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Coffee consumption and risk of rare cancers in Scandinavian countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297621
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 03; 33(3):287-302
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Marko Lukic
Lena Maria Nilsson
Guri Skeie
Bernt Lindahl
Tonje Braaten
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsö, Norway. marko.lukic@uit.no.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 03; 33(3):287-302
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Caffeine - administration & dosage
Coffee - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Studies on the association between heavy coffee consumption and risk of less frequently diagnosed cancers are scarce. We aimed to quantify the association between filtered, boiled, and total coffee consumption and the risk of bladder, esophageal, kidney, pancreatic, and stomach cancers. We used data from the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study and the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Information on coffee consumption was available for 193,439 participants. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the investigated cancer sites by category of total, filtered, and boiled coffee consumption. Heavy filtered coffee consumers (= 4 cups/day) had a multivariable adjusted HR of 0.74 of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer (95% CI 0.57-0.95) when compared with light filtered coffee consumers (= 1 cup/day). We did not observe significant associations between total or boiled coffee consumption and any of the investigated cancer sites, neither in the entire study sample nor in analyses stratified by sex. We found an increased risk of bladder cancer among never smokers who were heavy filtered or total coffee consumers, and an increased risk of stomach cancer in never smokers who were heavy boiled coffee consumers. Our data suggest that increased filtered coffee consumption might reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. We did not find evidence of an association between coffee consumption and the risk of esophageal or kidney cancer. The increased risk of bladder and stomach cancer was confined to never smokers.
PubMed ID
29476356 View in PubMed
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Coffee consumption and the risk of cancer in the Norwegian Women and Cancer (NOWAC) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289340
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2016 09; 31(9):905-16
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2016
Author
Marko Lukic
Idlir Licaj
Eiliv Lund
Guri Skeie
Elisabete Weiderpass
Tonje Braaten
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, 9037, Tromsø, Norway. marko.lukic@uit.no.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2016 09; 31(9):905-16
Date
09-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Coffee - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
An association between coffee consumption and cancer has long been investigated. Coffee consumption among Norwegian women is high, thus this is a favorable population in which to study the impact of coffee on cancer incidence. Information on coffee consumption was collected from 91,767 women at baseline in the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study. These information were applied until follow-up information on coffee consumption, collected 6-8 years after baseline, became available. Multiple imputation was performed as a method for dealing with missing data. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for breast, colorectal, lung, and ovarian cancer, as well as cancer at any site. We observed a 17 % reduced risk of colorectal cancer (HR = 0.83, 95 % CI 0.70-0.98, p trend across categories of consumption = 0.10) and a 9 % reduced risk of cancer at any site (HR = 0.91, 95 % CI 0.86-0.97, p trend = 0.03) in women who drank more than 3 and up to 7 cups/day, compared to women who drank =1 cup/day. A significantly increased risk of lung cancer was observed with a heavy coffee consumption (>7 vs. =1 cup/day HR = 2.01, 95 % CI 1.47-2.75, p trend 5 vs. =1 cup/day HR = 1.42, 95 % CI 0.44-4.57, p trend = 0.30). No significant association was found between coffee consumption and the risk of breast or ovarian cancer. In this study, coffee consumption was associated with a modest reduced risk of cancer at any site. Residual confounding due to smoking may have contributed to the positive association between high coffee consumption and the risk of lung cancer.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27010635 View in PubMed
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Coffee consumption and the risk of malignant melanoma in the Norwegian Women and Cancer (NOWAC) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286342
Source
BMC Cancer. 2016 Jul 29;16:562
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-29-2016
Author
Marko Lukic
Mie Jareid
Elisabete Weiderpass
Tonje Braaten
Source
BMC Cancer. 2016 Jul 29;16:562
Date
Jul-29-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Coffee
Drinking Behavior
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sunburn - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Coffee contains biologically-active substances that suppress carcinogenesis in vivo, and coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of malignant melanoma. We studied the impact of total coffee consumption and of different brewing methods on the incidence of malignant melanoma in a prospective cohort of Norwegian women.
We had baseline information on total coffee consumption and consumption of filtered, instant, and boiled coffee from self-administered questionnaires for 104,080 women in the Norwegian Women and Cancer (NOWAC) Study. We also had follow-up information collected 6-8 years after baseline. Multiple imputation was used to deal with missing data, and multivariable Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for malignant melanoma by consumption category of total, filtered, instant, and boiled coffee.
During 1.7 million person-years of follow-up, 762 cases of malignant melanoma were diagnosed. Compared to light consumers of filtered coffee (=1 cup/day), we found a statistically significant inverse association with low-moderate consumption (>1-3 cups/day, HR?=?0.80; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.98) and high-moderate consumption of filtered coffee (>3-5 cups/day, HR?=?0.77; 95 % CI 0.61-0.97) and melanoma risk (p trend?=?0.02). We did not find a statistically significant association between total, instant, or boiled coffee consumption and the risk of malignant melanoma in any of the consumption categories.
The data from the NOWAC Study indicate that a moderate intake of filtered coffee could reduce the risk of malignant melanoma.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27473841 View in PubMed
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Determinants of Transitional Zone Area and Porosity of the Proximal Femur Quantified In Vivo in Postmenopausal Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268057
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2015 Nov 20;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-2015
Author
Rajesh Shigdel
Marit Osima
Marko Lukic
Luai A Ahmed
Ragnar M Joakimsen
Erik F Eriksen
Åshild Bjørnerem
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2015 Nov 20;
Date
Nov-20-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Bone architecture as size and shape is important for bone strength and risk of fracture. Most bone loss is cortical and occurs by trabecularisation of the inner part of the cortex. We therefore wanted to identify determinants of the bone architecture, especially the area and porosity of the transitional zone, an inner cortical region with a large surface/matrix volume available for intracortical remodeling. In 211 postmenopausal women aged 54-94 years with non-vertebral fractures and 232 controls from the Tromsø Study, Norway, we quantified femoral subtrochanteric architecture in CT images using StrAx1.0 software, and serum levels of bone turnover markers (BTM). Multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses were used to quantify associations of age, weight, height, and bone size with bone architecture and BTM, and odds ratio (OR) for fracture. Increasing age, height and larger total cross-sectional area (TCSA) were associated with larger transitional zone CSA and transitional zone CSA/TCSA (standardized coefficients (STB)?=?0.11-0.80, p = 0.05). Increasing weight was associated with larger TCSA, but smaller transitional zone CSA/TCSA and thicker cortices (STB?=?0.15-0.22, p?
PubMed ID
26588794 View in PubMed
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Gender specific association between the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and alcohol consumption and injuries caused by drinking in the sixth Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295248
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2018 Aug 13; 18(1):239
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-13-2018
Author
Kristina Sivertsen
Marko Lukic
Agnete E Kristoffersen
Author Affiliation
Department for drugs - and addiction treatment and A-larm Norway, Hospital of Southern Norway, Kristiansand, Norway.
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2018 Aug 13; 18(1):239
Date
Aug-13-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Complementary Therapies - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Self Care
Sex Factors
Wounds and Injuries - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
Alcohol is consumed almost worldwide and is the most widely used recreational drug in the world. Harmful use of alcohol is known to cause a large disease-, social- and economic burden on society. Only a few studies have examined the relationship between CAM use and alcohol consumption. To our knowledge there has been no such research in Norway. The aim of this study is to describe and compare alcohol consumption and injuries related to alcohol across gender and different CAM approaches.
The data used in this study is based on questionnaire data gathered from the sixth Tromsø Study conducted between 2007 and 2008. Information on CAM use and alcohol consumption was available for 6819 women and 5994 men, 64.8% of the invited individuals. Pearson chi-square tests and independent sample t-tests were used to describe the basic characteristics of the participants and to calculate the differences between men and women regarding these variables. Binary logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the associations between the different CAM approaches and alcohol consumptions and injuries caused by drinking.
Women who drank alcohol more than once a month were more likely to have applied herbal or "natural" medicine and self-treatment techniques (meditation, yoga, qi gong or tai-chi), compared to those who never drank, and those who only drank monthly or less. For women, an association was also found between having experienced injuries caused by drinking and use of self-treatment techniques and visit to a CAM practitioner. No association was found between amount of alcohol consumed and use of CAM approaches. For men, an association was found between injuries caused by drinking and use of herbal or "natural" medicine.
The findings from this cross-sectional study suggests that women who drink frequently are more likely to use "natural" medicine and self-treatment techniques. Both men and women who had experienced injuries because of their drinking were more likely to have used CAM approaches.
Notes
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PubMed ID
30103714 View in PubMed
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