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Behavioural and emotional symptoms of preschool children with cerebral palsy: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96852
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2010 May 24;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-24-2010
Author
Solveig Sigurdardottir
Marit S Indredavik
Auður Eiriksdottir
Katrín Einarsdottir
Halldór S Gudmundsson
Torstein Vik
Author Affiliation
State Diagnostic and Counselling Centre, Kopavogur, Iceland.
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2010 May 24;
Date
May-24-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Aim To describe behavioural and emotional symptoms among Icelandic preschool children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method Children with congenital CP, assessed with the Child Behavior Checklist/1(1/2)-5 (CBCL/1(1/2)-5) and Caregiver-Teacher Report Form (C-TRF), were enrolled in the study. A comparison group was recruited from the general population. Thirty-six children (53% males) with CP were assessed at a mean age of 4 years 11 months (SD 5mo, range 4-6y); 26 (72%) had bilateral distribution of symptoms and 32 (89%) had spastic CP. Thirty (83%) were at Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I or II and six at levels III or IV. For comparison, 110 (43% males) and 120 (48% males) children were assessed with the CBCL/1(1/2)-5 and the C-TRF respectively, at a mean age of 4 years 6 months (SD 6mo, range 4-6y). Results Sixteen children (48%) with CP had high scores on total problems scale of the CBCL/1(1/2)-5 and 20 (65%) on the C-TRF compared with 18% of the comparison group, both on the CBCL/1(1/2)-5 and the C-TRF (p
PubMed ID
20497458 View in PubMed
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Chronic multisite pain in adolescent girls and boys with emotional and behavioral problems: the Young-HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267820
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2015 May;24(5):503-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Marit Skrove
Pål Romundstad
Marit S Indredavik
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2015 May;24(5):503-15
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Analgesics - administration & dosage
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - etiology
Chronic Pain - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology - etiology
Emotions
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Phobic Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Resilience, Psychological
Self Concept
Social Behavior
Social Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of chronic multisite pain with high disability in relation to emotional or behavioral problems and resilience factors in adolescence. A second aim was to investigate if resilience factors could attenuate the associations between psychiatric symptoms and chronic multisite pain. The study was based on a large cross-sectional study carried out in Norway between 2006 and 2008 and included 7,070 adolescents aged 13-19 years. Chronic multisite pain was defined as pain at least once a week during the last 3 months, scoring high on a disability index, and occurring in three or more locations. Chronic multisite pain was prevalent among adolescents with high scores (>85%) for anxiety/depression, social anxiety, conduct or attention problems (22.8-31.0 for girls, 8.8-19.0% for boys). Several coexistent psychiatric symptoms increased the prevalence of chronic multisite pain for both girls and boys. Resilience factors, including high self-esteem, seldom feeling lonely, and high scores for family cohesion or social competence, were associated with a lower prevalence and markedly attenuated the association between psychiatric symptoms and chronic multisite pain. Psychiatrists should be careful to assess and treat comorbid chronic pain in adolescents with emotional or behavioral problems.
PubMed ID
25138145 View in PubMed
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Chronic pain and pain-related disability across psychiatric disorders in a clinical adolescent sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259536
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:272
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Wenche L Mangerud
Ottar Bjerkeset
Stian Lydersen
Marit S Indredavik
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:272
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Chronic Pain - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Disability Evaluation
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Norway
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Abstract
People who suffer from psychiatric disorders are burdened with a high prevalence of chronic illnesses and pain, but evidence on pain prevalence among adolescents with psychiatric disorders is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and location of self-reported chronic pain and pain-related disability in adolescent psychiatric patients.
This study was part of the larger Health Survey administered at the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) at St. Olav's University Hospital, in Trondheim, Norway. All patients aged 13-18 years who visited the CAP clinic at least once between February 15, 2009 and February 15, 2011 were invited to participate. A total of 717 (43.5% of eligible/invited patients) participated; of these, 566 were diagnosed with one or more psychiatric disorders. The adolescents completed a questionnaire, which included questions about pain and pain-related disability. Clinical diagnoses were classified by a clinician according to International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th revision criteria.
In adolescents with psychiatric disorders, 70.4% reported chronic pain, and 37.3% experienced chronic pain in three or more locations (multisite pain). Chronic musculoskeletal pain was the most prevalent type of pain (57.7%). Pain-related disability was found in 22.2% of the sample. The frequency of chronic pain and multisite pain increased with age, and girls reported a higher frequency of chronic pain, multisite pain and pain-related disability than boys did. There was an increased risk of chronic pain among adolescents with mood or anxiety disorders versus those with hyperkinetic disorders, yet this was not present after adjusting for sex. Comorbidity between hyperkinetic and mood or anxiety disorders involved an increased risk of pain-related disability.
In this study, seven out of 10 adolescents with psychiatric disorders reported chronic pain. These findings indicate the importance of early detection of chronic pain in adolescents with psychiatric disorders, to provide targeted treatment and reduce poor long-term outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24139217 View in PubMed
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Developmental course of anxiety and depression from adolescence to young adulthood in a prospective Norwegian clinical cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296643
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2018 Nov; 27(11):1413-1423
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Ingunn Ranøyen
Stian Lydersen
Tricia L Larose
Bernhard Weidle
Norbert Skokauskas
Per Hove Thomsen
Jan Wallander
Marit S Indredavik
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Department of Mental Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. ingunn.ranoyen@ntnu.no.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2018 Nov; 27(11):1413-1423
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Comorbidity
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Phobic Disorders - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Anxiety and depression are often co-occurring disorders, reflecting both homotypic and heterotypic continuity as possible developmental pathways. The present study aimed to examine homotypic and heterotypic continuities of anxiety and depression across 3 years in adolescence and young adulthood. Participants included patients presenting to psychiatric care with diagnoses of anxiety and/or depressive disorders aged 13-18 at T1 (N = 717, 44% initial participation rate) and aged 16-21 at T2 (N = 549, 80% follow-up participation rate). McNemar's mid-p test and ordinal proportional odds logistic regression analyses were used to assess changes in prevalence within and across diagnostic categories, respectively. More adolescents had an anxiety disorder (+ 11%), whereas fewer had a depressive disorder (- 11%), at T2 compared to T1. Of adolescents with anxiety and/or depression at T1, only 25% recovered or were non-symptomatic 3 years after referral to a psychiatric clinic. Homotypic continuity was observed for anxiety disorders in general (OR = 2.33), for phobic anxiety disorders (OR = 7.45), and for depressive disorders (OR = 2.15). For heterotypic continuity, depression predicted later anxiety (OR = 1.92), more specifically social anxiety (OR = 2.14) and phobic anxiety disorders (OR = 1.83). In addition, social anxiety predicted later generalized anxiety disorder (OR = 3.11). Heterotypic continuity was thus more common than homotypic continuity. For adolescents presenting with anxiety or depression, treatment should, therefore, target broad internalizing symptom clusters, rather than individual diagnoses. This may contribute to prevent future mental illness, particularly anxiety, in clinical samples.
PubMed ID
29502316 View in PubMed
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Gender differences in psychosocial functioning of adolescents with symptoms of anxiety and depression: longitudinal findings from the Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126530
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;47(11):1855-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Ruth Derdikman-Eiron
Marit S Indredavik
Inger Johanne Bakken
Grete H Bratberg
Odin Hjemdal
Matthew Colton
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, The Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (RBUP), Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491, Trondheim, Norway. ruth.derdikman@ntnu.no
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;47(11):1855-63
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Personality Tests - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Sex Characteristics
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Abstract
To explore longitudinally gender differences in the associations between psychosocial functioning, subjective well-being and self-esteem among adolescents with and without symptoms of anxiety and depression.
Data were obtained from a major population-based Norwegian study, the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, in which 1,092 boys and 1,262 girls (86% of all invited) completed an extensive self-report questionnaire at baseline (mean age 14.4 years) and at follow-up (mean age 18.4 years).
Gender was a moderator variable in the associations between symptoms of anxiety and depression and impairment, meaning that boys' functioning was impaired to a larger extent than girls' functioning. A statistically significant interaction effect between gender and symptoms of anxiety and depression was found at follow-up in terms of subjective well-being (p
PubMed ID
22382555 View in PubMed
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Gender differences in subjective well-being, self-esteem and psychosocial functioning in adolescents with symptoms of anxiety and depression: findings from the Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137630
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2011 Jun;52(3):261-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Ruth Derdikman-Eiron
Marit S Indredavik
Grete H Bratberg
Gunnar Taraldsen
Inger Johanne Bakken
Matthew Colton
Author Affiliation
The Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. derdikman@ntnu.no
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2011 Jun;52(3):261-7
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Checklist
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Norway
Personality Tests - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Abstract
Gender differences in the prevalence of symptoms of anxiety and depression during adolescence are well documented. However, little attention has been given to differences in subjective well-being, self-esteem and psychosocial functioning between boys and girls with symptoms of anxiety and depression. The aim of this study was to investigate gender differences in the associations between such symptoms and subjective well-being, self-esteem, school functioning and social relations in adolescents. Data were taken from a major population-based Norwegian study, the Nord-Trøndelag Health study (HUNT), in which 8984 (91% of all invited) adolescents, aged 13-19 years, completed an extensive self-report questionnaire. Although prevalence rates of symptoms of anxiety and depression were higher in girls than in boys, a significant interaction between gender and symptoms of anxiety and depression was found in respect of each of the following outcome variables: subjective well-being, self-esteem, academic problems, frequency of meeting friends and the feeling of not having enough friends. These interactions indicate that the associations between symptoms of anxiety and depression and lower subjective well-being and self-esteem, more academic problems in school and lower social functioning were stronger for boys than for girls. Our findings may contribute to an earlier assessment and more efficient treatment of male adolescent anxiety and depression.
PubMed ID
21265857 View in PubMed
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Is there an association between full IQ score and mental health problems in young adults? A study with a convenience sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307110
Source
BMC Psychol. 2020 Jan 30; 8(1):7
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-30-2020
Author
Linde Melby
Marit S Indredavik
Gro Løhaugen
Ann Mari Brubakk
Jon Skranes
Torstein Vik
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 6630, Tingvoll, Norway. lindemelby@gmail.com.
Source
BMC Psychol. 2020 Jan 30; 8(1):7
Date
Jan-30-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence
Intelligence Tests
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental disorders
Mental health
Norway
Parents - psychology
Psychological Tests
Young Adult
Abstract
Intelligence is the aggregate or global capacity of the individual to act purposefully, to think rationally and to deal effectively with the environment. Previous studies have shown that individuals with intellectual disability, IQ?
PubMed ID
32000845 View in PubMed
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Low birth weight and psychiatric morbidity; stability and change between adolescence and young adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127087
Source
Early Hum Dev. 2012 Aug;88(8):623-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Line K Lund
Torstein Vik
Jon Skranes
Stian Lydersen
Ann-Mari Brubakk
Marit S Indredavik
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. line.k.lund@ntnu.no
Source
Early Hum Dev. 2012 Aug;88(8):623-9
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth weight
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Morbidity
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Being born with low birth weight is a risk factor for psychiatric morbidity. Few longitudinal studies have included diagnostic assessment and followed subjects into adulthood.
To assess stability and change in psychiatric morbidity between adolescence and young adulthood in low birth weight subjects, and explore whether screening in adolescence can predict subsequent psychopathology in these groups.
Prospective geographically based follow-up study of two low birth weight groups and a control group born between 1986 and 1988, assessed at 14 (T1) and 20 (T2) years of age.
Thirty eight subjects born preterm with very low birth weight (VLBW: =1500g), 43 born at term but small for gestational age (SGA:
PubMed ID
22325843 View in PubMed
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Mental health, quality of life and social relations in young adults born with low birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118369
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2012;10:146
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Line K Lund
Torstein Vik
Stian Lydersen
Gro C C Løhaugen
Jon Skranes
Ann-Mari Brubakk
Marit S Indredavik
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. line.k.lund@ntnu.no
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2012;10:146
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight - psychology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - psychology
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental health
Norway - epidemiology
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Being born with low birth weight may have an impact on different aspects of mental health, psychosocial functioning and well-being; however results from studies in young adulthood have so far yielded mixed findings. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term impact in young adulthood on self-reported mental health, health-related quality of life, self-esteem and social relations by investigating differences between two low birth weight groups and a control group.
In a follow-up at 20 years of age, 43 preterm VLBW (birth weight = 1500 g), 55 term SGA (birth weight
Notes
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PubMed ID
23216805 View in PubMed
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Professional collaboration - support for children with cancer and their families - focus group interview - a source of information and knowledge - professionals' perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100692
Source
J Interprof Care. 2009 Jul;23(4):355-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Mary-Elizabeth Bradley Eilertsen
Kristjana Kristiansen
Trude Reinfjell
Toril Rannestad
Marit S Indredavik
Torstein Vik
Author Affiliation
Sør-Trøndelag University College, Faculty of Nursing, Trondheim, Norway. mary.elizabeth.eilertsen@hist.no
Source
J Interprof Care. 2009 Jul;23(4):355-68
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Focus Groups
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Neoplasms
Norway
Oncologic Nursing
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Patient Education as Topic
Pediatric Nursing
Pediatrics - organization & administration
Pilot Projects
Professional-Family Relations
Social Support
Abstract
In this study, our aims were to evaluate a professional collaborative model and to explore professionals' perceptions of collaboration generally. Focus group interviews were performed with 18 health and non-health professionals caring for children diagnosed and treated for cancer. Collaboration was considered significant for professionals themselves and the families they work with. Focus group participants support the importance of arranging collaborative meetings at an early stage of the child's illness and the family's crisis. Many professionals, working in the child's home community, were alone with the responsibility for follow-up care, but only a few of these professionals received supervision. More frequent contact with the paediatric clinic was desired, as well as a more active role for the general practitioner. Professionals perceived the model as being a valuable support system for longterm planning of follow-up care, allowing parents to collaborate with the care team. It is essential however, to emphasize the importance of having well-established routines, as well as the use of a coordinator. This can be important for enhancing communication between professionals and for obtaining a well-functioning collaboration.
PubMed ID
19370468 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.