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Early onset of sexual intercourse is an indicator for hazardous lifestyle and problematic life situation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125661
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Mar;27(1):20-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Marlene Makenzius
Margareta Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. marlene.makenzius@fhi.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Mar;27(1):20-6
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Coitus
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Sweden
Abstract
In public health efforts, knowledge about risk-groups is important for creating societal conditions to ensure good health on equal terms.
To investigate differences in lifestyle and perceived health among 15-year-old teenagers with experience of sexual intercourse (self-defined) and same-aged teenagers without experience of sexual intercourse.
A two-cluster questionnaire study among 15-year-old Swedish students (n = 2170) in 2009/10. Chi-squared test was used to identify differences between three groups: teenagers who had not had sexual intercourse; teenagers who had had sexual intercourse at age of 14 or younger; and teenagers who had had intercourse at an age of 15.
Thirty-two per cent (n = 334) of girls and 31% (n = 324) of boys had had sexual intercourse. Teenagers with experience of sexual intercourse at 15 years or younger used more tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs than same-aged teenagers without intercourse experience did. Furthermore, teenagers with experience of intercourse, especially those with a debut at 14 year or younger, had less positive school experiences, more involvement in injuries and physical violence, were less (girls) and more (boys) physically active, and perceived a poorer health than teenagers without intercourse experience.
Sexual intercourse at the age of 15 or younger is an indicator for a hazardous lifestyle and problematic life situation.
PubMed ID
22462801 View in PubMed
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Existential experiences and needs related to induced abortion in a group of Swedish women: a quantitative investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124715
Source
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2012 Jun;33(2):53-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Maria Liljas Stålhandske
Marlene Makenzius
Tanja Tydén
Margareta Larsson
Author Affiliation
Uppsala University, Department of Theology, Uppsala Religion and Society Research Centre, Sweden. maria.liljas@crs.uu.se
Source
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2012 Jun;33(2):53-61
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Death
Concept Formation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Emotions
Existentialism
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Life Change Events
Maternal-Fetal Relations - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted - psychology
Pregnant Women - psychology
Problem Solving
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate the prevalence of existential experiences and needs among women who have requested an induced abortion.
A questionnaire was used to collect information from 499 women who had requested an induced abortion. A principle component analysis resulted in three components of existential experiences and needs: existential thoughts, existential practices, and humanisation of the foetus. These components were analysed in relation to background data and other data from the questionnaire.
Existential experiences and needs were common. For 61% of women existential thoughts about life and death, meaning and morality were related to the abortion experience. Almost 50% of women reported a need for special acts in relation to the abortion; 67% of women thought of the pregnancy in terms of a child. A higher presence of existential components correlated to difficulty in making the abortion decision and poor psychological wellbeing after the abortion.
Women's experiences of abortion can include existential thoughts about life, death, meaning and morality, feelings of attachment to the foetus, and the need for symbolic expression. This presents a challenge for abortion personnel, as the situation involves complex aspects over and above medical procedures and routines.
PubMed ID
22554137 View in PubMed
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Repeat induced abortion - a matter of individual behaviour or societal factors? A cross-sectional study among Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101424
Source
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2011 Jul 21;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-21-2011
Author
Marlene Makenzius
Tanja Tydén
Elisabeth Darj
Margareta Larsson
Author Affiliation
* Department of Women's and Children's Health.
Source
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2011 Jul 21;
Date
Jul-21-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
ABSTRACT Background Almost 40% of all induced abortions in Sweden are repeat abortions; little is known about the risk factors. Objective To investigate differences between women who had a first-time abortion and those with repeat abortion, and to identify factors associated with repeat abortion. Methods A questionnaire was answered by 798 abortion-seeking women in Sweden during 2009. A regression model was used to assess risk factors for repeat abortions. Results In the age range 20-49 years, 41% of women had experienced at least one previous abortion. Risk factors for repeat abortion were parity (OR 2.57), lack of emotional support (OR 2.09), unemployment or sick leave (OR 1.65), tobacco use (OR 1.56), and low educational level (OR 1.5). Some women (n = 55) considered economic support and work opportunities could have enabled them to continue the pregnancy. Increased Sex and Relationship Education (SRE), easy access to high-quality contraception and counselling, were suggested (n = 86) as interventions for preventing unintended pregnancies. Conclusions Even in a country with long established SRE and a public health policy to enhance sexual and reproductive health over a third of women requesting abortion have experienced one previously and the rate is maintained. Some specific factors are identified but, overall, a picture of vulnerability among women seeking repeat abortion stands out that needs to be considered in the prevention of unintended pregnancies.
PubMed ID
21777046 View in PubMed
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Risk factors among men who have repeated experience of being the partner of a woman who requests an induced abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127308
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Mar;40(2):211-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Marlene Makenzius
Tanja Tydén
Elisabeth Darj
Margareta Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. marlene.makenzius@fhi.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Mar;40(2):211-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Men - psychology
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unplanned - psychology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Prevention of unintended pregnancies is a public health objective; however, the profiles of male partners of women who choose to abort are relatively unexplored.
To investigate risk factors among men who have repeated experience of being the partner of a woman electing an induced abortion.
A questionnaire was used to collect information from 590 men recruited through their pregnant partner who applied for an abortion in Sweden during 2009. A binary logistic regression model assessed risk factors associated with repeated experience of abortion.
One-third of the men had previous experience of a pregnant partner electing an induced abortion. Univariate analysis indicated these men were older, had a lower educational level and less emotional support, and were more often tobacco users than men for whom it was the first experience of a partner choosing to abort. Independent risk factors were being a victim of physical, psychological, or sexual violence or abuse over the past year (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.36-5.08), unemployment or sick leave (OR 2.58, 95% CI 1.57-4.25), and having children (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.22-3.28). The men suggested improved sex and relationship education in school and lower unemployment rates could prevent unintended pregnancies and abortions.
Men with experience of repeat abortions present a picture of vulnerability that should be recognised in the prevention of unintended pregnancies. Increased work opportunities might be one important intervention to reduce the number of abortions.
PubMed ID
22307996 View in PubMed
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[Sweden has the highest abortion rate among the Nordic countries. Unwanted pregnancies should be seen in a holistic perspective--individuals, health care, community].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106296
Source
Lakartidningen. 2013 Sep 18-24;110(38):1658-61
Publication Type
Article

Swedish public health policy: Impact on regional and local public health practice and priorities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278729
Source
J Public Health Policy. 2015 Aug;36(3):335-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Marlene Makenzius
Sarah Wamala
Source
J Public Health Policy. 2015 Aug;36(3):335-49
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Humans
Local Government
Public Health Practice
Regional Health Planning
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
We evaluated the Swedish National Public Health Policy to determine its impact on public health priorities and practice at regional and local levels between 2004 and 2013. We conducted a survey by questionnaire in February 2013 among Swedish county councils/regions (n=19/21), and municipalities (n=219/290). The National Public Health Policy facilitated systematic public health practice, particularly for planning, for high priority concerns, including conditions during childhood and adolescence, physical activity, and tobacco prevention. Respondents expressed need for a comprehensive monitoring system with comparable indicators nationwide and explicit measurable objectives. To ensure effective monitoring and follow-up, the measurable outcomes need direct relevance to decision making and high-priority public health issues addressing Sweden's "overarching public health goal" - to create societal conditions for good health on equal terms for the entire population.
PubMed ID
25789926 View in PubMed
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Women and men's satisfaction with care related to induced abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122912
Source
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2012 Aug;17(4):260-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Marlene Makenzius
Tanja Tydén
Elisabeth Darj
Margareta Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden. marlene.makenzius@fhi.se
Source
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2012 Aug;17(4):260-9
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Counseling
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Family Characteristics
Female
Gynecological Examination - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Information Services - standards - supply & distribution
Logistic Models
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychometrics
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Questionnaires
Sexual Partners - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate satisfaction with abortion care among women and their male partners, and to identify factors associated with high overall contentment with the care received.
A multi-centre cross-sectional questionnaire survey conducted in 2009 among 798 Swedish abortion-seeking women and 590 male partners was analysed with logistic regression.
Overall care satisfaction was rated high by two-thirds (74%) of the women and half (52%) of the men. For women, factors associated with high overall satisfaction with care were: to be well treated by the health care staff (Odds Ratio [OR] = 11.78), sufficient pain relief (OR = 3.87), adequate information about the gynaecological examination (OR = 2.25), suitable contraceptive counselling (OR = 2.23), and ease of access to the clinic by phone (OR = 1.91). For men, the factors were to be well treated by the health care staff (OR = 5.32), and adequate information about the abortion procedure (OR = 2.64).
Most women and half of the men were pleased with the attention they had received, but one in four women and half the men were not, or not completely, suggesting improvement is needed, especially with regard to men. For both women and men the human aspect of the care, namely, the consideration showed by the attending staff, appears to be the most important factor associated with satisfaction regarding abortion care.
PubMed ID
22758772 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.