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The best bang for our buck: Recommendations for the provision of training for tobacco action workers and Indigenous health workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101059
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2011 Dec;37(1):90-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Marlene Thompson
Author Affiliation
Public Health, Tropical Medicine & Rehabilitation Sciences; Nursing, Midwifery & Nutrition, James Cook University, Cairns QLD, Australia.
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2011 Dec;37(1):90-1
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Abstract While smoking rates among Australians in general have declined over the past two decades, rates for Aboriginal Australians have remained high and continue to contribute to the overall poor health of Aboriginal people. Aboriginal health workers are proposed as one way to help reduce smoking rates for Aboriginal people however there is a need for specifically developed courses to train health workers to deliver smoking interventions.
PubMed ID
21591830 View in PubMed
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Canadian physiotherapists' views on certification, specialisation, extended role practice, and entry-level training in rheumatology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150604
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2009;9:88
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Linda C Li
Marie D Westby
Evelyn Sutton
Marlene Thompson
Eric C Sayre
Lynn Casimiro
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. lli@arthritisresearch.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2009;9:88
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Certification
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Therapy Specialty
Professional Autonomy
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Rheumatology - education
Abstract
Since the last decade there has been a gradual change of boundaries of health professions in providing arthritis care. In Canada, some facilities have begun to adopt new arthritis care models, some of which involve physiotherapists (PT) working in extended roles. However, little is known about PTs' interests in these new roles. The primary objective of this survey was to determine the interests among orthopaedic physiotherapists (PTs) in being a certified arthritis therapist, a PT specialized in arthritis, or an extended scope practitioner in rheumatology, and to explore the associated factors, including the coverage of arthritis content in the entry-level physiotherapy training.
Six hundred PTs practicing in orthopaedics in Canada were randomly selected to receive a postal survey. The questionnaire covered areas related to clinical practice, perceptions of rheumatology training received, and attitudes toward PT roles in arthritis care. Logistic regression models were developed to explore the associations between PTs' interests in pursuing each of the three extended scope practice designations and the personal/professional/attitudinal variables.
We received 286 questionnaires (response rate = 47.7%); 258 contained usable data. The average length of time in practice was 15.4 years (SD = 10.4). About 1 in 4 PTs agreed that they were interested in assuming advanced practice roles (being a certified arthritis therapist = 28.9%, being a PT specialized in rheumatology = 23.3%, being a PT practitioner = 20.9%). Having a caseload of > or = 40% in arthritis, having a positive attitude toward advanced practice roles in arthritis care and toward the formal credentialing process, and recognizing the difference between certification and specialisation were associated with an interest in pursing advanced practice roles.
Orthopaedic PTs in Canada indicated a fair level of interest in pursuing certification, specialisation and extended scope practice roles in arthritis care. Future research should focus on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the emerging health service delivery models involving certified, specialized or extended scope practice PTs in the management of arthritis.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19490639 View in PubMed
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