White suicides had detectable levels of blood alcohol. Suicide by firearms was weakly associated with blood alcohol levels above 100 mg/dl (odds ratio 1.3, 95 per cent confidence interval 1.11-1.47).
PubMed ID
3337334 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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6 records – page 1 of 1.