Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Addressing food security of Aboriginal people in Canada

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284352
Source
Pages 832-833 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):832-833
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Mary Trifonopoulos
Author Affiliation
Food Security and Nutrition Unit, Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Division, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON
Source
Pages 832-833 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):832-833
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Abstract
In Canada, food insecurity is much higher among Aboriginal households than non-Aboriginal households and is especially pronounced in northern and isolated communities. The First Nations Food, Nutrition and Environment Study (FNFNES) found that 41% of on-reserve British Columbia First Nations households. were food insecure in 2008-2009 and that 38% of onreserve Manitoba First Nations households were food insecure in 2010. These prevalence rates are more than 5 times higher than those found among non-Aboriginal households in both provinces in the 2007-2008 Canadian Community Health Survey (1 ,2). Across the Canadian Arctic in 2007- 2008, 63% of Inuit households were found to be food insecure, with almost half (29%) severely food insecure (3).
Documents
Less detail

Healthy living in Nunavut: an on-line nutrition course for inuit communities in the Canadian arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3093
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Sep;63(3):243-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Sue Hamilton
Jeff Martin
Melissa Guyot
Mary Trifonopoulos
Amy Caughey
Hing Man Chan
Author Affiliation
Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill, University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Sep;63(3):243-50
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
Community Health Services - methods
Education, Distance - methods
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Inuits - education
Nutrition - education
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: It is recognized that empowerment of Indigenous Peoples through training and education is a priority. The objective was to design a course that would provide an innovative training approach to targeted workers in remote communities and enhance learning related to the Nunavut Food Guide, traditional food and nutrition, and diabetes prevention. STUDY DESIGN: A steering committee was established at the outset of the project with representation from McGill University and the Government of Nunavut (including nutritionists, community nurses and community health representatives (CHRs), as well as with members of the target audience. Course content and implementation, as well as recruitment of the target audience, were carried out with guidance from the steering committee. METHODS: An 8-week long course was developed for delivery in January - March, 2004. Learning activities included presentation of the course content through stories, online self-assessment quizzes, time-independent online discussions and telephone-based discussions. Invitations were extended to all prenatal nutrition program workers, CHRs, CHR students, home-care workers, Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative workers and public health nurses in Nunavut. RESULTS: Ninety-six health-care workers registered for Healthy Living in Nunavut, with 44 actively participating, 23 with less active participation and 29 who did not participate. CONCLUSIONS: Despite having to overcome numerous technological, linguistic and cultural barriers, approximately 40% of registrants actively participated in the online nutrition course. The internet may be a useful medium for delivery of information to target audiences in the North.
PubMed ID
15526928 View in PubMed
Less detail