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Alexithymia is common among adolescents with severe disruptive behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101585
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2011 Jul;199(7):506-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Marko Manninen
Sebastian Therman
Jaana Suvisaari
Hanna Ebeling
Irma Moilanen
Matti Huttunen
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
*Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; †Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; ‡Clinic of Child Psychiatry, Oulu University and University Hospital, Oulu, Finland; and §Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere and Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2011 Jul;199(7):506-9
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This study aimed to examine alexithymic features and associations between alexithymia and psychiatric symptoms among adolescents living in a closed institution because of severe behavioral problems. Forty-seven adolescents (29 boys and 18 girls) aged 15 to 18 years completed the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) Questionnaire and the Youth Self-Report, whereas their foster parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist. The TAS-20 scores of the participants were compared with those of an extensive population sample (N = 6000) matched by age and birth year. Reform school adolescents are significantly more alexithymic than the control group, and the TAS-20 scores are correlated with numerous psychiatric problems, mainly in the internalizing spectrum, but also with thought problems and self-reported aggression. Promoting abilities in identifying and describing feelings is important when treating delinquent adolescents.
PubMed ID
21716065 View in PubMed
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Predicting psychosis and psychiatric hospital care among adolescent psychiatric patients with the Prodromal Questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263214
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Sep;158(1-3):7-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Sebastian Therman
Maija Lindgren
Marko Manninen
Rachel L Loewy
Matti O Huttunen
Tyrone D Cannon
Jaana Suvisaari
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Sep;158(1-3):7-10
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Depersonalization
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods
Male
Prodromal Symptoms
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk
Self Report
Sensitivity and specificity
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The Prodromal Questionnaire (PQ) identifies psychiatric help-seekers in need of clinical interviews to diagnose psychosis risk. However, some providers use the PQ alone to identify risk. Therefore, we tested its predictive utility among 731 adolescent psychiatric help-seekers, with a 3-9-year register-based follow-up. Nine latent factors corresponded well with postulated subscales. Depersonalization predicted later hospitalization with a psychosis diagnosis (HR 1.6 per SD increase), and Role Functioning predicted any psychiatric hospitalization (HR 1.3). Published cut-off scores were poor predictors of psychosis; endorsement rates were very high for most symptoms. Therefore, we do not recommend using the PQ without second-stage clinical interviews.
PubMed ID
25062972 View in PubMed
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Prodromal psychosis screening in adolescent psychiatry clinics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131714
Source
Early Interv Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;6(1):69-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Rachel L Loewy
Sebastian Therman
Marko Manninen
Matti O Huttunen
Tyrone D Cannon
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0984, USA. rloewy@lppi.ucsf.edu
Source
Early Interv Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;6(1):69-75
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Community Mental Health Services - methods
Early Diagnosis
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Predictive value of tests
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis
Questionnaires
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Research has identified a syndrome conferring ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis, although UHR interviews require intensive staff training, time and patient burden. Previously, we developed the Prodromal Questionnaire (PQ) to screen more efficiently for UHR syndromes.
This study examined the concurrent validity of the PQ against UHR status and preliminary predictive validity for later psychotic disorder.
We assessed a consecutive patient sample of 408 adolescents who presented to psychiatry clinics in Helsinki, Finland, seeking mental health treatment, including 80 participants who completed the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes (SIPS).
A cut-off score of 18 or more positive symptoms on the PQ predicted UHR diagnoses on the SIPS with 82% sensitivity and 49% specificity. Three of 14 (21%) participants with high PQ scores and SIPS UHR diagnoses developed full psychotic disorders within 1 year.
Using the PQ and SIPS together can be an efficient two-stage screening process for prodromal psychosis in mental health clinics.
PubMed ID
21883972 View in PubMed
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The relationship between performance and fMRI signal during working memory in patients with schizophrenia, unaffected co-twins, and control subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167127
Source
Schizophr Res. 2007 Jan;89(1-3):191-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Katherine H Karlsgodt
David C Glahn
Theo G M van Erp
Sebastian Therman
Matti Huttunen
Marko Manninen
Jaakko Kaprio
Mark S Cohen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Tyrone D Cannon
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, USA.
Source
Schizophr Res. 2007 Jan;89(1-3):191-7
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attention - physiology
Brain Mapping
Color Perception - physiology
Discrimination Learning - physiology
Diseases in Twins - genetics - physiopathology
Dominance, Cerebral - physiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Memory, Short-Term - physiology
Middle Aged
Occipital Lobe - physiopathology
Oxygen - blood
Parietal Lobe - physiopathology
Pattern Recognition, Visual - physiology
Prefrontal Cortex - physiopathology
Schizophrenia - genetics - physiopathology
Abstract
While behavioral research shows working memory impairments in schizophrenics and their relatives, functional neuroimaging studies of patients and healthy controls show conflicting findings of hypo- and hyperactivation, possibly indicating different relationships between physiological activity and performance. In a between-subjects regression analysis of fMRI activation and performance, low performance was associated with relatively lower activation in patients than controls, while higher performance was associated with higher activation in patients than controls in DLPFC and parietal cortex, but not occipital cortex, with unaffected twins of schizophrenics being intermediate between the groups. Accordingly, this supports the idea that both hyper and hypoactivation may be possible along a continuum of behavioral performance in a way consistent with a neural inefficiency model. Further, this study offers preliminary evidence that the relationship between behavior and physiology in schizophrenia may be heritable.
PubMed ID
17029749 View in PubMed
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