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Ambient air pollution and primary liver cancer incidence in four European cohorts within the ESCAPE project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282438
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Apr;154:226-233
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Marie Pedersen
Zorana J Andersen
Massimo Stafoggia
Gudrun Weinmayr
Claudia Galassi
Mette Sørensen
Kirsten T Eriksen
Anne Tjønneland
Steffen Loft
Andrea Jaensch
Gabriele Nagel
Hans Concin
Ming-Yi Tsai
Sara Grioni
Alessandro Marcon
Vittorio Krogh
Fulvio Ricceri
Carlotta Sacerdote
Andrea Ranzi
Ranjeet Sokhi
Roel Vermeulen
Kees de Hoogh
Meng Wang
Rob Beelen
Paolo Vineis
Bert Brunekreef
Gerard Hoek
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Apr;154:226-233
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Austria - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Italy - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Nitrogen Oxides - adverse effects - analysis
Particulate Matter - adverse effects - analysis
Vehicle Emissions - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Tobacco smoke exposure increases the risk of cancer in the liver, but little is known about the possible risk associated with exposure to ambient air pollution.
We evaluated the association between residential exposure to air pollution and primary liver cancer incidence.
We obtained data from four cohorts with enrolment during 1985-2005 in Denmark, Austria and Italy. Exposure to nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOX), particulate matter (PM) with diameter of less than 10µm (PM10), less than 2.5µm (PM2.5), between 2.5 and 10µm (PM2.5-10) and PM2.5 absorbance (soot) at baseline home addresses were estimated using land-use regression models from the ESCAPE project. We also investigated traffic density on the nearest road. We used Cox proportional-hazards models with adjustment for potential confounders for cohort-specific analyses and random-effects meta-analyses to estimate summary hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Out of 174,770 included participants, 279 liver cancer cases were diagnosed during a mean follow-up of 17 years. In each cohort, HRs above one were observed for all exposures with exception of PM2.5 absorbance and traffic density. In the meta-analysis, all exposures were associated with elevated HRs, but none of the associations reached statistical significance. The summary HR associated with a 10-µg/m(3) increase in NO2 was 1.10 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 1.30) and 1.34 (95% CI: 0.76, 2.35) for a 5-µg/m(3) increase in PM2.5.
The results provide suggestive evidence that ambient air pollution may increase the risk of liver cancer. Confidence intervals for associations with NO2 and NOX were narrower than for the other exposures.
PubMed ID
28107740 View in PubMed
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The association of LUR modeled PM2.5 elemental composition with personal exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263444
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Sep 15;493:298-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2014
Author
Denise Montagne
Gerard Hoek
Mark Nieuwenhuijsen
Timo Lanki
Arto Pennanen
Meritxell Portella
Kees Meliefste
Meng Wang
Marloes Eeftens
Tarja Yli-Tuomi
Marta Cirach
Bert Brunekreef
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Sep 15;493:298-306
Date
Sep-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Cities
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Finland
Humans
Models, Chemical
Netherlands
Particulate Matter - analysis
Abstract
Land use regression (LUR) models predict spatial variation of ambient concentrations, but little is known about the validity in predicting personal exposures. In this study, the association of LUR modeled concentrations of PM2.5 components with measured personal concentrations was determined. The elements of interest were copper (Cu), iron (Fe), potassium (K), nickel (Ni), sulfur (S), silicon (Si), vanadium (V) and zinc (Zn).
In Helsinki (Finland), Utrecht (the Netherlands) and Barcelona (Spain) five participants from urban background, five from suburban background and five from busy street sites were selected in each city (15 participants per city). Outdoor, indoor and personal 96-hour PM2.5 samples were collected by the participants over periods of two weeks in three different seasons (winter, summer and spring/autumn) and the overall average was calculated. Elemental composition was measured by ED-XRF spectrometry. The LUR models for the average ambient concentrations of each element were developed by the ESCAPE project.
LUR models predicted the within-city variation of average outdoor Cu and Fe concentrations moderately well (range in R(2) 27-67% for Cu and 24-54% for Fe). The outdoor concentrations of the other elements were not well predicted. The LUR modeled concentration only significantly correlated with measured personal Fe exposure in Utrecht and Ni and V in Helsinki. The LUR model predictions did not correlate with measured personal Cu exposure. After excluding observations with an indoor/outdoor ratio of >1.5, modeled Cu outdoor concentrations correlated with indoor concentrations in Helsinki and Utrecht and personal concentrations in Utrecht. The LUR model predictions were associated with measured outdoor, indoor and personal concentrations for all elements when the data for the three cities was pooled.
Within-city modeled variation of elemental composition of PM2.5 did not predict measured variation in personal exposure well.
PubMed ID
24950499 View in PubMed
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Correction to: Structure and function of the Arctic and Antarctic marine microbiota as revealed by metagenomics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305730
Source
Microbiome. 2020 Jun 01; 8(1):77
Publication Type
Published Erratum
Date
Jun-01-2020
Author
Shunan Cao
Weipeng Zhang
Wei Ding
Meng Wang
Shen Fan
Bo Yang
Andrew Mcminn
Min Wang
Bin-Bin Xie
Qi-Long Qin
Xiu-Lan Chen
Jianfeng He
Yu-Zhong Zhang
Author Affiliation
The Key Laboratory for Polar Science MNR, Polar Research Institute of China, Shanghai, 200136, China.
Source
Microbiome. 2020 Jun 01; 8(1):77
Date
Jun-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Published Erratum
Abstract
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via the original article.
Notes
ErratumFor: Microbiome. 2020 Apr 2;8(1):47 PMID 32241287
PubMed ID
32482168 View in PubMed
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Genome Sequencing of Mesonia algae K4-1 Reveals Its Adaptation to the Arctic Ocean.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307560
Source
Front Microbiol. 2019; 10:2812
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2019
Author
Ran Huan
JiaFeng Huang
Dan Liu
Meng Wang
CongLing Liu
YunQian Zhang
CuiPing Yi
Dong Xiao
HaiLun He
Author Affiliation
School of Life Sciences, Central South University, Changsha, China.
Source
Front Microbiol. 2019; 10:2812
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The special ecological environment of the Arctic has brought about a large number of salt-tolerant and psychrotolerant microorganisms. We isolated two culturable bacterial strains of the genus Mesonia; one from the Arctic ocean, Mesonia algae K4-1, and one from the tropical sea, Mesonia sp. HuA40. Our genome analysis and phenotypic experiments indicated that Mesonia algae K4-1 is a moderately halophilic and psychrophilic bacterium. Mesonia algae K4-1 can tolerate 3-14% NaCl and grow at a wide range of temperatures from 4 to 50°C. Mesonia sp. HuA40 is a mesophilic bacterium that can only grow with 3-9% NaCl. In addition, the salt adaptation strategy of Mesonia algae K4-1 accumulates organic osmolytes in the cell. RNA helicases, glutathione and organic compatible solutes may play important roles in maintaining the metabolism and physiological function of Mesonia algae K4-1 under cold stress. Moreover, the ability of Mesonia algae K4-1 to adapt to an oligotrophic marine environment is likely due to the synthesis of a large number of extracellular polysaccharides and the secretion of various families of extracellular proteases. This study systematically analyzed the relationship between genomic differentiation and environmental factors of the Mesonia genus and revealed the possible adaptation mechanism of Mesonia algae K4-1 in the extreme Arctic marine environment at the genomic level.
PubMed ID
31866978 View in PubMed
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Long-term Exposure to Particulate Matter Constituents and the Incidence of Coronary Events in 11 European Cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270480
Source
Epidemiology. 2015 Jul;26(4):565-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Kathrin Wolf
Massimo Stafoggia
Giulia Cesaroni
Zorana Jovanovic Andersen
Rob Beelen
Claudia Galassi
Frauke Hennig
Enrica Migliore
Johanna Penell
Fulvio Ricceri
Mette Sørensen
Anu W Turunen
Regina Hampel
Barbara Hoffmann
Hagen Kälsch
Tiina Laatikainen
Göran Pershagen
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Carlotta Sacerdote
Paolo Vineis
Chiara Badaloni
Josef Cyrys
Kees de Hoogh
Kirsten T Eriksen
Aleksandra Jedynska
Menno Keuken
Ingeborg Kooter
Timo Lanki
Andrea Ranzi
Dorothea Sugiri
Ming-Yi Tsai
Meng Wang
Gerard Hoek
Bert Brunekreef
Annette Peters
Francesco Forastiere
Source
Epidemiology. 2015 Jul;26(4):565-74
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Copper - analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Iron - analysis
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - mortality
Nickel - analysis
Particulate Matter - chemistry
Potassium - analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Silicon - analysis
Sulfur - analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Vanadium - analysis
Zinc - analysis
Abstract
Long-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality but little is known about the role of the chemical composition of PM. This study examined the association of residential long-term exposure to PM components with incident coronary events.
Eleven cohorts from Finland, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, and Italy participated in this analysis. 5,157 incident coronary events were identified within 100,166 persons followed on average for 11.5 years. Long-term residential concentrations of PM
PubMed ID
25978793 View in PubMed
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