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Acute coronary syndrome in octogenarians: association between percutaneous coronary intervention and long-term mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273526
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2015;10:1547-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Salim Bary Barywani
Shijun Li
Maria Lindh
Josefin Ekelund
Max Petzold
Per Albertsson
Lars H Lund
Michael Lx Fu
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2015;10:1547-53
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - mortality - therapy
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Propensity Score
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Evidence of improved survival after use of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in elderly patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is limited. We assessed the association between PCI and long-term mortality in octogenarians with ACS.
We followed 353 consecutive patients aged =80 years hospitalized with ACS during 2006-2007. Among them, 182 were treated with PCI, whereas 171 were not. PCI-treated patients were younger and more often male, and had less stroke and dependency in activities of daily living, but there were no significant differences in occurrence of diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, and uncured malignancies between the two groups. The association between PCI and all-cause mortality was assessed in the overall cohort and a 1:1 matched cohort based on propensity score (PS). In overall cohort, 5-year all-cause mortality was 46.2% and 89.5% in the PCI and non-PCI groups, respectively. Cox regression analysis in overall cohort by adjustment for ten baseline variables showed statistically significant association between PCI and reduced long-term mortality (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
26451095 View in PubMed
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Adherence to Antihypertensive Therapy and Elevated Blood Pressure: Should We Consider the Use of Multiple Medications?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273360
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0137451
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Khedidja Hedna
Katja M Hakkarainen
Hanna Gyllensten
Anna K Jönsson
Karolina Andersson Sundell
Max Petzold
Staffan Hägg
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0137451
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Medication Adherence
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Failure
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Although a majority of patients with hypertension require a multidrug therapy, this is rarely considered when measuring adherence from refill data. Moreover, investigating the association between refill non-adherence to antihypertensive therapy (AHT) and elevated blood pressure (BP) has been advocated.
Identify factors associated with non-adherence to AHT, considering the multidrug therapy, and investigate the association between non-adherence to AHT and elevated BP.
A retrospective cohort study including patients with hypertension, identified from a random sample of 5025 Swedish adults. Two measures of adherence were estimated by the proportion of days covered method (PDC=80%): (1) Adherence to any antihypertensive medication and, (2) adherence to the full AHT regimen. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to investigate the association between sociodemographic factors (age, sex, education, income), clinical factors (user profile, number of antihypertensive medications, healthcare use, cardiovascular comorbidities) and non-adherence. Moreover, the association between non-adherence (long-term and a month prior to BP measurement) and elevated BP was investigated.
Non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication was higher among persons
Notes
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PubMed ID
26359861 View in PubMed
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Adverse health effects of experiencing food insecurity among Greenlandic school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107728
Source
Pages 774-780 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):774-780
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Birgit Niclasen
Max Petzold
Christina W Schnohr
Author Affiliation
Greenlandic Branch, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 774-780 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):774-780
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Greenland - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Hunger
Male
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
In vulnerable populations, food security in children has been found to be associated with negative health effects. Still, little is known about whether the negative health effects can be retrieved in children at the population level.
To examine food insecurity reported by Greenlandic school children as a predictor for perceived health, physical symptoms and medicine use.
The study is based on the Greenlandic part of the Health Behavior in School-aged Children survey. The 2010 survey included 2,254 students corresponding to 40% of all Greenlandic school children in Grade 5 through 10. The participation rate in the participating schools was 65%. Food insecurity was measured as going to bed or to school hungry because there was no food at home.
Boys, the youngest children (11-12 year-olds), and children from low affluence homes were at increased risk for food insecurity. Poor or fair self-rated health, medicine use last month and physical symptoms during the last 6 months were all more frequent in children reporting food insecurity. Controlling for age, gender and family affluence odds ratio (OR) for self-rated health was 1.60 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.23-2.06) (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984271 View in PubMed
Documents
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Alcohol environment, gender and nonfatal injuries in young people. An ecological study of fourteen Swedish municipalities (2000-2005).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121425
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2012;7:36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Richard A Dale
Marie Hasselberg
Max Petzold
Gunnel Hensing
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, PO Box 453, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden. allan.dale@socmed.gu.se
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2012;7:36
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Child
Cities - legislation & jurisprudence
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Sex Distribution
Statistics as Topic
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Sweden has had a restrictive alcohol policy, but there are gender and geographical differences in alcohol consumption and injury rates within the country. Whether and how the Swedish alcohol environment influences gender differences in injuries in young people is still unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to analyse the associations between the local alcohol environment and age- and gender-specific nonfatal injury rates in people up to 24 years in Sweden.
The local alcohol environment from 14 municipalities was studied using indicators of alcohol access, alcohol consumption and alcohol-related crimes. A comprehensive health care register of nonfatal injuries was used to estimate mean annual rates of nonfatal injuries by gender and age group (2000-2005). Pearson's correlation coefficients were used to analyse linear associations.
Associations were shown for both alcohol access and alcohol consumption with injury rates in boys aged 13-17 years; no other associations were observed between alcohol access or per capita alcohol consumption and nonfatal childhood injuries. The prevalence of crimes against alcohol laws was associated with injury rates in children of both genders aged 6-17?years.
This study found no strong area-level associations between alcohol and age and gender specific nonfatal injuries in young people. Further, the strength of the area-level associations varied by age, gender and type of indicator used to study the local alcohol environment.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22908846 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant utilization patterns and mortality in Swedish men and women aged 20-34 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100094
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2010 Nov 10;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2010
Author
Karolina Andersson Sundell
Mika Gissler
Max Petzold
Margda Waern
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, PO Box 12133, 402 42, Gothenburg, Sweden, karolina.a.sundell@nhv.se.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2010 Nov 10;
Date
Nov-10-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare antidepressant utilization patterns and mortality in relation to antidepressant use in men and women aged 20-34 years. METHODS: We used data from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register to identify adults aged 20-34 years who purchased at least one antidepressant in 2006. Information on death and migration was obtained from the Total Population Register by record linkage. One-year prevalence and proportion of new users, amount of purchased antidepressants, concurrent use of other antidepressants, mood stabilizers and antipsychotics and mortality were assessed. RESULTS: The one-year prevalence of antidepressant use was 5.6% among all Swedes aged 20-34 years (n?=?94,239) and was higher among women than men (7.2 vs. 4.0%, p?
PubMed ID
21063694 View in PubMed
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The association between high recreational physical activity and physical activity as a part of daily living in adolescents and availability of local indoor sports facilities and sports clubs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120075
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Nov;40(7):614-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Birgit Niclasen
Max Petzold
Christina W Schnohr
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden. niclasen@greennet.gl
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Nov;40(7):614-20
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Greenland
Humans
Life Style
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Public Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Recreation
Sports
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine how vigorous physical activity (recreational physical activity) (VPA) and moderate to vigorous physical activity as a part of daily life (MVPA) is associated with structural characteristics (availability of sports facilities and sports clubs with child members) in Greenlandic adolescents.
Data from the 2006 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey including 2,430 children aged 11-17 years was used. Logistic regression models were developed with dichotomous measures on VPA and MVPA as outcomes, number of indoor sports facilities and of sports clubs with child members as independent variables, and adjusted for age, gender, family affluence (FAS), and type of habitation (capital, town or village).
High VPA increased with access to indoor facilities, while high MVPA was less likely (odds ratio (OR) 0.54 (0.42-0.70)) if indoor sports facilities were present, both unadjusted and adjusted. Access to a local sports club increased OR for high VPA both unadjusted and adjusted to about 2.3 for five or more clubs, while access to sports clubs was not associated with unadjusted MVPA, negatively associated if adjusted for age, gender and FAS but positively associated if also adjusted for indoor sports facilities.
Access to indoor sports facilities itself had a positive association with high VPA, but was persistently negatively associated with high MVPA. Presence of sports clubs with child members was positively associated with high VPA while the association with high MVPA was more complex. The findings have implications for public health planning.
PubMed ID
23042458 View in PubMed
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Both low and high serum IGF-1 levels associate with increased risk of cardiovascular events in elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259847
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Nov;99(11):E2308-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Daniel Carlzon
Johan Svensson
Max Petzold
Magnus K Karlsson
Östen Ljunggren
Åsa Tivesten
Dan Mellström
Claes Ohlsson
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Nov;99(11):E2308-16
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Male
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
Most previous prospective studies suggest that low serum IGF-1 associates with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events whereas other studies suggest that high serum IGF-1 associates with increased risk of CVD events.
We tested the hypothesis that not only low, but also high serum IGF-1 levels associate with increased risk of CVD events in elderly men.
Serum IGF-1 levels were measured in 2901 elderly men (age 69-81 years) included in the Swedish cohort of the prospective, population-based Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (MrOS), Sweden cohort. Data for CVD events were obtained from national Swedish registers with no loss of followup.
During followup (median, 5.1 y) 589 participants experienced a CVD event. The association between serum IGF-1 and risk of CVD events was nonlinear, and restricted cubic spline Cox regression analysis revealed a U-shaped association between serum IGF-1 levels and CVD events (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
25057875 View in PubMed
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Both low and high serum IGF-I levels associate with cancer mortality in older men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120333
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Dec;97(12):4623-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Johan Svensson
Daniel Carlzon
Max Petzold
Magnus K Karlsson
Östen Ljunggren
Asa Tivesten
Dan Mellström
Claes Ohlsson
Author Affiliation
Center for Bone and Arthritis Research, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, SE-413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden. johan.svensson@medic.gu.se.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Dec;97(12):4623-30
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis - metabolism
Male
Neoplasms - blood - metabolism - mortality
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Although recent population-based studies suggest a U-shaped relationship between serum IGF-I concentration and all-cause mortality, the distribution of death causes underlying this association remains unclear. We hypothesized that high IGF-I levels associate with increased cancer mortality, whereas low IGF-I levels associate with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality.
Serum IGF-I levels were measured in 2901 elderly men (mean age 75.4, range 69-81 yr) included in the prospective population-based Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (Sweden) study. Mortality data were obtained from central registers with no loss of follow-up. The statistical analyses included Cox proportional hazards regressions with or without a spline approach.
During the follow-up (mean 6.0 yr), 586 of the participants died (cancer deaths, n = 211; CVD deaths, n = 214). As expected, our data revealed a U-shaped association between serum IGF-I levels and all-cause mortality. Low as well as high serum IGF-I (quintile 1 or 5 vs. quintiles 2-4) associated with increased cancer mortality [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.86, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.34-2.58; and HR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.37-2.65, respectively]. Only low serum IGF-I associated with increased CVD mortality (quintile 1 vs. quintiles 2-4, HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.08-2.04). These associations remained after adjustment for multiple covariates and exclusion of men who died during the first 2 yr of follow-up.
Our findings demonstrate that both low and high serum IGF-I levels are risk markers for increased cancer mortality in older men. Moreover, low IGF-I levels associate with increased CVD mortality.
PubMed ID
23015658 View in PubMed
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Comparison between mixed and laminar airflow systems in operating rooms and the influence of human factors: experiences from a Swedish orthopedic center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260112
Source
Am J Infect Control. 2014 Jun;42(6):665-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Annette Erichsen Andersson
Max Petzold
Ingrid Bergh
Jón Karlsson
Bengt I Eriksson
Kerstin Nilsson
Source
Am J Infect Control. 2014 Jun;42(6):665-9
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Air Movements
Air Pollution, Indoor - prevention & control
Arthroplasty
Colony Count, Microbial
Environmental monitoring
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Operating Rooms
Orthopedics
Surgical Wound Infection - prevention & control
Sweden
Ventilation - methods
Abstract
The importance of laminar airflow systems in operating rooms as protection from surgical site infections has been questioned. The aim of our study was to explore the differences in air contamination rates between displacement ventilation and laminar airflow systems during planned and acute orthopedic implant surgery. A second aim was to compare the influence of the number of people present, the reasons for traffic flow, and the door-opening rates between the 2 systems.
Active air sampling and observations were made during 63 orthopedic implant operations.
The laminar airflow system resulted in a reduction of 89% in colony forming units in comparison with the displacement system (P
PubMed ID
24713595 View in PubMed
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Demographic factors and dental health of Swedish children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277517
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2016;74(3):178-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Ann-Catrin André Kramer
Magnus Hakeberg
Max Petzold
Anna-Lena Östberg
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2016;74(3):178-85
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Records - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Electronic Health Records - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth, Deciduous - pathology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the dental health of Swedish children and adolescents with reference to age, gender and residence.
Electronic dental records from 300,988 3-19-year-olds in one Swedish region were derived in a cross-sectional study in years 2007-2009. The DMFT system was used. Age was categorized into 3-6/7-9/10-12/13-15/16-17/18-19-year-olds and residence into 'metropolitan', 'urban' and 'rural' areas. ANOVA, generalized linear regression models and Fisher's exact test were used.
Among 7-9-year-old children, nine out of 10 were free from fillings and manifest caries, while for 18-19-year-olds; this proportion was one third. Girls (18-19-year-olds) had a significantly lower risk of caries compared to boys of the same age, RR for the DT index = 0.83 (95% CI = 0.81-0.85). This pattern was reversed in 7-12-year-old children. Children and adolescents in metropolitan and urban areas had significantly more caries than subjects in rural areas, for instance the RR for the DT index in metropolitan 7-9-year-olds was 2.26 (95% CI = 2.11-2.42) compared to their rural counterparts.
In the permanent dentition, the overall pattern revealed that girls = 12 years had a higher risk of caries, while adolescent girls had a lower risk of caries, both compared with boys of corresponding ages. Living in an urban or metropolitan area entailed a higher risk of caries than living in a rural area. A greater occurrence of dental caries in adolescents than in children was confirmed. The findings should have implications for planning and evaluation of oral health promotion and disease prevention activities.
PubMed ID
26133545 View in PubMed
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