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Above and beyond: A qualitative study of the work of nurses and care assistants in long term care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306747
Source
Work. 2020; 65(3):509-516
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2020
Author
Emily Gard Marshall
Melissa Power
Nancy Edgecombe
Melissa K Andrew
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Primary Care Research Unit, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
Work. 2020; 65(3):509-516
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Family
Focus Groups
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Long-Term Care
Nova Scotia
Nursing Assistants
Nursing Homes
Nursing Staff - psychology
Qualitative Research
Terminal Care
Work Engagement
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
As the Canadian population ages, there is a need to improve long-term care (LTC) services. An increased understanding of the positive work experiences of LTC staff may help attract more human health resources to LTC.
To describe the perceptions of the roles and work of nurses and care assistants in LTC from interprofessional perspectives.
This study used qualitative data collected from a larger mixed-methods study, Care by Design. The qualitative phase explored the lived experience of LTC staff from the perspectives of key stakeholders via focus groups and individual interviews.
One central theme that emerged from the study was that of LTC staff going "above and beyond" their clinical duties to care for residents. This above and beyond theme was categorized into subthemes including: 1. familial bonds between residents and staff; 2. staff spending additional time with residents; 3. the ability to provide comfort to family members; and 4. staff dedication during end-of-life care.
The findings show that staff develop a kinship with residents, demonstrate respect towards residents' families and provide comfort at the end-of-life. In emphasizing these themes of positive and fulfilling work, the present study provides insight into why staff work in LTC.
PubMed ID
32116270 View in PubMed
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The Role of Nurse Practitioners in Long-Term Care Settings in Newfoundland and Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296031
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2017; 30(4):26-38
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Maria Mathews
Dana Ryan
Melissa Power
Author Affiliation
Professor of Health Policy/Health Care Delivery, Department of Community Health and Humanities, Memorial University, St. John's, NL.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2017; 30(4):26-38
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Long-Term Care
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nurse practitioners
Nurse's Role
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Residential Facilities - organization & administration
Abstract
Using a cross-sectional survey of managers, we examined the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) in long-term care (LTC) facilities in Newfoundland and Labrador. We compared facilities with no regular primary care provider, with only family physicians (FPs) and with both FPs and NPs. A total of 91 of 127 (71.0%) facilities completed the survey; 19 (21.3%) facilities had no primary care provider, 42 (47.2%) had FPs only and 28 (31.5%) had both FPs and NPs. NPs and FPs provide a similar range of services in LTC. On a five-point Likert scale, facilities with no primary care provider were more likely to rate continuity of care lower (2.59; p
PubMed ID
29676988 View in PubMed
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