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Adverse pregnancy outcome in users of sulfamethizole during pregnancy: a population-based observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58360
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2003 Nov;52(5):837-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Chaveewan Ratanajamit
Mette Vinther Skriver
Mette Nørgaard
Peter Jepsen
Henrik Carl Schønheyder
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus and Aalborg University Hospitals, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2003 Nov;52(5):837-41
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - etiology
Abortion, Spontaneous - etiology
Anti-Infective Agents - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Jaundice, Neonatal
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sulfamethizole - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of adverse birth and neonatal outcome, and miscarriage in women who used sulfamethizole during pregnancy. METHODS: The association between use of sulfamethizole and adverse birth and neonatal outcome was investigated in a case-control and a cohort study in Denmark. We used data from the Prescription Database, the Birth Registry and the Hospital Discharge Registry in North Jutland County to study any association between sulfamethizole use and first recorded miscarriage. The cohort analysis included 3484 women who received a prescription for sulfamethizole from 30 days before conception to date of delivery, and 60175 women who did not use a sulphonamide-containing drug during pregnancy or 30 days before conception. The case-control analysis included 3347 women who had a miscarriage, of whom 90 had taken sulfamethizole, and 22599 primiparous controls who had a live birth. RESULTS: Among women who received prescriptions for sulfamethizole, adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for adverse birth outcome were: malformation 1.17 (0.95-1.43); low birth weight 0.69 (0.49-0.98); pre-term birth 1.12 (0.97-1.30); stillbirth 1.02 (0.61-1.68); neonatal jaundice 1.14 (0.38-3.46); and for receiving a prescription for sulfamethizole within 1 week before miscarriage 1.66 (0.92-2.99). CONCLUSIONS: We found no increased risk of congenital malformation, stillbirth or pre-term birth, and no association between use of sulfamethizole late in pregnancy and risk of neonatal jaundice. There was an increased risk of miscarriage after exposure to sulfamethizole during the week before miscarriage, but further studies are needed to evaluate whether this increased risk is causal.
PubMed ID
14519675 View in PubMed
Less detail

Danish group reanalyses miscarriage in NSAID users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63420
Source
BMJ. 2004 Jan 10;328(7431):109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2004

Ectopic pregnancies and reproductive capacity after Chlamydia trachomatis positive and negative test results: a historical follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63212
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2005 Jun;32(6):377-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Berit Andersen
Lars Østergaard
Erzsebet Puho
Mette Vinther Skriver
Henrik C Schønheyder
Author Affiliation
Research Unit for General Practice, Aarhus, Denmark. ba@alm.au.dk
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2005 Jun;32(6):377-81
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth rate
Chlamydia Infections - complications
Chlamydia trachomatis
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Ectopic - epidemiology - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Recent studies have shown that women with Chlamydia trachomatis-positive test results worry about their future fertility. GOAL: The goal of this study was to give women infected with C. trachomatis a fertility prognosis by analyzing ectopic pregnancies and birth rates STUDY DESIGN: An historical follow-up study in a cohort of 22,264 women tested for the infection was conducted. RESULTS: Cox regression analysis with time-dependent covariates showed that women with at least 1 C. trachomatis-positive test result had a lower incidence rate of ectopic pregnancy than women with negative test results only (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31-0.96). We found comparable birth rates in the 2 groups (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.84-1.00). CONCLUSIONS: Counseling of women with a C. trachomatis-positive test result should emphasize the benefit of detection and treatment of the infection in terms of future morbidity.
PubMed ID
15912085 View in PubMed
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Effect of including fitness testing in preventive health checks on cardiorespiratory fitness and motivation: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265448
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:1057
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Kirsten Høj
Mette Vinther Skriver
Anne-Louise Smidt Hansen
Bo Christensen
Helle Terkildsen Maindal
Annelli Sandbæk
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:1057
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Exercise
Exercise Test
Female
Health
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Physical Examination
Physical Fitness
Preventive Health Services
Research Design
Abstract
Preventive health checks may identify individuals with an unhealthy lifestyle and motivate them to change behaviour. However, knowledge about the impact of the different components included in preventive health checks is deficient. The aim of this trial is to evaluate whether including cardiorespiratory fitness testing in preventive health checks 1) increases cardiorespiratory fitness level and motivation to change physical activity behaviour and 2) reduces physical inactivity prevalence and improves self-rated health compared with preventive health checks without fitness testing.
An open-label, household-cluster, randomized controlled trial with a two-group parallel design is used. The trial is embedded in a population-based health promotion program, "Check your Health Preventive Program", in which all 30-49 year-old citizens in a Danish municipality are offered a preventive health check. In each arm of the trial, 750 citizens will be recruited (1,500 in total). The primary outcome is cardiorespiratory fitness level assessed by submaximal cycle ergometer testing after one year. An intermediate outcome is the percentage of participants increasing motivation for physical activity behaviour change between baseline and two-weeks follow-up assessed using the Transtheoretical Model's stages of change. Secondary outcomes include changes from baseline to one-year follow-up in physical inactivity prevalence measured by a modified version of the questions developed by Saltin and Grimby, and in self-rated health measures using the Short-Form 12, Health Survey, version 2.
This trial will contribute to a critical appraisal of the value of fitness testing as part of preventive health checks. The conduction in real-life community and general practice structures makes the trial findings applicable and transferable to other municipalities providing support to decision-makers in the development of approaches to increase levels of physical activity and improve health.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02224248. Registered 8 August 2014.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25300392 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fever of unknown origin and cancer: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16668
Source
Lancet Oncol. 2005 Nov;6(11):851-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Lene Mellemkjaer
Mette Vinther Skriver
Søren P Johnsen
Bente Nørgård
Jørgen H Olsen
John A Baron
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. hts@dce.au.dk
Source
Lancet Oncol. 2005 Nov;6(11):851-5
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fever of Unknown Origin - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Prognosis
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Markers, Biological
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Fever of unknown origin is associated with cancer, but the tumour types most commonly involved and the prognostic implications of this relation have not been studied. We aimed to assess the risk of cancer and survival after hospital admission for fever of unknown origin in a nationwide Danish follow-up study. METHODS: We linked the Danish national registry of patients and the nationwide cancer registry, and assessed cancer risk for 43,205 patients discharged for the first time from Danish hospitals after admission for fever of unknown origin during 1977-97. We compared cancer frequency with that expected on the basis of cancer incidence in the general population, and survival of patients with cancer who had had fever of unknown origin with that of controls (ie, patients with cancer matched for cancer site, age at time of cancer diagnosis, and year of cancer diagnosis). FINDINGS: Median follow-up was 6.3 years (IQR 2.7-12.3). During the first year of follow-up, 399 cancers were diagnosed in those who had had fever of unknown origin (standardised incidence ratio 2.3 [95% CI 2.1-2.5]). These individuals had an increased risk of developing cancer--in particular haematological malignant disease; sarcoma; and cancers of the liver, brain, kidney, colon, and pancreas. After 1 year of follow-up, individuals had an increased risk of developing haematological malignant disease and cancers of the liver, brain, and kidney. A slightly higher proportion of people diagnosed with cancer within 1 year of hospital discharge after fever of unknown origin had distant metastases compared with controls (101 [34%] of 294 vs 819 [28%] of 2907; prevalence ratio 1.2 [95% CI 1.0-1.4], and had worse survival than did controls (mortality rate ratio 1.4 [95% CI 1.2-1.6]). INTERPRETATION: Hospital admission for fever of unknown origin is a marker of occult cancer and is associated with a poor outlook.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet Oncol. 2005 Nov;6(11):821-216257786
PubMed ID
16257792 View in PubMed
Less detail

High prevalence of poor fitness among Danish adults, especially among those with high cardiovascular mortality risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290747
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2017 06 01; 27(3):569-574
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-01-2017
Author
Kirsten Høj
Mette Vinther Skriver
Helle Terkildsen Maindal
Bo Christensen
Annelli Sandbæk
Author Affiliation
Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2017 06 01; 27(3):569-574
Date
06-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
: Poor cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Yet, our knowledge about the prevalence of poor CRF is limited. We investigated the prevalence of poor CRF among middle-aged Danish adults from a community-based health promotion program, including identification of a subgroup with high cardiovascular mortality risk. This cross-sectional study included 2,253 middle-aged adults, who completed a preventive health check including CRF testing. CRF (ml O 2 /min/kg) was assessed using the Astrand-Ryhming cycle ergometer test. High 10-year cardiovascular mortality risk as defined in the Danish 2016 guidelines was assessed using questionnaires, health examinations, and prescription data from the Danish National Prescription Registry. The prevalence of poor CRF was 51.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 48.7-54.7) among men and 31.3% (95% CI 28.7-34.1) among women. A total of 216 (19.4%) men and 220 (19.3%) women were identified with a high 10-year cardiovascular mortality risk. Among these, 65.0% of men (95% CI 58.2-71.3) and 44.1% of women (95% CI 37.4-50.9) had poor CRF. Half of men and one third of women participating in a community-based health promotion program were identified with poor CRF. Among high-risk individuals, two thirds of men and almost every second woman had a poor CRF. Our results emphasise the need for effective public health strategies and interventions to increase CRF in the general population and among high-risk individuals in particular in order to improve public health and reduce mortality.
PubMed ID
28040735 View in PubMed
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Loss of life expectancy derived from a standardized mortality ratio in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296100
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Nov; 46(7):767-773
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Mette Vinther Skriver
Michael Væth
Henrik Støvring
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Nov; 46(7):767-773
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) is a widely used measure. A recent methodological study provided an accurate approximate relationship between an SMR and difference in lifetime expectancies. This study examines the usefulness of the theoretical relationship, when comparing historic mortality data in four Scandinavian populations.
For Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, data on mortality every fifth year in the period 1950 to 2010 were obtained. Using 1980 as the reference year, SMRs and difference in life expectancy were calculated. The assumptions behind the theoretical relationship were examined graphically. The theoretical relationship predicts a linear association with a slope, [Formula: see text], between log(SMR) and difference in life expectancies, and the theoretical prediction and calculated differences in lifetime expectancies were compared. We examined the linear association both for life expectancy at birth and at age 30. All analyses were done for females, males and the total population.
The approximate relationship provided accurate predictions of actual differences in lifetime expectancies. The accuracy of the predictions was better when age was restricted to above 30, and improved if the changes in mortality rate were close to a proportional change. Slopes of the linear relationship were generally around 9 for females and 10 for males.
The theoretically derived relationship between SMR and difference in life expectancies provides an accurate prediction for comparing populations with approximately proportional differences in mortality, and was relatively robust. The relationship may provide a useful prediction of differences in lifetime expectancies, which can be more readily communicated and understood.
PubMed ID
29384035 View in PubMed
Less detail

NO excess risk of breast cancer among female users of systemic glucocorticoids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17084
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Apr;14(4):1022-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Lene Mellemkjaer
Mette Vinther Skriver
Timothy L Lash
Jørgen H Olsen
John A Baron
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Ole Worms Allé 150, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. hks@dce.au.dk
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Apr;14(4):1022-3
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced
Denmark
Female
Glucocorticoids - adverse effects
Humans
Middle Aged
No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
PubMed ID
15824184 View in PubMed
Less detail

Pivmecillinam and adverse birth and neonatal outcomes: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30064
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2004;36(10):733-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Mette Vinther Skriver
Mette Nørgaard
Lars Pedersen
Henrik Carl Schønheyder
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. mvs@soci.au.dk
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2004;36(10):733-7
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Amdinocillin Pivoxil - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Apgar score
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - drug therapy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Premature Birth
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Abstract
A previous study unexpectedly showed an increased, statistically imprecise, risk of low Apgar score in children of women redeeming prescriptions for pivmecillinam in late pregnancy. To improve statistical precision we extended the previous dataset with data for 5 more y, and in addition added more neonatal outcomes. We thus examined the risk of adverse birth and neonatal outcomes among pregnant users of pivmecillinam based on population-based registries in North Jutland County, Denmark. We included 63,659 women with a live birth, or stillbirth after the 28th week of gestation. 2031 had redeemed prescriptions for pivmecillinam any time during pregnancy, 559 in the first trimester and 371 within 28 d before delivery. Adjusted odds ratios were: birth defects 0.83 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.53-1.32) for exposure during first trimester, preterm delivery 0.96 (95% CI 0.79-1.18) and low birth weight 0.79 (95% CI 0.52-1.20) for exposure any time during pregnancy, and stillbirth 1.19 (95% CI 0.30-4.80), low Apgar score 1.17 (95% CI 0.37-3.66), hypoglycaemia 1.03 (95% CI 0.53-2.00), and respiratory distress syndrome 0.79 (95% CI 0.38-1.68) for exposure within 28 d before delivery. Use of pivmecillinam during pregnancy did not appear to increase the risk of adverse birth and neonatal outcomes; however, statistical precision is still low.
PubMed ID
15513399 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.