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Increasing prevalence of coeliac disease in Denmark: a linkage study combining national registries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101566
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 Jul 1;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2011
Author
Stine Dydensborg
Peter Toftedal
Matteo Biaggi
Søren T Lillevang
Dorte G Hansen
Steffen Husby
Author Affiliation
.Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark .Department of Pathology, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark .Department of Clinical Immunology, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark .Research Unit of General Practice, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense C, Denmark.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 Jul 1;
Date
Jul-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Aim: To determine the prevalence and incidence of diagnosed coeliac disease (CD) in Danish children and adolescents and to describe trends over time. Methods: All children with a CD diagnosis registered in the Danish National Patient Registry (DNPR) were included in the study. Data were validated by combining this information with registrations of small-bowel biopsies in the National Registry of Pathology (NRP) and with a selected sample of hospital records. Results: Data were obtained from 1996 to 2010. The prevalence of CD registered in DNPR increased from 43.2 [95% CI 39.3-47.1] to 83.6 [95% CI 78.4-88.7] per 100 000, and the incidence increased from 2.8 [95% CI 1.9-3.9] to 10.0 [95% CI 8.4-12.0] per 100 000; 56% of the children had at least one biopsy compatible with CD registered in NRP. The incidence of biopsy-verified CD increased from 0.8 [95% CI 0.3-1.4] to 6.9 [95% CI 5.4-8.4] per 100 000. The mean age at diagnosis increased from 5.1 [95% CI 3.5-6.6] to 8.1 [95% CI 7.2-9.0] years of age. The proportion of children with associated diseases did not change over time. Conclusion: The prevalence of diagnosed CD in Danish children and adolescents has increased over the last 15 years.
PubMed ID
21722173 View in PubMed
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