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A 6 year longitudinal study of accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary time in Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272785
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2015 Sep;18(5):553-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Maria Hagströmer
Lydia Kwak
Pekka Oja
Michael Sjöström
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2015 Sep;18(5):553-7
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Sedentary lifestyle
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate changes over six years in physical activity and sedentary behavior assessed with accelerometry in a representative sample of Swedish adults.
A longitudinal study over six years.
The cohort consisted of 1172 participants (46% males) in 2002 and 511 participants (46% males) in 2008, of which 478 (45% males) had valid data on both occasions. Mean (SD) age at baseline was 45 (15) years. To analyze changes over time, a mixed linear model for average intensity physical activity (counts/min) and time in sedentary behavior and light- and moderate- or higher-intensity physical activity was conducted, stratified for sex and age, and adjusted for BMI, education, self-rated health and ? wear time.
Over a six year period no significant changes were seen in the total cohort for average intensity and time in moderate- or higher intensity physical activity. A significant decrease in average intensity physical activity was found for men (p=0.006) and those aged 60+ years at baseline (p
PubMed ID
25277849 View in PubMed
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Accelerometer-measured sedentary time and physical activity-A 15 year follow-up of mortality in a Swedish population-based cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294710
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2018 Jul; 21(7):702-707
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2018
Author
Ing-Mari Dohrn
Michael Sjöström
Lydia Kwak
Pekka Oja
Maria Hagströmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. Electronic address: ing-mari.dohrn@ki.se.
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2018 Jul; 21(7):702-707
Date
Jul-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Exercise
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate the associations of objectively assessed sedentary time, light intensity physical activity (PA), moderate to vigorous intensity PA (MVPA), and total PA with all-cause mortality and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) or cancer in a Swedish population-based cohort with 15 years follow-up time.
Longitudinal prospective cohort study.
Data from 851 persons (56% women) =35 years at baseline were included. Primary exposure variables were time (min/day) spent sedentary, in light intensity PA and in MVPA, and total counts from an Actigraph 7164 accelerometer. Data on all-cause mortality and mortality from CVD or cancer were obtained from Swedish registers. Cox proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HR) of mortality with 95% confidence intervals (CI).
Compared with the least sedentary participants, those in the most sedentary tertile had an increased risk of all-cause mortality, HR: 2.7 (1.4, 5.3), CVD mortality, HR: 5.5 (1.4, 21.2) and cancer mortality, HR: 4.3 (1.2, 16.0). For all-cause mortality, those in the highest light intensity PA tertile had a HR 0.34 (0.17, 0.67) compared with the lowest tertile. A similar pattern was found for CVD and cancer mortality. More time spent in MVPA was associated with the largest risk reduction for CVD mortality, with an almost 90% lower risk in the tertile with the most time in MVPA.
This study confirms a strong inverse relationship between MVPA and mortality, and adds new insight for the understanding of the associations between sedentary time and light intensity PA and mortality.
PubMed ID
29128418 View in PubMed
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Active commuting to school in children and adolescents: an opportunity to increase physical activity and fitness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140649
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Dec;38(8):873-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Palma Chillón
Francisco B Ortega
Jonatan R Ruiz
Toomas Veidebaum
Leila Oja
Jarek Mäestu
Michael Sjöström
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Education and Sport, School of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. pchillon@ugr.es
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Dec;38(8):873-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bicycling - physiology
Child
Estonia
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Test
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Questionnaires
Schools
Sweden
Transportation
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The purpose was to describe the patterns of commuting to school in young people and to examine its associations with physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fitness.
The sample comprised 2271 Estonian and Swedish children and adolescents (1218 females) aged 9-10 years and 15-16 years. Data were collected in 1998/99. Mode of commuting to and from school was assessed by questionnaire. Time spent (min/day) in PA and average PA (counts/min) was measured by accelerometry. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed by means of a maximal cycle ergometer test.
Sixty-one percent of the participants reported active commuting to school (ACS). Estonian youth showed lower levels of ACS than Swedish (odds ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.53-0.76) and girls reported lower levels than boys (0.74; 0.62-0.88). ACS boys showed higher PA levels than non-ACS boys for moderate, vigorous, MVPA, and average PA levels (all p = 0.01). Participants who cycled to school had higher cardiorespiratory fitness than walkers or passive travellers (p
PubMed ID
20855356 View in PubMed
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Associations between physical activity, fitness, and academic achievement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149403
Source
J Pediatr. 2009 Dec;155(6):914-918.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Lydia Kwak
Stef P J Kremers
Patrick Bergman
Jonatan R Ruiz
Nico S Rizzo
Michael Sjöström
Author Affiliation
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. lydia.kwak@ki.se
Source
J Pediatr. 2009 Dec;155(6):914-918.e1
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Exercise
Exercise Test
Exercise Tolerance
Family
Female
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Male
Physical Fitness
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
To explore the associations between objectively assessed intensity levels of physical activity and academic achievement and test whether cardiovascular fitness mediates the association between physical activity and academic achievement.
Cross-sectional data were gathered in Swedish 9th-grade students (n = 232; mean age = 16 years; 52% girls). School grades, pubertal phase, skinfold thickness, cardiovascular fitness, and physical activity were measured objectively. Mother's education, family structure, and parental monitoring were self-reported. Data were analyzed with linear regression analyses.
After controlling for confounding factors, academic achievement was associated with vigorous physical activity in girls (beta = .30, P
PubMed ID
19643438 View in PubMed
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Associations of season and region on objectively assessed physical activity and sedentary behaviour.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257447
Source
J Sports Sci. 2014;32(7):629-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Maria Hagströmer
Nico S Rizzo
Michael Sjöström
Author Affiliation
a Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy , Karolinska Institutet , Huddinge , Sweden.
Source
J Sports Sci. 2014;32(7):629-34
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Exertion
Seasons
Sedentary lifestyle
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Seasonal and regional variation may influence physical activity (PA) patterns. These associations are in need of further investigation. The objective of the current study was to examine the association of season and region on objectively measured PA. The study was designed as a cross-sectional study with 1172 participants living in Sweden. Data on PA were collected throughout a calendar year using accelerometry. Regions were categorised as south (Götaland), central (Svealand) and north (Norrland). Outcome variables included accelerometer-measured mean counts per minute, sedentary time and time in low intensity and moderate-intensity physical activity (MVPA) or greater. ANCOVA was used to determine the associations of season and region with PA, adjusting for sex, age, body mass index (BMI) and education. The results showed that during the Spring season more time was spent in MVPA than during the Autumn. For participants living in the south of Sweden, a significant trend for season was found for MVPA, with Spring having the highest MVPA (P = 0.025). Season had a borderline significant association with MVPA or higher intensity activities (P = 0.051). No significant effects of region or season on total PA, low-intensity PA and sedentary periods of time were observed. The results indicate that studies conducted in a population living in high latitudes, may not be significantly affected by seasonality or region when assessing PA.
PubMed ID
24102558 View in PubMed
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Attenuation of the effect of the FTO rs9939609 polymorphism on total and central body fat by physical activity in adolescents: the HELENA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97468
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010 Apr;164(4):328-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Jonatan R Ruiz
Idoia Labayen
Francisco B Ortega
Vanessa Legry
Luis A Moreno
Jean Dallongeville
David Martínez-Gómez
Szilvia Bokor
Yannis Manios
Donatella Ciarapica
Frederic Gottrand
Stefaan De Henauw
Denes Molnár
Michael Sjöström
Aline Meirhaeghe
Author Affiliation
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. ruizj@ugr.es
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010 Apr;164(4):328-33
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - physiology
Adolescent
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - genetics - prevention & control
Polymorphism, Genetic
Proteins - genetics
Waist Circumference
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether physical activity attenuates the effect of the FTO rs9939609 polymorphism on body fat estimates in adolescents. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Athens, Greece; Dortmund, Germany; Ghent, Belgium; Heraklion, Greece; Lille, France; Pécs, Hungary; Rome, Italy; Stockholm, Sweden; Vienna, Austria; and Zaragoza, Spain, from October 2006 to December 2007. PARTICIPANTS: Adolescents from the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence Cross-Sectional Study (n = 752). MAIN EXPOSURE: Physical activity. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The FTO rs9939609 polymorphism was genotyped. Physical activity was assessed by accelerometry. We measured weight, height, waist circumference, and triceps and subscapular skinfolds; body mass index (BMI [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared]) and body fat percentage were calculated. RESULTS: The A allele of the FTO polymorphism was significantly associated with higher BMI (+0.42 per risk allele), higher body fat percentage (+1.03% per risk allele), and higher waist circumference (+0.85 cm per risk allele). We detected significant or borderline gene x physical activity interactions for the studied body fat estimates (for interaction, P = .02, .06, and .10 for BMI, body fat percentage, and waist circumference, respectively). Indeed, the effect of the FTO rs9939609 polymorphism on these body fat parameters was much lower in adolescents who met the daily physical activity recommendations (ie, >/=60 min/d of moderate to vigorous physical activity) compared with those who did not: +0.17 vs +0.65 per risk allele in BMI, respectively; +0.40% vs +1.70% per risk allele in body fat percentage, respectively; and +0.60 vs +1.15 cm per risk allele in waist circumference, respectively. CONCLUSION: Adolescents meeting the daily physical activity recommendations may overcome the effect of the FTO rs9939609 polymorphism on obesity-related traits.
PubMed ID
20368485 View in PubMed
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Bicycling to school is associated with improvements in physical fitness over a 6-year follow-up period in Swedish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123605
Source
Prev Med. 2012 Aug;55(2):108-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Palma Chillón
Francisco B Ortega
Jonatan R Ruiz
Kelly R Evenson
Idoia Labayen
Vicente Martínez-Vizcaino
Anita Hurtig-Wennlöf
Toomas Veidebaum
Michael Sjöström
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Education and Sport, School of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. pchillon@ugr.es
Source
Prev Med. 2012 Aug;55(2):108-12
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bicycling - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cardiac Output - physiology
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Physical Fitness - physiology - psychology
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Questionnaires
Schools
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Transportation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Walking - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To examine whether modes of commuting to school at baseline and changes in commuting were related to 6-year changes in cardiorespiratory fitness in youth.
A total of 262 (142 girls) Swedish children (9 years at entry) were measured at baseline (1998/9) and follow-up (2004/5). Mode of commuting to school was assessed by questionnaire and fitness by a maximal bicycle test.
At baseline, 34% of children used passive modes of commuting (e.g., car, motorcycle, bus, train), 54% walked, and 12% bicycled to school. Six years later the percentage of bicyclists increased 19% and the percentage of walkers decreased 19%. On average, children who bicycled to school increased their fitness 13% (p=0.03) more than those who used passive modes and 20% (p=0.002) more than those who walked. Children who used passive modes or walked at baseline and bicycled to school at 6 years later increased their fitness 14% (p=0.001) more than those who remained using passive modes or walking at follow-up.
Implementing initiatives that encourage bicycling to school may be a useful strategy to increase cardiorespiratory fitness of children.
PubMed ID
22683705 View in PubMed
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Birth weight and subsequent adiposity gain in Swedish children and adolescents: a 6-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133648
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Feb;20(2):376-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Idoia Labayen
Francisco B Ortega
Jonatan R Ruiz
Michael Sjostrom
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of the Basque Country, Vitoria, Spain. idoia.labayen@ehu.es
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Feb;20(2):376-81
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Birth weight
Child
Child Development
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Skinfold thickness
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
We examined whether birth weight (BW) predicts changes in body composition over a 6-year period in Swedish children and adolescents. For this purpose, a total of 247 children (55.5% girls) and 162 adolescents (60.5% girls) were included in the study and were followed up 6 years later. BW was obtained from parental records. We measured weight, height, waist circumference, and the bicep, tricep, subscapular, suprailiac, and medial calf skinfolds, and we calculated BMI, fat-free mass (FFM), and the sum of five skinfolds. Physical activity was assessed by accelerometry. Changes in pubertal status and baseline anthropometric estimates were used as confounders in all analysis. In the children cohort, we observed that BW was inversely associated with changes in BMI (ß = -0.736, P = 0.002) and the sum of five skinfolds (ß = -6.381, P = 0.009) regardless of confounders and physical activity, only in girls. We did not find any significant association between BW and adiposity gain estimates in the adolescent cohort. These findings give further support to the concept that low BW may have a programming effect of subsequent adiposity gain from childhood to adolescence. We also confirm the sex-related differences in the programming effect of body composition.
PubMed ID
21681228 View in PubMed
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Can the IPAQ-long be used to assess occupational physical activity?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128441
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2012 Nov;9(8):1130-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Lydia Kwak
Maria Hagströmer
Michael Sjostrom
Author Affiliation
Dept of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2012 Nov;9(8):1130-7
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Occupational Health
Questionnaires - standards
Sex Distribution
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To be able to draw any conclusions regarding the health effects of occupational physical activity (OPA), more information is needed regarding valid measures to assess OPA. Aims were to compare OPA as assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire long version (IPAQ-L) with OPA assessed with an accelerometer and to assess the contribution of OPA to total PA.
Working adults (n = 441; mean age = 49.4 yrs; 44% males) wore an accelerometer for 7 days in free-living situations and completed the IPAQL. Comparisons were made between IPAQ-L-work and accelerometer data limited to working time (Moderate and Vigorous PA (accelerometer-MVPA-work) and average intensity). Subgroup analyses were performed.
Spearman correlation was r = .46 (P
PubMed ID
22207150 View in PubMed
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Change in paternal grandmothers' early food supply influenced cardiovascular mortality of the female grandchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104943
Source
BMC Genet. 2014;15:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lars Olov Bygren
Petter Tinghög
John Carstensen
Sören Edvinsson
Gunnar Kaati
Marcus E Pembrey
Michael Sjöström
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. lars.olov.bygren@ki.se.
Source
BMC Genet. 2014;15:12
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - genetics - mortality
Diet
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inheritance Patterns
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Status - genetics
Pedigree
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated whether large fluctuations in food availability during grandparents' early development influenced grandchildren's cardiovascular mortality. We reported earlier that changes in availability of food - from good to poor or from poor to good - during intrauterine development was followed by a double risk of sudden death as an adult, and that mortality rate can be associated with ancestors' childhood availability of food. We have now studied transgenerational responses (TGR) to sharp differences of harvest between two consecutive years' for ancestors of 317 people in Överkalix, Sweden.
The confidence intervals were very wide but we found a striking TGR. There was no response in cardiovascular mortality in the grandchild from sharp changes of early exposure, experienced by three of the four grandparents (maternal grandparents and paternal grandfathers). If, however, the paternal grandmother up to puberty lived through a sharp change in food supply from one year to next, her sons' daughters had an excess risk for cardiovascular mortality (HR 2.69, 95% confidence interval 1.05-6.92). Selection or learning and imitation are unlikely explanations. X-linked epigenetic inheritance via spermatozoa seemed to be plausible, with the transmission, limited to being through the father, possibly explained by the sex differences in meiosis.
The shock of change in food availability seems to give specific transgenerational responses.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24552514 View in PubMed
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31 records – page 1 of 4.