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Cigarette smoking and hip volumetric bone mineral density and cortical volume loss in older adults: The AGES-Reykjavik study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299034
Source
Bone. 2018 03; 108:186-192
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Elisa A Marques
Martine Elbejjani
Vilmundur Gudnason
Gunnar Sigurdsson
Thomas Lang
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Thor Aspelund
Kristin Siggeirsdottir
Lenore Launer
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Tamara B Harris
Author Affiliation
National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA. Electronic address: elisa.marques@nih.gov.
Source
Bone. 2018 03; 108:186-192
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density
Bone Resorption - diagnostic imaging - pathology - physiopathology
Cigarette Smoking - adverse effects
Cortical Bone - diagnostic imaging - pathology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Pelvic Bones - diagnostic imaging - pathology - physiopathology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
This study aimed to explore the relationships of several indicators of cigarette smoking habits (smoking status, pack-years, age at smoking initiation and smoking cessation) with quantitative computed tomographic (QCT)-derived proximal femur bone measures (trabecular vBMD, integral vBMD and the ratio of cortical to total tissue volume (cvol/ivol)) and with subsequent change in these measures over the next five years. A total of 2673 older adults (55.9% women), aged 66-92?years at baseline from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study, who had two QCT scans of the hip were studied. In multivariable linear regression models, compared to never-smokers, current smokers had lower cvol/ivol at baseline and former-smokers had poorer measures on all outcomes (lower trabecular vBMD, integral vBMD and cvol/ivol), even when adjusted for several potential confounders. Further, among former smokers, those with higher pack-years had worse bone outcomes and those with longer duration since smoking cessation had better bone health at baseline. Analyses of change in bone measures revealed that compared to never-smokers, current smokers had significantly greater loss of trabecular vBMD, integral vBMD, and cvol/ivol. The regression models included adjustment for sex, age, education, and baseline body mass index, creatinine, % weight change from age 50, 25OHD, physical activity level, high-sensitive C-Reactive protein levels, alcohol and coffee consumption, history of diabetes mellitus, arthritis, and respiratory diseases. In conclusion, both current and former smoking showed adverse associations with bone health assessed with QCT. Results suggest that current smoking in particular may aggravate the rate of bone loss at older age and highlight implications for targeting this risk factor in populations that present higher smoking prevalence and vulnerability to bone fragility.
PubMed ID
29331300 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cigarette smoking and hip volumetric bone mineral density and cortical volume loss in older adults: The AGES-Reykjavik study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288242
Source
Bone. 2018 Mar;108:186-192
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Elisa A Marques
Martine Elbejjani
Vilmundur Gudnason
Gunnar Sigurdsson
Thomas Lang
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Thor Aspelund
Kristin Siggeirsdottir
Lenore Launer
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Tamara B Harris
Source
Bone. 2018 Mar;108:186-192
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This study aimed to explore the relationships of several indicators of cigarette smoking habits (smoking status, pack-years, age at smoking initiation and smoking cessation) with quantitative computed tomographic (QCT)-derived proximal femur bone measures (trabecular vBMD, integral vBMD and the ratio of cortical to total tissue volume (cvol/ivol)) and with subsequent change in these measures over the next five years. A total of 2673 older adults (55.9% women), aged 66-92?years at baseline from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study, who had two QCT scans of the hip were studied. In multivariable linear regression models, compared to never-smokers, current smokers had lower cvol/ivol at baseline and former-smokers had poorer measures on all outcomes (lower trabecular vBMD, integral vBMD and cvol/ivol), even when adjusted for several potential confounders. Further, among former smokers, those with higher pack-years had worse bone outcomes and those with longer duration since smoking cessation had better bone health at baseline. Analyses of change in bone measures revealed that compared to never-smokers, current smokers had significantly greater loss of trabecular vBMD, integral vBMD, and cvol/ivol. The regression models included adjustment for sex, age, education, and baseline body mass index, creatinine, % weight change from age 50, 25OHD, physical activity level, high-sensitive C-Reactive protein levels, alcohol and coffee consumption, history of diabetes mellitus, arthritis, and respiratory diseases. In conclusion, both current and former smoking showed adverse associations with bone health assessed with QCT. Results suggest that current smoking in particular may aggravate the rate of bone loss at older age and highlight implications for targeting this risk factor in populations that present higher smoking prevalence and vulnerability to bone fragility.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29331300 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cigarette smoking is associated with lower quadriceps cross-sectional area and attenuation in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299992
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2019 May 15; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-15-2019
Author
Elisa A Marques
Martine Elbejjani
Andrew Frank-Wilson
Vilmundur Gudnason
Gunnar Sigurdsson
Thomas Lang
Palmi V Jonsson
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Thor Aspelund
Kristin Siggeirsdottir
Lenore Launer
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Tamara B Harris
Author Affiliation
National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA.
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2019 May 15; :
Date
May-15-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In addition to well-established links with cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, cigarette smoking may affect skeletal muscle; however, associations with quadriceps atrophy, density, and function are unknown. This study explored the associations of current and former smoking with quadriceps muscle area and attenuation as well as muscle force (assessed as knee extension peak torque) and rate of torque development (RTD) - a measure of muscle power in older adults.
Data from 4469 older adults, aged 66-95 years at baseline in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility - Reykjavik Study with measurements of thigh computed tomography, isometric knee extension testing, self-reported smoking history and potential covariates were analyzed.
Sex-differences were observed in these data, therefore our final analyses are stratified by sex. In men, both former smokers and current smokers had lower muscle area (with = -0.10, 95% CI -0.17, -0.03 and = -0.19, 95% CI -0.33, -0.05, respectively) and lower muscle attenuation (i.e., higher fat infiltration, = -0.08, 95% CI -0.16, -0.01 and = -0.17, 95% CI -0.34, -0.01, respectively) when compared to never-smokers. Smoking status was not associated with male peak torque or RTD. In women, current smoking was associated with lower muscle attenuation (= -0.24, 95% CI -0.34, -0.13) compared to never-smoking. Among female smokers (current and former), muscle attenuation and peak torque were lower with increasing pack-years.
Results suggest that cigarette smoking is related to multiple muscle properties at older age and that these relationships may be different among men and women.
This manuscript presents novel data, as it examined for the first time the relationship between smoking and computed tomography-derived quadriceps muscle size (cross-sectional area) and attenuation.This study suggests that current cigarette smoking is related to higher muscle fat infiltration, which may have significant health implications for the older population, due to its known association with poor physical function, falls, and hip fractures.
PubMed ID
31091312 View in PubMed
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Proximal Femur Volumetric Bone Mineral Density and Mortality: 13 Years of Follow-Up of the AGES-Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290729
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2017 Jun; 32(6):1237-1242
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Elisa A Marques
Martine Elbejjani
Vilmundur Gudnason
Gunnar Sigurdsson
Thomas Lang
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Thor Aspelund
Osorio Meirelles
Kristin Siggeirsdottir
Lenore Launer
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Tamara B Harris
Author Affiliation
National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA.
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2017 Jun; 32(6):1237-1242
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Bone Density - physiology
Bone Resorption - mortality - pathology - physiopathology
Cancellous Bone - pathology - physiopathology
Cortical Bone - pathology - physiopathology
Demography
Female
Femur - pathology - physiopathology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mortality
Organ Size
Risk factors
Abstract
Bone mineral density (BMD) has been linked to mortality, but little is known about the independent contribution of each endosteal bone compartment and also the rate of bone loss to risk of mortality. We examined the relationships between (1) baseline trabecular and cortical volumetric BMD (vBMD) at the proximal femur, and (2) the rate of trabecular and cortical bone loss and all-cause mortality in older adults from the AGES-Reykjavik study. The analysis of trabecular and cortical vBMD and mortality was based on the baseline cohort of 4654 participants (aged =66 years) with a median follow-up of 9.4 years; the association between rate of bone loss and mortality was based on 2653 participants with bone loss data (median follow-up of 5.6 years). Analyses employed multivariable Cox-proportional models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with time-varying fracture status; trabecular and cortical variables were included together in all models. Adjusted for important confounders, Cox models showed that participants in the lowest quartile of trabecular vBMD had an increased risk of mortality compared to participants in other quartiles (HR?=?1.12; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01 to 1.25); baseline cortical vBMD was not related to mortality (HR?=?1.08; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.20). After adjustment for time-dependent fracture status, results were attenuated and not statistically significant. A faster loss (quartile 1 versus quartiles 2-4) in both trabecular and cortical bone was associated with higher mortality risk (HR?=?1.37 and 1.33, respectively); these associations were independent of major potential confounders including time-dependent incident fractures (HR?=?1.32 and 1.34, respectively). Overall, data suggest that faster bone losses over time in both the trabecular and cortical bone compartments are associated with mortality risk and that measurements of change in bone health may be more informative than single-point measurements in explaining mortality differences in older adults. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28276125 View in PubMed
Less detail

Proximal Femur Volumetric Bone Mineral Density and Mortality: 13 Years of Follow-Up of the AGES-Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280745
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2017 Mar 09;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-09-2017
Author
Elisa A Marques
Martine Elbejjani
Vilmundur Gudnason
Gunnar Sigurdsson
Thomas Lang
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Thor Aspelund
Osorio Meirelles
Kristin Siggeirsdottir
Lenore Launer
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Tamara B Harris
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2017 Mar 09;
Date
Mar-09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Bone mineral density (BMD) has been linked to mortality, but little is known about the independent contribution of each endosteal bone compartment and also the rate of bone loss to risk of mortality. We examined the relationships between (1) baseline trabecular and cortical volumetric BMD (vBMD) at the proximal femur, and (2) the rate of trabecular and cortical bone loss and all-cause mortality in older adults from the AGES-Reykjavik study. The analysis of trabecular and cortical vBMD and mortality was based on the baseline cohort of 4654 participants (aged =66 years) with a median follow-up of 9.4 years; the association between rate of bone loss and mortality was based on 2653 participants with bone loss data (median follow-up of 5.6 years). Analyses employed multivariable Cox-proportional models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with time-varying fracture status; trabecular and cortical variables were included together in all models. Adjusted for important confounders, Cox models showed that participants in the lowest quartile of trabecular vBMD had an increased risk of mortality compared to participants in other quartiles (HR?=?1.12; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01 to 1.25); baseline cortical vBMD was not related to mortality (HR?=?1.08; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.20). After adjustment for time-dependent fracture status, results were attenuated and not statistically significant. A faster loss (quartile 1 versus quartiles 2-4) in both trabecular and cortical bone was associated with higher mortality risk (HR?=?1.37 and 1.33, respectively); these associations were independent of major potential confounders including time-dependent incident fractures (HR?=?1.32 and 1.34, respectively). Overall, data suggest that faster bone losses over time in both the trabecular and cortical bone compartments are associated with mortality risk and that measurements of change in bone health may be more informative than single-point measurements in explaining mortality differences in older adults. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
PubMed ID
28276125 View in PubMed
Less detail