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Care interaction adding challenges to old patients' well-being during surgical hospital treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274264
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2015;10:28830
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lisbeth Uhrenfeldt
Mette Terp Høybye
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2015;10:28830
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers
Colorectal Surgery - nursing
Denmark
Empathy
Female
Hospitalization
Hospitals
Humans
Male
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Care - standards
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Patient satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
Today, hospitals offer surgical treatment within a short hospital admission. This brief interaction may challenge the well-being of old patients. The aim of this study was to explore how the well-being of old hospitalized patients was affected by the interaction with staff during a fast-track surgical treatment and hospital admission for colon cancer. We used an ethnographic methodology with field observations and unstructured interviews focusing on one patient at a time (n=9) during a full day; the hours ranging from 7:45 a.m. to 8 p.m. Participants were between 74 and 85 years of age and of both sexes. The study was reported to the Danish Data Protection Agency with reference number (2007-58-0010). The encounter between old patients and the staff was a main theme in our findings elucidating a number of care challenges. The identified care challenges illustrated "well-being as a matter of different perspectives," "vulnerability in contrast to well-being," and "staff mix influencing the care encounter." The experience of well-being in old cancer patients during hospital admission was absent or challenged when staff did not acknowledge their individual vulnerability and needs.
Notes
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Cites: Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:2281024559546
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2013 Aug;69(8):1678-9023509965
Cites: Palliat Med. 2013 May;27(5):447-5622707180
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Mar;27(1):184-9422414199
Cites: Int J Nurs Pract. 2012 Oct;18(5):501-823009380
Cites: Adv Emerg Nurs J. 2012 Jul-Sep;34(3):197-20322842961
PubMed ID
26499314 View in PubMed
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A case of standardization? Implementing health promotion guidelines in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282713
Source
Health Promot Int. 2016 Sep;31(3):692-703
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Morten Hulvej Rod
Mette Terp Høybye
Source
Health Promot Int. 2016 Sep;31(3):692-703
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control
Denmark
Exercise
Health promotion - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mental health
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Reproductive Health - standards
Smoking - prevention & control
Abstract
Guidelines are increasingly used in an effort to standardize and systematize health practices at the local level and to promote evidence-based practice. The implementation of guidelines frequently faces problems, however, and standardization processes may in general have other outcomes than the ones envisioned by the makers of standards. In 2012, the Danish National Health Authorities introduced a set of health promotion guidelines that were meant to guide the decision making and priority setting of Denmark's 98 local governments. The guidelines provided recommendations for health promotion policies and interventions and were structured according to risk factors such as alcohol, smoking and physical activity. This article examines the process of implementation of the new Danish health promotion guidelines. The article is based on qualitative interviews and participant observation, focusing on the professional practices of health promotion officers in four local governments as well as the field of Danish health promotion more generally. The analysis highlights practices and episodes related to the implementation of the guidelines and takes inspiration from Timmermans and Epstein's sociology of standards and standardization. It remains an open question whether or not the guidelines lead to more standardized policies and interventions, but we suggest that the guidelines promote a risk factor-oriented approach as the dominant frame for knowledge, reasoning, decision making and priority setting in health promotion. We describe this process as a case of epistemic standardization.
PubMed ID
25912256 View in PubMed
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Early parental death and risk of hospitalization for affective disorder in adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113863
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Jul;24(4):608-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Charlotte Weiling Appel
Christoffer Johansen
Isabelle Deltour
Kirsten Frederiksen
Henrik Hjalgrim
Susanne Oksbjerg Dalton
Annemarie Dencker
Jes Dige
Per Bøge
Bo Andreassen Rix
Atle Dyregrov
Preben Engelbrekt
Eva Helweg
Ole Abildgaard Mikkelsen
Mette Terp Høybye
Pernille Envold Bidstrup
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. appel@cancer.dk
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Jul;24(4):608-15
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Disorders, Psychotic - epidemiology - therapy
Age Factors
Bereavement
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Parental Death - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Risk assessment
Stress, Psychological
Suicide - psychology
Abstract
Early parental death is one of the most stressful childhood life events and may influence subsequent psychological health. We investigated the association between early parental loss and risk of hospitalization for an affective disorder in adulthood.
Our nationwide register-based cohort study comprises 1,225,660 people born in Denmark in 1970-1990, of whom 138,893 experienced the death of a parent before the age of 30 years. Follow-up for hospitalization for an affective disorder in the period 1990-2009 yielded 15,261,058 person-years and 19,867 hospitalizations for affective disorder (bereaved n = 2,644; nonbereaved n = 17,223). A Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess hazard ratios (HRs) for hospitalization with an affective disorder according to early parental death.
People who experienced early parental death had an increased risk of hospitalization for a unipolar disorder (men: HR= 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23-1.44; women: 1.23; 1.17-1.30). Stronger associations were observed for parental death caused by suicide than for other causes. For bipolar affective disorder, an increased risk of hospitalization was observed only after suicide.
People who had lost a parent had an increased risk of hospitalization for unipolar affective disorder. Although this was particularly true for bereavement due to parental suicide, it was also found for parental death from other causes. In contrast, an increased risk of hospitalization for bipolar affective disorder was observed only after parental suicide.
Notes
Comment In: Epidemiology. 2013 Jul;24(4):616-823732737
PubMed ID
23676260 View in PubMed
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Encounters in cancer treatment: intersubjective configurations of a need for rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260993
Source
Med Anthropol Q. 2014 Sep;28(3):305-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Mette Terp Høybye
Tine Tjørnhøj-Thomsen
Source
Med Anthropol Q. 2014 Sep;28(3):305-22
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication
Denmark - ethnology
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - ethnology - psychology - rehabilitation
Patients - psychology
Physician-Patient Relations
Abstract
Based on extensive ethnographic material from in-depth interviews with Danish cancer patients after treatment, this study analyzes their stories to explore how interactions with the physician configures and situates a need for rehabilitation. We identify three themes in the illness stories: (1) attentiveness and care; (2) fragmentation and objectification; and (3) mistrust and dehumanization. These are all closely tied to the concept of recognition, showing how the themes are configured by the social interaction between the patient and the physician and how the need for rehabilitation is shaped by this encounter. The significance of the social encounters in cancer treatment is elucidated through this analysis, and we demonstrate how the need for recognition of the complex effects of cancer on one's life is central to counter experiences of objectification and dehumanization.
PubMed ID
24395584 View in PubMed
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Healing environments in cancer treatment and care. Relations of space and practice in hematological cancer treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118586
Source
Acta Oncol. 2013 Feb;52(2):440-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Mette Terp Høybye
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. mtho@si-folkesundhed.dk
Source
Acta Oncol. 2013 Feb;52(2):440-6
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hematologic Neoplasms - therapy
Hospital Design and Construction
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Space
Professional Practice
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Young Adult
Abstract
Given the growing attention to the importance of design in shaping healing hospital environments this study extends the understanding of healing environments, beyond causal links between environmental exposure and health outcome by elucidating how environments and practices interrelate.
The study was conducted as an ethnographic fieldwork from March 2011 to September 2011 at the Department of Haematology at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, systematically using participant observation and interviews as research strategies. It included 20 patients, four of who were followed closely over an extended time period.
Through thematic analysis five key concepts emerged about the social dynamics of hospital environments: practices of self; creating personal space; social recognition; negotiating space; and ambiguity of space and care. Through these concepts, the study demonstrates how the hospital environment is a flow of relations between space and practice that changes and challenges a structural idea of design and healing. Patients' sense of healing changes with the experience of progression in treatment and the capacity of the hospital space to incite an experience of homeliness and care. Furthermore, cancer patients continuously challenge the use and limits of space by individual objects and practices of privacy and home.
Healing environments are complex relations between practices, space and care, where recognition of the individual patient's needs, values and experiences is key to developing the environment to support the patient quality of life. The present study holds implications for practice to inform design of future hospital environments for cancer treatment. The study points to the importance for being attentive to the need for flexible spaces in hospitals that recognize the dynamics of healing, by providing individualized care, relating to the particular and changing needs of patients supporting their potential and their challenged condition with the best care possible.
PubMed ID
23190358 View in PubMed
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Impact of symptom burden on health related quality of life of cancer survivors in a Danish cancer rehabilitation program: A longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139171
Source
Acta Oncol. 2011 Feb;50(2):223-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Trille Kristina Kjaer
Christoffer Johansen
Else Ibfelt
Jane Christensen
Nina Rottmann
Mette Terp Høybye
Lone Ross
Maria Svendsen
Susanne Oksbjerg Dalton
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Cancer Research, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark. trille@cancer.dk
Source
Acta Oncol. 2011 Feb;50(2):223-32
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cost of Illness
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Survivors - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Little research has been conducted on the effect of self-reported rating of symptom severity on quality of life (QoL) among cancer survivors. The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence of symptoms and whether information about self-reported symptom severity adds value to QoL measurements.
A questionnaire including the EORTC QLQ-C30 and an empirically derived symptom check-list was completed by 2 486 cancer survivors participating in a rehabilitation program at baseline and at 1, 6 and 12 months' follow-up. We used multivariate linear regression models to evaluate the association between QoL and the dichotomous variables for perceived symptom severity (high vs. low) and cancer stage (high vs. low), with adjustment for age, gender, education and time since diagnosis.
Of the 2 379 participants who reported having one or more symptoms, 1 479 (62%) considered the reported symptom to be severe. This subgroup had significantly poorer QoL at baseline for all sites, ranging from -15.9 to -10.2, compared to those who did not regard their symptom as severe. Significantly lower baseline levels on all functional subscales were seen for all sites in association with high perceived symptom severity (range from -9.9 to -3.0 (physical functioning), from -21.1 to -13.0 (social functioning), from -18.8 to -8.5 (emotional functioning), and from -18.4 to -9.6 (cognitive functioning). The impairment of physical, social, emotional, and cognitive functioning persisted through 12 months for participants with cancer of the breast, lung and those with lymphomas, although not all reached significance.
Cancer survivors, irrespective of cancer site, experience a high burden of symptoms. Thorough monitoring and assessment of symptoms and careful scrutiny of cancer survivors' perceptions of how symptoms affect their lives is critical for clinical identification of patients who might benefit from enhanced medical attention and may be an important supplement to QoL measures.
PubMed ID
21091085 View in PubMed
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Lived experiences and challenges of older surgical patients during hospitalization for cancer: an ethnographic fieldwork.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256809
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:22810
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lisbeth Uhrenfeldt
Mette Terp Høybye
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; Department of Research, Horsens Hospital, Horsens, Denmark; lis.uhr@rm.dk.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:22810
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - physiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropology, Cultural - methods - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Male
Neoplasms - surgery
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Polypharmacy
Abstract
This paper explores the lived experiences of older surgical patients' (aged 74 years and older) experienced challenges during a brief admission to hospital. Age, gender, polypharmacy, and the severity of illness are also factors known to affect the hospitalization process. For an ethnographic study using participant observation and interviews, surgical cancer patients (n = 9, aged 74 years and older) were recruited during admission to a Danish teaching hospital. Using ethnographic strategies of participant observation and interviews, each patient was followed through the course of 1 day during their stay at the hospital. Interviews were carried out with all patients during this time. Three areas of concern were identified as prominent in the patients' experiences and challenges during their short hospital stay: teeth and oral cavity, eating in a hospital setting, and medication during hospitalization. Short-term hospitalization requires focused collaboration between staff and patient concerning individual challenges from their teeth and oral cavity as support of nutritional needs during surgical treatment for cancer.
Notes
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Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2013 Aug;69(8):1678-9023509965
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2013 Aug;22(15-16):2327-3722672526
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Mar;27(1):184-9422414199
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Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2012 Oct;68(10):2280-822221207
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2012 Aug;62(601):e530-722867676
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2011 Oct;67(10):2284-9121466582
PubMed ID
24559546 View in PubMed
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Online interaction. Effects of storytelling in an internet breast cancer support group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178253
Source
Psychooncology. 2005 Mar;14(3):211-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Mette Terp Høybye
Christoffer Johansen
Tine Tjørnhøj-Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Cancer Research, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. metteh@cancer.dk
Source
Psychooncology. 2005 Mar;14(3):211-20
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - complications - ethnology - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Communication
Female
Humans
Internet - instrumentation
Interpersonal Relations
Middle Aged
Motivation
Narration
Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Social Isolation
Social Support
Abstract
The internet provides new ways of forming social relationships among people with breast cancer and is increasingly used for this purpose. This qualitative study, using ethnographic case-study method, aimed to explore how support groups on the internet can break the social isolation that follows cancer and chronic pain, by analysing the storytelling emerging on the Scandinavian Breast Cancer Mailing list. Using participant observation and face-to-face or online interviews of participants, we investigated the motivations of 15 women who chose the internet to counteract social isolation after breast cancer. The results showed that the women were empowered by the exchanges of knowledge and experience within the support group. The internet was considered a means for finding ways of living with breast cancer. Our study suggests that internet support groups have important potential for the rehabilitation of cancer patients.
PubMed ID
15386774 View in PubMed
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A palliative environment: Caring for seriously ill hospitalized patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269481
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2015 Apr;13(2):201-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Connie Timmermann
Lisbeth Uhrenfeldt
Mette Terp Høybye
Regner Birkelund
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2015 Apr;13(2):201-9
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Emotions
Female
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Qualitative Research
Abstract
To explore how patients experience being in the hospital environment and the meaning they assign to the environment during serious illness.
A qualitative study design was applied, and the data analysis was inspired by Ricoeur's phenomenological-hermeneutic theory of interpretation. Data were collected through multiple qualitative interviews combined with observations at a teaching hospital in Denmark from May to September 2011. A total of 12 patients participated.
The findings showed that the hospital environment has a strong impact on patients' emotions and well-being. They reported that aesthetic decorations and small cozy spots for conversation or relaxation created a sense of homeliness that reinforced a positive mood and personal strength. Furthermore, being surrounded by some of their personal items or undertaking familiar tasks, patients were able to maintain a better sense of self. Maintaining at least some kind of familiar daily rhythm was important for their sense of well-being and positive emotions.
The results stress the importance of an aesthetically pleasing and homelike hospital environment as part of palliative care, since the aesthetic practice and a sense of homeliness strengthened patients' experiences of well-being, relief, and positive emotions while in a vulnerable situation. Such knowledge could encourage the development of new policies regarding appropriate care settings, which in turn could result in overall improved care during serious illness.
PubMed ID
24524598 View in PubMed
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Social and psychological determinants of participation in internet-based cancer support groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98973
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2010 May;18(5):553-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Mette Terp Høybye
Susanne Oksbjerg Dalton
Jane Christensen
Lone Ross
Katrin Gaardbo Kuhn
Christoffer Johansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Cancer Research, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. metteh@cancer.dk
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2010 May;18(5):553-60
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Female
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Neoplasms - psychology - rehabilitation
Questionnaires
Self-Help Groups - utilization
Social Class
Abstract
PURPOSE: In this study, we identified the social and psychological characteristics of Danish cancer patients that determine use of the internet for support. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We invited 230 cancer patients taking part in a public rehabilitation program to participate in an internet module comprising training in the retrieval of cancer-related information from the internet and self-support groups. Persons who were motivated to join the internet groups (N = 100; 47%) were compared with persons who chose not to participate (N = 111) on the basis of self-reported baseline questionnaire data. Nineteen persons either did not return the questionnaire or had missing values in confounding variables. RESULTS: Cancer patients who were motivated to participate in internet support groups belong to higher socioeconomic groups (based on household income and employment) compared to non-participants. We observed no difference between the two groups in quality of life or psychological well-being, while coping to some extent seemed related to participation in internet support groups. CONCLUSION: This study adds to the discussion on social inequality in internet use by cancer patients, showing that patients who are not inclined to use internet-based interventions are characterized by social position and employ more passive coping strategies.
PubMed ID
19579037 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.