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Can anatomical and functional features in the upper airways predict sleep apnea? A population-based study in females.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169165
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2006 Jun;126(6):613-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Malin Svensson
Mats Holmstrom
Jan-Erik Broman
Eva Lindberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head- and Neck Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. malin.l.svensson@akademiska.se
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2006 Jun;126(6):613-20
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Airway Obstruction - diagnosis - physiopathology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Laryngoscopy
Middle Aged
Palate, Soft - physiopathology
Pharynx - physiopathology
Polysomnography
Pulmonary Ventilation - physiology
Retrognathia - diagnosis - physiopathology
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - etiology - physiopathology
Snoring - physiopathology
Sweden
Uvula - physiopathology
Abstract
The importance of clinical findings in the nose and throat, including fiberoptic endoscopy during the Muller maneuver, in predicting sleep apnea is greater in normal-weight than in overweight women.
The aim of this study was to identify clinical features that could predict sleep apnea in women.
From 6817 women who previously answered a questionnaire concerning snoring habits, 230 women who reported habitual snoring and 170 women from the whole cohort went through a full-night polysomnography. A nose and throat examination including fiber endoscopic evaluation of the upper airways during the Muller maneuver was performed in a random selection of 132 women aged 20-70 years.
Sleep apnea was defined as an apnea-hypopnea index of > or = 10. The influence of clinical features on the prevalence of sleep apnea varied between normal-weight and overweight women. A low soft palate, retrognathia, the uvula touching the posterior pharyngeal wall in the supine position, and a 75% or more collapse at the soft palate during the Muller maneuver were all significant predictors of sleep apnea in women with a body mass index (BMI)
PubMed ID
16720446 View in PubMed
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Chronic Rhinosinusitis Impairs Sleep Quality: Results of the GA2LEN Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286871
Source
Sleep. 2017 Jan 01;40(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-01-2017
Author
Caroline Bengtsson
Eva Lindberg
Lars Jonsson
Mats Holmström
Fredrik Sundbom
Jan Hedner
Andrei Malinovschi
Roelinde Middelveld
Bertil Forsberg
Christer Janson
Source
Sleep. 2017 Jan 01;40(1)
Date
Jan-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Rhinitis - complications - diagnosis
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sinusitis - complications - diagnosis
Sleep Wake Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To analyze the prevalence of sleep problems in subjects with Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and to determine whether the disease severity of CRS affects sleep quality.
Questionnaires were sent to a random sample of 45 000 adults in four Swedish cities. Questions on CRS, asthma, allergic rhinitis, co-morbidities, tobacco use, educational level, and physical activity were included. CRS was defined according to the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EPOS) epidemiological criteria. The disease severity of CRS was defined by the number of reported CRS symptoms. Sleep quality was assessed using the Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire.
Of the 26 647 subjects, 2249 (8.4%) had CRS. Reported sleep problems were 50%-90% more common among subjects with CRS compared with those without or the total population. The prevalence of reported sleep problems increased in conjunction with the severity of CRS. After adjusting for gender, BMI, age, tobacco use, asthma, somatic diseases, physical activity level, and educational level, participants with four symptoms of CRS (compared with subjects without CRS symptoms) displayed a higher risk of snoring (adj. OR [95% CI]: 3.13 [2.22-4.41]), difficulties inducing sleep (3.98 [2.94-5.40]), difficulties maintaining sleep (3.44 [2.55-4.64]), early morning awakening (4.71 [3.47-6.38]) and excessive daytime sleepiness (4.56 [3.36-6.18]). The addition of persistent allergic rhinitis to CRS further increased the risk of sleep problems.
Sleep problems are highly prevalent among subjects with CRS. The disease severity of CRS negatively affects sleep quality.
PubMed ID
28364469 View in PubMed
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Does the oral steroid treatment of patients with nasal polyposis cause osteopenia or osteoporosis?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309950
Source
Clin Otolaryngol. 2019 11; 44(6):1011-1016
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
11-2019
Author
Pernilla Sahlstrand-Johnson
Mats Holmström
Anders Ehnhage
Author Affiliation
Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Clin Otolaryngol. 2019 11; 44(6):1011-1016
Date
11-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Administration, Oral
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - adverse effects
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density
Bone Diseases, Metabolic - chemically induced - diagnosis
Chronic Disease
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nasal Polyps - complications - drug therapy
Osteoporosis - chemically induced - diagnosis
Prospective Studies
Rhinitis - complications - drug therapy
Sinusitis - complications - drug therapy
Sweden
Abstract
We aimed to investigate the bone mineral density (BMD) in a group of Swedish patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP) with or without asthma, as well as to evaluate whether the treatment of this patient group is in accordance with the EPOS recommendations.
Adult patients with a diagnosis of CRSwNP, and a history of at least two courses of oral corticosteroids (OCS) during the last year, were consecutively included in this study at five centres.
The BMD of the patients was measured by Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), which is the only technology for classifying BMD according to the criteria established by WHO.
A total of 51 patients, with an average number of 7 years with OCS treatment, were enrolled. During the last 12 months, the mean number of OCS courses was 2.76, and the total mean intake was 891 mg of Prednisone equivalents. According to the T-scores, 17 patients were measured to have =-1 SD T-score lumbar spine, which is considered to be osteopenia, and five patients had
PubMed ID
31529761 View in PubMed
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Early childhood IgE reactivity to pathogenesis-related class 10 proteins predicts allergic rhinitis in adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264805
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2015 May;135(5):1199-206.e1-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Marit Westman
Christian Lupinek
Jean Bousquet
Niklas Andersson
Sandra Pahr
Alexandra Baar
Anna Bergström
Mats Holmström
Pär Stjärne
Karin C Lødrup Carlsen
Kaj-Håkon Carlsen
Josep M Antó
Rudolf Valenta
Marianne van Hage
Magnus Wickman
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2015 May;135(5):1199-206.e1-11
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Antigens, Plant - immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Cross Reactions - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Incidence
Prognosis
Rhinitis, Allergic - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Component-resolved diagnosis might improve the prediction of future allergy in young children.
We sought to investigate the association between IgE reactivity to the pathogenesis-related class 10 (PR-10) protein family and allergic rhinitis to birch pollen (ARbp) from early childhood up to age 16 years.
Questionnaire data and sera obtained at 4, 8, and 16 years of age from the Barn/Children Allergi/Allergy Milieu Stockholm Epidemiologic (BAMSE) study birth cohort were used. Sera from 764 children were analyzed for IgE reactivity to 9 PR-10 allergen proteins at the 3 time points by using an allergen chip based on ISAC technology. ARbp was defined as upper airway symptoms during birch pollen exposure.
IgE reactivity to Bet v 1 was found in 12%, 17%, and 25% of children at 4, 8, and 16 years of age. IgE reactivity of PR-10 proteins showed a hierarchic intrarelationship: Bet v 1 > Mal d 1 > Cor a 1.04 > Ara h 8 > Pru p 1 > Aln g 1 > Api g 1 > Act d 8 > Gly m 4. There was an increased risk of incidence and persistence of ARbp up to age 16 years with increasing levels of Bet v 1-specific IgE or increasing numbers of IgE-reactive PR-10 proteins at 4 years. Children with severe ARbp at age 16 years had higher levels of Bet v 1-specific IgE at age 4 years compared with children with mild symptoms.
ARbp at age 16 years can be predicted by analysis of IgE reactivity to PR-10 proteins in early childhood.
PubMed ID
25528361 View in PubMed
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EDITOR'S CHOICE: objective assessment of the nasal airway in unilateral cleft lip and palate--a long-term study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97180
Source
Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 2010 May;47(3):217-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Maria Mani
Staffan Morén
Ornolfur Thorvardsson
Olafur Jakobsson
Valdemar Skoog
Mats Holmström
Source
Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 2010 May;47(3):217-24
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To objectively evaluate the nasal function in adults operated on for unilateral cleft lip and palate with one-stage or two-stage palate closure. DESIGN: The population consists of all unilateral cleft lip and palate patients born from 1960 to 1987 and treated at the Cleft Lip and Palate Center, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. The patients were treated according to the same protocol except for palate closure, which was performed in one stage until 1977 and in two stages thereafter. Eighty-three patients participated. Mean follow-up time after primary surgery was 32 years. An age-matched control group underwent the same examinations. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Nasal minimum cross-sectional area (cm(2)) and volume (cm(3)) were assessed (acoustic rhinometry). Airflow resistance (Pa s/cm(3)) (rhinomanometry), peak inspiratory flow (L/min) (peak nasal inspiratory flow), and number of identified odors (Scandinavian Odor Identification Test) were determined. RESULTS: The cleft side of unilateral cleft lip and palate patients had significantly lower values for all parameters compared with controls (p
PubMed ID
20426672 View in PubMed
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Initial size of cleft does not correlate with size and function of nasal airway in adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101669
Source
J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2011 Jun;45(3):129-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Erika Reiser
Anna Andlin-Sobocki
Maria Mani
Mats Holmström
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. erika.reiser@surgsci.uu.se
Source
J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2011 Jun;45(3):129-35
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The noses of patients with clefts are often functionally inadequate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between size of the maxillary cleft in infancy and size and function of the nasal airway in adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). This is a long-term follow up study including 53 patients with UCLP born between 1960 and 1987 and treated at the Cleft Lip and Palate Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. Lip repair was performed at 3-4 months of age followed by either a one-stage or a two-stage palatal closure. The size of the cleft was measured on infant maxillary dental casts. Nasal minimum cross-sectional area (cm(2)) and volume (cm(3)) (acoustic rhinometry), air flow resistance (Pa s/cm(3)) (rhinomanometry), peak inspiratory flow (l/min) (peak nasal inspiratory flow) and number of identified odours (Scandinavian odor-identification test) were assessed in adulthood. The size of the maxillary cleft varied considerably at infancy. The size of the nasal airway and its function on the cleft side in adulthood were reduced compared with the non-cleft side, but no correlations were found between size of the initial cleft in infancy and size and function of the nasal airway in adulthood. In adults born with UCLP, therefore, size of the maxillary cleft in infancy does not seem to affect size and function of the nasal airway in adulthood.
PubMed ID
21682609 View in PubMed
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Nasal symptoms and clinical findings in adult patients treated for unilateral cleft lip and palate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114200
Source
J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2013 Oct;47(5):383-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Staffan Morén
Maria Mani
Kristina Lundberg
Mats Holmström
Author Affiliation
Section of Otorhinolaryngology.
Source
J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2013 Oct;47(5):383-9
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cleft Lip - complications - diagnosis - surgery
Cleft Palate - complications - diagnosis - surgery
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Nasal Cavity - physiopathology
Nasal Mucosa - physiopathology
Nasal Obstruction - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Nose Deformities, Acquired - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - methods
Reference Values
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate self-experienced nasal symptoms among adults treated for UCLP and the association to clinical findings, and to evaluate whether palate closure in one-stage or two-stages affected the symptoms or clinical findings. All people with UCLP born between 1960-1987, treated at Uppsala University Hospital, were considered for participation in this cross-sectional population study with long-term follow-up. Eighty-three patients (76% participation rate) participated, a mean of 37 years after the first operation. Fifty-two patients were treated with one-stage palate closure and 31 with two-stage palate closure. An age-matched group of 67 non-cleft controls completed the same study protocol, which included a questionnaire regarding nasal symptoms, nasal inspection, anterior rhinoscopy, and nasal endoscopy. Patients reported a higher frequency of nasal symptoms compared with the control group, e.g., nasal obstruction (81% compared with 60%) and mouth breathing (20% compared with 5%). Patients also rated their nasal symptoms as having a more negative impact on their daily life and physical activities than controls. Nasal examination revealed higher frequencies of nasal deformities among patients. No positive correlation was found between nasal symptoms and severity of findings at nasal examination. No differences were identified between patients treated with one-stage and two-stage palate closure regarding symptoms or nasal findings. Adult patients treated for UCLP suffer from more nasal symptoms than controls. However, symptoms are not associated with findings at clinical nasal examination or method of palate closure.
PubMed ID
23639332 View in PubMed
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Respiratory symptoms and lung function in relation to wood dust and monoterpene exposure in the wood pellet industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290727
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2017 Jun; 122(2):78-84
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Håkan Löfstedt
Katja Hagström
Ing-Liss Bryngelsson
Mats Holmström
Anna Rask-Andersen
Author Affiliation
a Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Örebro University , Örebro , Sweden.
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2017 Jun; 122(2):78-84
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - therapy
Cough
Dust
Forced expiratory volume
Health status
Humans
Hypersensitivity
Industry
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Monoterpenes - adverse effects
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Respiration
Respiratory Function Tests
Spirometry
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Time Factors
Vital Capacity
Wood
Young Adult
Abstract
Wood pellets are used as a source of renewable energy for heating purposes. Common exposures are wood dust and monoterpenes, which are known to be hazardous for the airways. The purpose of this study was to study the effect of occupational exposure on respiratory health in wood pellet workers.
Thirty-nine men working with wood pellet production at six plants were investigated with a questionnaire, medical examination, allergy screening, spirometry, and nasal peak expiratory flow (nasal PEF). Exposure to wood dust and monoterpenes was measured.
The wood pellet workers reported a higher frequency of nasal symptoms, dry cough, and asthma medication compared to controls from the general population. There were no differences in nasal PEF between work and leisure time. A lower lung function than expected (vital capacity [VC], 95%; forced vital capacity in 1?second [FEV1], 96% of predicted) was noted, but no changes were noted during shifts. There was no correlation between lung function and years working in pellet production. Personal measurements of wood dust at work showed high concentrations (0.16-19?mg/m3), and exposure peaks when performing certain work tasks. Levels of monoterpenes were low (0.64-28?mg/m3). There was no association between exposure and acute lung function effects.
In this study of wood pellet workers, high levels of wood dust were observed, and that may have influenced the airways negatively as the study group reported upper airway symptoms and dry cough more frequently than expected. The wood pellet workers had both a lower VC and FEV1 than expected. No cross-shift changes were found.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28276782 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.