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Cardiac arrest and hypothermia treatment--function and life satisfaction among survivors in the first 6 months.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260282
Source
Resuscitation. 2014 Apr;85(4):538-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Ewa Wallin
Ing-Marie Larsson
Sten Rubertsson
Marja-Leena Kristofferzon
Source
Resuscitation. 2014 Apr;85(4):538-43
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition Disorders - etiology - psychology
Female
Heart Arrest - psychology - therapy
Humans
Hypothermia, Induced
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Sex Factors
Survivors - psychology
Sweden
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe differences over time in outcome, physical and cognitive function among survivors of cardiac arrest treated with hypothermia and to examine survivors' life satisfaction 6 months after cardiac arrest as well as gender differences.
The study was prospective and included 45 cardiac arrest survivors admitted to three Swedish hospitals between 2008 and 2012. Participants were followed from intensive care unit discharge to one and six months after cardiac arrest. In addition to cerebral performance category (CPC), participants were asked to complete questionnaires regarding activities in daily life (Barthel index), cognitive function (mini mental state examination), and life satisfaction (LiSat-11).
Outcome measured using CPC scores improved over time. At 6 months, all participants were classified as having a good outcome. At one month, participants were impaired but improved over time in their activities in daily life and cognitive function. At 6 months satisfaction with "life as a whole" was seen in 70%.
Cardiac arrest survivors are satisfied with life as a whole despite a severe illness that has impaired their physical and cognitive function, which seemed to improve over time. Predicting patients' functional outcome in early stages is difficult, and the CPC score alone is not sufficient to assess patients' function. It is a need to reach a consensus to which instruments best reflect physical and cognitive function as well as to specify a rehabilitation plan.
Notes
Comment In: Resuscitation. 2014 Apr;85(4):454-524530400
PubMed ID
24389358 View in PubMed
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District nurses' and registered nurses' training in and use of motivational interviewing in primary care settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267648
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2014 Aug;23(15-16):2284-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Ann-Sofi Östlund
Barbro Wadensten
Elisabeth Häggström
Marja-Leena Kristofferzon
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2014 Aug;23(15-16):2284-93
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Inservice training
Male
Middle Aged
Motivational Interviewing - utilization
Nurses
Nursing Process
Primary Health Care
Questionnaires
Sweden
Workplace
Abstract
To examine to what extent district nurses and registered nurses have training in motivational interviewing, to what extent they use it and what prerequisites they have for using it; to compare district nurses and registered nurses, as well as to compare users and nonusers of motivational interviewing; and to examine possible relationships between use of motivational interviewing and the variables training, supervision and feedback in motivational interviewing and prerequisites for use.
Motivational interviewing is an effective method for motivating patients to change their lifestyle, used increasingly in primary care.
A cross-sectional survey study.
A study-specific questionnaire was sent to all district nurses and registered nurses (n = 980) in primary care in three counties in Sweden, from September 2011-January 2012; 673 (69%) responded. Differences between groups as well as relationships between study variables were tested.
According to self-reports, 59% of the respondents had training in motivational interviewing and 57% used it. Approximately 15% of those who reported using it had no specific training in the method. More district nurses than registered nurses had training in motivational interviewing and used it. The following factors were independently associated with the use of motivational interviewing: training in and knowledge of motivational interviewing, conditions for using it, time and absence of 'other' obstacles.
Having knowledge in motivational interviewing and personal as well as workplace prerequisites for using it may promote increased use of motivational interviewing.
Having the prerequisites for using motivational interviewing at the workplace is of significance to the use of motivational interviewing. In the context of primary care, district nurses seem to have better prerequisites than registered nurses for using motivational interviewing.
PubMed ID
24372665 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a Swedish version of the Watts Sexual Function Questionnaire (WSFQ) in persons with heart disease: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146091
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010 Sep;9(3):168-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Marja-Leena Kristofferzon
Ingela Johansson
Margareta Brännström
Eva Arenhall
Amir Baigi
David Brunt
Bengt Fridlund
Ulrica Nilsson
Sylvi Persson
Mikael Rask
Inger Wieslander
Bodil Ivarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Caring Science and Sociology, University of Gävle, SE-801 76 Gävle, Sweden. mko@hig.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010 Sep;9(3):168-74
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arousal - physiology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Heart Diseases - physiopathology - psychology
Humans
Male
Penile Erection - physiology
Pilot Projects
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior
Sweden
Abstract
As part of preparation for a Swedish multicentre study, exploring sexual and married life in patients with myocardial infarction and their partners, a Swedish validated instrument was required.
The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of a Swedish version of the Watts Sexual Function Questionnaire (WSFQ) among persons with a heart disease.
A convenience sample of 79 persons (47 men and 32 women) living with a heart disease was recruited from the members of the National Association of Heart and Lung Patients. They completed a Swedish version of the WSFQ on two occasions.
Two separate factor analyses each revealed a two-factor structure on both occasions: "Sexual appetite" and "Sexual expectations" with gender-neutral questions and "Sexual sensitiveness" and "Sexual ability" with gender-specific questions. Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged from 0.48 to 0.86 and test-retest values for all but one question exceeded 0.70.
The Swedish version of the WSFQ showed good validity and stability and acceptable internal homogeneity. Extended evaluations of the questionnaire are recommended.
PubMed ID
20071238 View in PubMed
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Factors related to work ability and well-being among women on sick leave due to long-term pain in the neck/shoulders and/or back: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301618
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 30; 18(1):672
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-30-2018
Author
Mamunur Rashid
Marja-Leena Kristofferzon
Marina Heiden
Annika Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, SE-80176, Gävle, Sweden. mamunur.rashid@hig.se.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 30; 18(1):672
Date
05-30-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Back Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Chronic Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Pain Measurement
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Self Efficacy
Shoulder Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Women - psychology
Work - psychology
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
Musculoskeletal pain is one of the leading causes of sick leave, especially among women, in Western countries. The aim of the present study was to identify factors associated with work ability and well-being, respectively, among women on sick leave due to long-term pain in the neck/shoulders and/or back.
A cross-sectional study with a correlational design was conducted on women who were sick-listed due to long-term pain in the neck/shoulders and/or back. A total of 208 participants responded to a survey comprising eight instruments: Multidimensional Pain Inventory scale, General Self-Efficacy scale, Sense of Coherence scale, Coping Strategies Questionnaire, Demand-Control-Support Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Work Ability Index and Life Satisfaction questionnaire. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with work ability and well-being, respectively.
Women who more strongly believed they would return to the same work had greater work ability (ß?=?0.39, p?
PubMed ID
29848306 View in PubMed
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Health-related quality of life improves during the first six months after cardiac arrest and hypothermia treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257632
Source
Resuscitation. 2014 Feb;85(2):215-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Ing-Marie Larsson
Ewa Wallin
Sten Rubertsson
Marja-Leena Kristofferzon
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences - Anaesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: ing-marie.larsson@surgsci.uu.se.
Source
Resuscitation. 2014 Feb;85(2):215-20
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - psychology
Depression - psychology
Female
Health status
Heart Arrest - psychology - therapy
Humans
Hypothermia, Induced
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Survival Rate
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate whether there were any changes in and correlations between anxiety, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) over time, between hospital discharge and one and six months after cardiac arrest (CA), in patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia (TH).
During a 4-year period at three hospitals in Sweden, 26 patients were prospectively included after CA treated with TH. All patients completed the questionnaires Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Euroqol (EQ5D), Euroqol visual analogue scale (EQ-VAS) and Short Form 12 (SF12) at three occasions, at hospital discharge, and at one and 6 months after CA.
There was improvement over time in HRQoL, the EQ5D index (p=0.002) and the SF12 physical component score (PCS) (p=0.005). Changes over time in anxiety and depression were not found. Seventy-three percent of patients had an EQ-VAS score below 70 (scale 0-100) on overall health status at discharge from hospital; at 6 months the corresponding figure was 41%. Physical problems were the most common complaint affecting HRQoL. A correlation was found between depression and HRQoL, and this was strongest at six months (rs=-0.44 to -0.71, p=0.001).
HRQoL improves over the first 6 months after a CA. Patients reported lower levels of HRQoL on the physical as compared to mental component. The results indicate that the less anxiety and depression patients perceive, the better HRQoL they have and that time can be an important factor in recovery after CA.
Notes
Comment In: Resuscitation. 2014 Feb;85(2):157-824291509
PubMed ID
24096198 View in PubMed
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Life memories and the ability to act: the meaning of autonomy and participation for older people when living with chronic illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280478
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Dec;29(4):824-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Maria Hedman
Ulrika Pöder
Anna-Greta Mamhidir
Annika Nilsson
Marja-Leena Kristofferzon
Elisabeth Häggström
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Dec;29(4):824-33
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - psychology
Decision Making
Female
Humans
Male
Memory, Episodic
Patient Participation - psychology
Personal Autonomy
Self Care - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
There is a lack of knowledge about how older people living with chronic illness describe the meaning of autonomy and participation, indicating a risk for reduced autonomy and participation in their everyday life. The purpose of this study was to describe the meaning of autonomy and participation among older people living with chronic illness in accordance with their lived experience. The design was descriptive with a phenomenological approach guided by Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological psychological method. Purposive sampling was used, and 16 older people living with chronic illness who lived in an ordinary home participated in individual interviews. The findings showed that the meaning of autonomy and participation among the older people emerged when it was challenged and evoked emotional considerations of the lived experience of having a chronic illness. It involved living a life apart, yet still being someone who is able, trustworthy and given responsibility--still being seen and acknowledged. The meaning of autonomy and participation was derived through life memories and used by the older people in everyday life for adjustment or adaption to the present life and the future. Our conclusion is that autonomy and participation were considered in relation to older people's life memories in the past, in their present situation and also their future wishes. Ability or disability is of less importance than the meaning of everyday life among older people. We suggest using fewer labels for limitations in everyday life when caring for older people and more use of the phrase 'ability to act' in different ways, based on older people's descriptions of the meaning of autonomy and participation.
PubMed ID
25856656 View in PubMed
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Motivational interviewing: experiences of primary care nurses trained in the method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266501
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2015 Mar;15(2):111-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Ann-Sofi Östlund
Barbro Wadensten
Marja-Leena Kristofferzon
Elisabeth Häggström
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2015 Mar;15(2):111-8
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Motivational Interviewing - methods
Primary Care Nursing
Sweden
Abstract
Motivational interviewing is a person-centered counseling style used to promote behavioral change regarding a wide variety of lifestyle problems. Use of motivational interview is growing worldwide and among many different healthcare professions, including primary care nursing. The study aim was to describe motivational interview trained nurses' experiences of motivational interviewing in primary care settings. The study had a qualitative descriptive design. It was carried out in Swedish primary care settings in two county council districts, with 20 primary care nurses trained in motivational interviewing. Half of them used the method in their work, half did not. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were used. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The nurses experienced that openness to the approach and an encouraging working climate are required to overcome internal resistance and to increase use of motivational interviewing. They also experienced mutual benefit: motivational interviewing elicits and develops abilities in both nurses and patients. For the nurses using it, motivational interviewing is perceived to facilitate work with patients in need of lifestyle change. Lack of training/education, support, interest and appropriate work tasks/patients are reasons for not using motivational interviewing.
PubMed ID
25432584 View in PubMed
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Nursing preceptors' experiences of two clinical education models.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263484
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2014 Aug;14(4):427-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Anna-Greta Mamhidir
Marja-Leena Kristofferzon
Eva Hellström-Hyson
Elisabeth Persson
Gunilla Mårtensson
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2014 Aug;14(4):427-33
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Female
Hospitals, Public - organization & administration
Hospitals, Teaching - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Mentors - psychology
Middle Aged
Models, Educational
Models, Nursing
Models, organizational
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Peer Group
Preceptorship - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Students, Nursing - psychology
Sweden
Teaching - methods
Abstract
Preceptors play an important role in the process of developing students' knowledge and skills. There is an ongoing search for the best learning and teaching models in clinical education. Little is known about preceptors' perspectives on different models. The aim of the study was to describe nursing preceptors' experiences of two clinical models of clinical education: peer learning and traditional supervision. A descriptive design and qualitative approach was used. Eighteen preceptors from surgical and medical departments at two hospitals were interviewed, ten representing peer learning (student work in pairs) and eight traditional supervision (one student follows a nurse during a shift). The findings showed that preceptors using peer learning created room for students to assume responsibility for their own learning, challenged students' knowledge by refraining from stepping in and encouraged critical thinking. Using traditional supervision, the preceptors' individual ambitions influenced the preceptorship and their own knowledge was empathized as being important to impart. They demonstrated, observed and gradually relinquished responsibility to the students. The choice of clinical education model is important. Peer learning seemed to create learning environments that integrate clinical and academic skills. Investigation of pedagogical models in clinical education should be of major concern to managers and preceptors.
PubMed ID
24512652 View in PubMed
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Nursing student's expectations for their future profession and motivating factors - A longitudinal descriptive study from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308285
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2020 Jan; 84:104218
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2020
Author
Maria Lindberg
Marianne Carlsson
Maria Engström
Marja-Leena Kristofferzon
Bernice Skytt
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 564, SE 751 22 Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: maria.lindberg@regiongavleborg.se.
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2020 Jan; 84:104218
Date
Jan-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Career Choice
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Qualitative Research
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The shortage of registered nurses is a global concern. Motives to become registered nurses can be to help others, altruism, personal development and career security. Motives in combination with student expectations regarding the role are not explored.
To describe students' motives to become registered nurses and their expectations regarding their future profession.
A longitudinal descriptive design with a qualitative approach was used to follow nursing students in the beginning, during and at the end of their education.
A purposive sampling of a group with initially 75 students starting a three-year nursing program at a university in Sweden.
A study specific questionnaire with open-ended questions was used in the beginning, during and the end of the students' education. At data collection two and three, a copy of the earlier answers was attached. Data were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis.
An important profession with career opportunities, interesting duties and team work were described. Students expected diversified duties, possibilities for development and work satisfaction. Increased concerns regarding their upcoming work life was described at the end of the education.
The students had a positive understanding of the profession and perceived their forthcoming role as interesting. The leading role of coordinating patient care was more comprehensive than expected. Supportive conditions and well planned transition periods could strengthen newly graduated nurses in their professional role and could be an important aspect in the future retention of RNs.
PubMed ID
31698292 View in PubMed
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Nursing students' perceptions of clinical supervision: the contributions of preceptors, head preceptors and clinical lecturers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266809
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2013 Oct;33(10):1252-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Marja-Leena Kristofferzon
Gunilla Mårtensson
Anna-Greta Mamhidir
Anna Löfmark
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2013 Oct;33(10):1252-7
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Faculty, Nursing
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Preceptorship
Questionnaires
Students, Nursing - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The aims of the study were 1) to investigate to what extent nursing students were satisfied with the supervision provided by facilitators (preceptor, head preceptor, and clinical lecturer), 2) to compare nursing students' ratings of facilitators' contribution to supervision as supportive and challenging, and 3) to examine relationships between facilitators' supportive and challenging behavior in supervision and nursing students' perception of fulfillment of expected learning outcomes in clinical education.
Although there are many studies on support of students in clinical education, few have addressed this from the students' point of view or made comparisons between different facilitators.
A cross-sectional survey study was conducted during April to November 2010, where 107 nursing students, from a university in central Sweden, answered a questionnaire about supervision immediately after their period of clinical education.
Supportive behavior in supervision was rated higher by students for all facilitator groups as compared with challenging behavior. The students rated preceptors and clinical lecturers as more supportive than head preceptors and clinical lecturers as providing more challenges than the two other facilitator groups. Supportive and challenging behavior in supervision explained 39% of the variance in students' overall learning outcomes. However, the regression coefficient was only significant for students' ratings of supportive behavior for the preceptor.
Nursing students were satisfied with facilitators' supervision and by their contribution to fulfillment of overall learning outcomes. Comparisons showed that preceptors in a higher degree were perceived as supportive while clinical lecturers were perceived as more important as challengers for critical thinking, reflection and exchange of experiences between students. The model of supervision seems to be promising, but the roles across facilitators need to be made clearer, especially the head preceptor's role, which seemed to be the most unclear role in this model.
PubMed ID
22995594 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.