Skip header and navigation

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Data set on sedimentology, palaeoecology and chronology of middle to late pleistocene deposits on the Taimyr Peninsula, Arctic Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302478
Source
Data Brief. 2019 Aug; 25:104267
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2019
Author
Per Möller
Ívar Örn Benediktsson
Johanna Anjar
Ole Bennike
Martin Bernhardson
Svend Funder
Lena M Håkansson
Geoffrey Lemdahl
Joseph M Licciardi
Andrew S Murray
Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz
Author Affiliation
Department of Geology, Quaternary Sciences, Lund University, Sölvegatan 12, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Data Brief. 2019 Aug; 25:104267
Date
Aug-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
This Data in Brief paper contains data (including images) from Quaternary sedimentary successions investigated along the Bol'shaya Balakhnya River and the Luktakh-Upper Taimyra-Logata river system on southern Taimyr Peninsula, NW Siberia (Russia). Marine foraminifera and mollusc fauna composition, extracted from sediment samples, is presented. The chronology (time of deposition) of the sediment successions is reconstructed from three dating methods; (i) radiocarbon dating of organic detritus (from lacustrine/fluvial sediment) and molluscs (marine sediment) as finite ages (usually 42 000-48 000 years) on samples/sediments beyond the radiocarbon dating limit; (ii) Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) dating on marine molluscs (up to ages >400 000 years); (iii) Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating, usually effective up to 100-150 0000 years. Terrestrial Cosmogenic Nuclide (TCN) exposure dating has been applied to boulders resting on top of moraine ridges (Ice Marginal Zones). See (Möller et al., 2019) (doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2019.04.004) for interpretation and discussion of all data.
PubMed ID
31388521 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evidence for influx of Atlantic water masses to the Labrador Sea during the Last Glacial Maximum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311089
Source
Sci Rep. 2021 Mar 24; 11(1):6788
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-24-2021
Author
Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz
Antoon Kuijpers
Steffen Aagaard-Sørensen
Holger Lindgreen
Jesper Olsen
Christof Pearce
Author Affiliation
Paleoceanography and Paleoclimate Group, Arctic Research Centre, and iCLIMATE Aarhus University Interdisciplinary Centre for Climate Change, Department for Geoscience, Aarhus University, Høegh-Guldbergs Gade 2, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark. mss@geo.au.dk.
Source
Sci Rep. 2021 Mar 24; 11(1):6788
Date
Mar-24-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 23-19,000 year BP) designates a period of extensive glacial extent and very cold conditions on the Northern Hemisphere. The strength of ocean circulation during this period has been highly debated. Based on investigations of two marine sediment cores from the Davis Strait (1033 m water depth) and the northern Labrador Sea (2381 m), we demonstrate a significant influx of Atlantic-sourced water at both subsurface and intermediate depths during the LGM. Although surface-water conditions were cold and sea-ice loaded, the lower strata of the (proto) West Greenland Current carried a significant Atlantic (Irminger Sea-derived) Water signal, while at the deeper site the sea floor was swept by a water mass comparable with present Northeast Atlantic Deep Water. The persistent influx of these Atlantic-sourced waters entrained by boundary currents off SW Greenland demonstrates an active Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation during the LGM. Immediately after the LGM, deglaciation was characterized by a prominent deep-water ventilation event and potentially Labrador Sea Water formation, presumably related to brine formation and/or hyperpycnal meltwater flows. This was followed by a major re-arrangement of deep-water masses most likely linked to increased overflow at the Greenland-Scotland Ridge after ca 15 kyr BP.
PubMed ID
33762677 View in PubMed
Less detail

Formate, acetate, and propionate as substrates for sulfate reduction in sub-arctic sediments of Southwest Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266145
Source
Front Microbiol. 2015;6:846
Publication Type
Article
Author
Clemens Glombitza
Marion Jaussi
Hans Røy
Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz
Bente A Lomstein
Bo B Jørgensen
Source
Front Microbiol. 2015;6:846
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are key intermediates in the anaerobic mineralization of organic matter in marine sediments. We studied the role of VFAs in the carbon and energy turnover in the sulfate reduction zone of sediments from the sub-arctic Godth?bsfjord (SW Greenland) and the adjacent continental shelf in the NE Labrador Sea. VFA porewater concentrations were measured by a new two-dimensional ion chromatography-mass spectrometry method that enabled the direct analysis of VFAs without sample pretreatment. VFA concentrations were low and surprisingly constant (4-6 ?mol L(-1) for formate and acetate, and 0.5 ?mol L(-1) for propionate) throughout the sulfate reduction zone. Hence, VFAs are turned over while maintaining a stable concentration that is suggested to be under a strong microbial control. Estimated mean diffusion times of acetate between neighboring cells were
PubMed ID
26379631 View in PubMed
Less detail

Glacial Runoff Promotes Deep Burial of Sulfur Cycling-Associated Microorganisms in Marine Sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307917
Source
Front Microbiol. 2019; 10:2558
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2019
Author
Claus Pelikan
Marion Jaussi
Kenneth Wasmund
Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz
Christof Pearce
Zou Zou Anna Kuzyk
Craig W Herbold
Hans Røy
Kasper Urup Kjeldsen
Alexander Loy
Author Affiliation
Division of Microbial Ecology, Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
Source
Front Microbiol. 2019; 10:2558
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Marine fjords with active glacier outlets are hot spots for organic matter burial in the sediments and subsequent microbial mineralization. Here, we investigated controls on microbial community assembly in sub-arctic glacier-influenced (GI) and non-glacier-influenced (NGI) marine sediments in the Godthåbsfjord region, south-western Greenland. We used a correlative approach integrating 16S rRNA gene and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrB) amplicon sequence data over six meters of depth with biogeochemistry, sulfur-cycling activities, and sediment ages. GI sediments were characterized by comparably high sedimentation rates and had "young" sediment ages of
PubMed ID
31787951 View in PubMed
Less detail

Learning from the past: Impact of the Arctic Oscillation on sea ice and marine productivity off northwest Greenland over the last 9,000 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304820
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2020 Dec; 26(12):6767-6786
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2020
Author
Audrey Limoges
Kaarina Weckström
Sofia Ribeiro
Eleanor Georgiadis
Katrine E Hansen
Philippe Martinez
Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz
Jacques Giraudeau
Xavier Crosta
Guillaume Massé
Author Affiliation
Department of Earth Sciences, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, Canada.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2020 Dec; 26(12):6767-6786
Date
Dec-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Climate warming is rapidly reshaping the Arctic cryosphere and ocean conditions, with consequences for sea ice and pelagic productivity patterns affecting the entire marine food web. To predict how ongoing changes will impact Arctic marine ecosystems, concerted effort from various disciplines is required. Here, we contribute multi-decadal reconstructions of changes in diatom production and sea-ice conditions in relation to Holocene climate and ocean conditions off northwest Greenland. Our multiproxy study includes diatoms, sea-ice biomarkers (IP25 and HBI III) and geochemical tracers (TOC [total organic carbon], TOC:TN [total nitrogen], d13 C, d15 N) from a sediment core record spanning the last c. 9,000 years. Our results suggest that the balance between the outflow of polar water from the Arctic, and input of Atlantic water from the Irminger Current into the West Greenland Current is a key factor in controlling sea-ice conditions, and both diatom phenology and production in northeastern Baffin Bay. Our proxy record notably shows that changes in sea-surface conditions initially forced by Neoglacial cooling were dynamically amplified by the shift in the dominant phase of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) mode that occurred at c. 3,000 yr BP, and caused drastic changes in community composition and a decline in diatom production at the study site. In the future, with projected dominant-positive AO conditions favored by Arctic warming, increased water column stratification may counteract the positive effect of a longer open-water growth season and negatively impact diatom production.
PubMed ID
32885894 View in PubMed
Less detail

Learning from the past: Impact of the Arctic Oscillation on sea ice and marine productivity off northwest Greenland over the last 9,000 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311556
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2020 Dec; 26(12):6767-6786
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2020
Author
Audrey Limoges
Kaarina Weckström
Sofia Ribeiro
Eleanor Georgiadis
Katrine E Hansen
Philippe Martinez
Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz
Jacques Giraudeau
Xavier Crosta
Guillaume Massé
Author Affiliation
Department of Earth Sciences, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, Canada.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2020 Dec; 26(12):6767-6786
Date
Dec-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Ecosystem
Food chain
Greenland
Ice Cover
Abstract
Climate warming is rapidly reshaping the Arctic cryosphere and ocean conditions, with consequences for sea ice and pelagic productivity patterns affecting the entire marine food web. To predict how ongoing changes will impact Arctic marine ecosystems, concerted effort from various disciplines is required. Here, we contribute multi-decadal reconstructions of changes in diatom production and sea-ice conditions in relation to Holocene climate and ocean conditions off northwest Greenland. Our multiproxy study includes diatoms, sea-ice biomarkers (IP25 and HBI III) and geochemical tracers (TOC [total organic carbon], TOC:TN [total nitrogen], d13 C, d15 N) from a sediment core record spanning the last c. 9,000 years. Our results suggest that the balance between the outflow of polar water from the Arctic, and input of Atlantic water from the Irminger Current into the West Greenland Current is a key factor in controlling sea-ice conditions, and both diatom phenology and production in northeastern Baffin Bay. Our proxy record notably shows that changes in sea-surface conditions initially forced by Neoglacial cooling were dynamically amplified by the shift in the dominant phase of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) mode that occurred at c. 3,000 yr BP, and caused drastic changes in community composition and a decline in diatom production at the study site. In the future, with projected dominant-positive AO conditions favored by Arctic warming, increased water column stratification may counteract the positive effect of a longer open-water growth season and negatively impact diatom production.
PubMed ID
32885894 View in PubMed
Less detail

The role of sea ice for vascular plant dispersal in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276252
Source
Biol Lett. 2016 Sep;12(9)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Inger Greve Alsos
Dorothee Ehrich
Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz
Ole Bennike
Andreas Joachim Kirchhefer
Aslaug Geirsdottir
Source
Biol Lett. 2016 Sep;12(9)
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Sea ice has been suggested to be an important factor for dispersal of vascular plants in the Arctic. To assess its role for postglacial colonization in the North Atlantic region, we compiled data on the first Late Glacial to Holocene occurrence of vascular plant species in East Greenland, Iceland, the Faroe Islands and Svalbard. For each record, we reconstructed likely past dispersal events using data on species distributions and genetics. We compared these data to sea-ice reconstructions to evaluate the potential role of sea ice in these past colonization events and finally evaluated these results using a compilation of driftwood records as an independent source of evidence that sea ice can disperse biological material. Our results show that sea ice was, in general, more prevalent along the most likely dispersal routes at times of assumed first colonization than along other possible routes. Also, driftwood is frequently dispersed in regions that have sea ice today. Thus, sea ice may act as an important dispersal agent. Melting sea ice may hamper future dispersal of Arctic plants and thereby cause more genetic differentiation. It may also limit the northwards expansion of competing boreal species, and hence favour the persistence of Arctic species.
PubMed ID
27651529 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sea ice and primary production proxies in surface sediments from a High Arctic Greenland fjord: Spatial distribution and implications for palaeoenvironmental studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279550
Source
Ambio. 2017 Feb;46(Suppl 1):106-118
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Sofia Ribeiro
Mikael K Sejr
Audrey Limoges
Maija Heikkilä
Thorbjørn Joest Andersen
Petra Tallberg
Kaarina Weckström
Katrine Husum
Matthias Forwick
Tage Dalsgaard
Guillaume Massé
Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz
Søren Rysgaard
Source
Ambio. 2017 Feb;46(Suppl 1):106-118
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In order to establish a baseline for proxy-based reconstructions for the Young Sound-Tyrolerfjord system (Northeast Greenland), we analysed the spatial distribution of primary production and sea ice proxies in surface sediments from the fjord, against monitoring data from the Greenland Ecosystem Monitoring Programme. Clear spatial gradients in organic carbon and biogenic silica contents reflected marine influence, nutrient availability and river-induced turbidity, in good agreement with in situ measurements. The sea ice proxy IP25 was detected at all sites but at low concentrations, indicating that IP25 records from fjords need to be carefully considered and not directly compared to marine settings. The sea ice-associated biomarker HBI III revealed an open-water signature, with highest concentrations near the mid-July ice edge. This proxy evaluation is an important step towards reliable palaeoenvironmental reconstructions that will, ultimately, contribute to better predictions for this High Arctic ecosystem in a warming climate.
PubMed ID
28116686 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.