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Beyond Health Equity: Achieving Wellness Within American Indian and Alaska Native Communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262021
Source
Am J Public Health. 2015 Apr 23;:e1-e4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-23-2015
Author
Valarie Blue Bird Jernigan
Michael Peercy
Dannielle Branam
Bobby Saunkeah
David Wharton
Marilyn Winkleby
John Lowe
Alicia L Salvatore
Daniel Dickerson
Annie Belcourt
Elizabeth D'Amico
Christi A Patten
Myra Parker
Bonnie Duran
Raymond Harris
Dedra Buchwald
Source
Am J Public Health. 2015 Apr 23;:e1-e4
Date
Apr-23-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Indigenous peoples across the globe have higher morbidity and mortality rates than their non-Indigenous counterparts.(1) The nine-year gap in life expectancy between New Zealand's Indigenous Maori population and other New Zealanders has led to sweeping primary care reforms to improve health and reduce disparities.(2,3) The seven-year gap between Canada's First Nations, Metis, and Inuit populations and other Canadians led to the dedication of one of the 13 Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Institute of Aboriginal Peoples' Health, solely to improving the health of Canada's Indigenous peoples.(4) (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print April 23, 2015: e1-e4. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2014.302447).
PubMed ID
25905823 View in PubMed
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Differences in neighborhood accessibility to health-related resources: a nationwide comparison between deprived and affluent neighborhoods in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139937
Source
Health Place. 2011 Jan;17(1):132-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Naomi Kawakami
Marilyn Winkleby
Lars Skog
Robert Szulkin
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Center for Family and Community Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Health Place. 2011 Jan;17(1):132-9
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Health Services Accessibility - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
Poverty Areas
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This nationwide Swedish study used geocoded data from all businesses in Sweden to examine the distribution of 12 main categories of goods, services, and resources in 6986 neighborhoods, categorized as low, moderate, and high neighborhood deprivation. The main findings were that high- and moderate-deprivation neighborhoods had a significantly higher prevalence of all types of goods, services, and resources than low-deprivation neighborhoods. These findings do not support previous research that hypothesizes that poorer health among people in deprived neighborhoods is explained by a lack of health-promoting resources, although a higher presence of health-damaging resources may play a role.
PubMed ID
20961797 View in PubMed
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Familial and neighborhood effects on psychiatric disorders in childhood and adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270483
Source
J Psychiatr Res. 2015 Jul-Aug;66-67:7-15
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jan Sundquist
Xinjun Li
Henrik Ohlsson
Maria Råstam
Marilyn Winkleby
Kristina Sundquist
Kenneth S Kendler
Casey Crump
Source
J Psychiatr Res. 2015 Jul-Aug;66-67:7-15
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology
Family
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Individuality
Logistic Models
Mood Disorders - epidemiology
Registries
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
More knowledge is needed on potential associations between individual-, family-, and neighborhood-level factors and psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents.
To examine associations between, individual-, family-, and neighborhood-level factors and incident internalizing (anxiety and mood) disorders and externalizing (ADHD and conduct) disorders in children and adolescents, and to estimate the relative contributions of family and neighborhood to individual variation in these disorders.
We performed a three-level logistic regression on all 542,195 children born in Sweden in 1992-1996, nested in 427,954 families, which in turn were nested in 8475 neighborhoods. The children were followed from 2000 to 2010 for incident internalizing and externalizing psychiatric disorders, assessed from medical records.
26,514 children (4.8%) were diagnosed with internalizing or externalizing psychiatric disorders. Approximately 29% of the total individual variance in internalizing disorders could be attributed to the family level, which includes both genetic and family environmental effects, and 5% to the neighborhood level. The corresponding figures for externalizing disorders were 43.5% and 5.5%, respectively. After adjustment for individual-level sociodemographic factors, high neighborhood deprivation was associated with increased risks of externalizing and internalizing psychiatric disorders (odds ratio [OR] = 1.37, 95% credible interval [CI] = 1.25-1.50 and OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.25-1.45, respectively), including conduct disorder (OR = 2.01, 95% CI = 1.58-2.55), anxiety disorders (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.29-1.52), and mood disorders (OR = 1.21, 95% CI, 1.09-1.35). The strongest association between neighborhood deprivation and ADHD was observed in moderately deprived neighborhoods (OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.19-1.44).
These findings call for policies to promote mental health that consider potential influences from children's family and neighborhood environments.conclusion
Not applicable.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25953099 View in PubMed
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Familial [corrected] transmission of coronary heart disease: a cohort study of 80,214 Swedish adoptees linked to their biological and adoptive parents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132266
Source
Am Heart J. 2011 Aug;162(2):317-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Kristina Sundquist
Marilyn Winkleby
Xinjun Li
Jianguang Ji
Kari Hemminki
Jan Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. Kristina.sundquist@med.lu.se
Source
Am Heart J. 2011 Aug;162(2):317-23
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Parenting
Parents
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Studies of adoptees have the potential to disentangle the contributions of genetic versus family environmental factors in the familial [corrected] transmission of coronary heart disease (CHD) because adoptees do not share the same family environment as their biological parents. The aims of this study were as follows: (1) to examine the risk of CHD in adopted men and women with at least one biological parent with CHD and (2) to examine the risk of CHD in adopted men and women with at least one adoptive parent with CHD.
The Swedish Multigenerational register was used to follow all Swedish-born adoptees (born in or after 1932, n = 80,214) between January 1, 1973, and December 31, 2008, for CHD. The risk of CHD was estimated in adopted men and women with at least one biological parent with CHD and adopted men and women with at least one adoptive parent with CHD. The control groups consisted of adopted men or women without a biological parent with CHD or adopted men or women without an adoptive parent with CHD.
Adopted men and women with at least one biological parent with CHD (n = 749) were 1.4 to 1.6 times (statistically significant, 95% CI) more likely to have CHD than adoptees without a biological parent with CHD. In contrast, men and women with at least one adoptive parent with CHD (n = 1,009) were not at increased risk of the disease.
These findings (based on validated hospital diagnoses unbiased by recall) suggest that the familial [corrected] transmission of CHD from parents to offspring is more related to genetic factors than to family environmental factors.
Notes
Erratum In: Am Heart J. 2012 May;163(5):901
PubMed ID
21835293 View in PubMed
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Mothers, places and small for gestational age births: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99945
Source
Arch Dis Child. 2010 Dec 1;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2010
Author
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Sven-Erik Johansson
Xinjun Li
Marilyn Winkleby
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Arch Dis Child. 2010 Dec 1;
Date
Dec-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Objective This study examines whether neighbourhood deprivation increases the risk of giving birth to a small for gestational age (SGA) infant, after accounting for individual-level maternal socioeconomic characteristics. Design An open cohort of women, aged 20-44 years, was followed from 1 January 1992 through 31 December 2004 for first singleton births. The women's residential addresses during the two consecutive years preceding the birth of their infants were geocoded and classified into three levels of neighbourhood deprivation. Gestational age was confirmed by ultrasound examinations. Multilevel logistic regression models were used in the statistical analysis. Setting Sweden. Results During the study period, women gave birth to 720 357 infants, of whom 20 487 (2.8%) were SGA. Age-adjusted incidence rates of SGA births increased with increasing level of neighbourhood deprivation. In the total population, 2.5% of births in the least deprived neighbourhoods and 3.5% of births in the most deprived neighbourhoods were SGA. A similar pattern of higher incidence with increasing level of neighbourhood-level deprivation was observed across all individual-level sociodemographic categories, including maternal age, marital status, family income, educational attainment, employment, mobility and urban/rural status. High neighbourhood-level deprivation remained significantly associated with SGA risk after adjusting for maternal sociodemographic characteristics (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.34). Conclusions This study is the largest to date of the influence of neighbourhood on SGA birth, with SGA confirmed by ultrasound examination. Results suggest that the characteristics of a mother's neighbourhood affect the risk of delivering an SGA infant independently of maternal sociodemographic characteristics.
PubMed ID
21127005 View in PubMed
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Neighborhood linking social capital as a predictor of drug abuse: A Swedish national cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288180
Source
Addict Behav. 2016 Dec;63:37-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Jan Sundquist
Cecilia Sjöstedt
Marilyn Winkleby
Xinjun Li
Kenneth S Kendler
Kristina Sundquist
Source
Addict Behav. 2016 Dec;63:37-44
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Social capital
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Trust - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examines the association between the incidence of drug abuse (DA) and linking (communal) social capital, a theoretical concept describing the amount of trust between individuals and societal institutions.
We present results from an 8-year population-based cohort study that followed all residents in Sweden, aged 15-44, from 2003 through 2010, for a total of 1,700,896 men and 1,642,798 women. Linking social capital was conceptualized as the proportion of people in a geographically defined neighborhood who voted in local government elections. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and between-neighborhood variance.
We found robust associations between linking social capital and DA in men and women. For men, the OR for DA in the crude model was 2.11 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.02-2.21] for those living in neighborhoods with the lowest vs. highest level of social capital. After accounting for neighborhood level deprivation, the OR fell to 1.59 (1.51-1-68). The ORs remained significant after accounting for age, family income, marital status, country of birth, education level, and region of residence, and after further accounting for comorbidities and family history of comorbidities and family history of DA. For women, the OR decreased from 2.15 (2.03-2.27) in the crude model to 1.31 (1.22-1.40) in the final model, adjusted for multiple neighborhood-level, individual-level variables, and family history for DA.
Our study suggests that low linking social capital may have significant independent effects on DA.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27416013 View in PubMed
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Neighborhood socioeconomic environment and incidence of coronary heart disease: a follow-up study of 25,319 women and men in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53380
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Apr 1;159(7):655-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2004
Author
Kristina Sundquist
Marilyn Winkleby
Helena Ahlén
Sven-Erik Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. kristina.Sundquist@klinvet.ki.se
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Apr 1;159(7):655-62
Date
Apr-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Residence Characteristics
Social Environment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In this study, the authors examined whether neighborhood socioeconomic environment predicted incident coronary heart disease after adjustment for individual-level characteristics. A random sample of the Swedish population (25,319 women and men aged 35-74 years) was interviewed between 1986 and 1993 and was followed through December 1997 for incident coronary heart disease (1,189 events). Neighborhood socioeconomic environment was defined by small-area market statistics (6,145 neighborhoods) and measured by two indicators: neighborhood education (proportion of people with less than 10 years of education in the neighborhood) and neighborhood income (proportion of people with incomes in the lowest national income quartile). Separate multilevel Cox proportional hazards models showed that low neighborhood education and low neighborhood income each predicted incident coronary heart disease after adjustment for age, sex, and individual-level education and income (hazard ratios were 1.25 and 1.23, respectively). The authors conclude that neighborhood socioeconomic environment predicts incident coronary heart disease, having a significant effect on coronary heart disease risk beyond the individual effect.
PubMed ID
15033643 View in PubMed
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Preterm birth and unintentional injuries: risks to children, adolescents and young adults show no consistent pattern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118671
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Mar;102(3):287-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Susanna Calling
Karolina Palmér
Lena Jönsson
Jan Sundquist
Marilyn Winkleby
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Department of Clinical Science, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. susanna.calling@med.lu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Mar;102(3):287-93
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Factors
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Preterm birth is associated with a number of physical and mental health issues. The aim of this study was to find out whether there was also any association between individuals born preterm in Sweden between 1984 and 2006 and the risk of unintentional injuries during childhood, adolescence and young adulthood.
The study followed 2 297 134 individuals, including 5.9% born preterm, from 1985 to 2007 for unintentional injuries leading to hospitalization or death (n = 244 021). The males and females were divided into four age groups: 1-5 years, 6-12 years, 13-18 years and 19-23 years. Hazard ratios were calculated for falls, transport injuries and other injuries.
After adjusting for a comprehensive set of covariates, some of the preterm subgroups demonstrated slightly increased risks of unintentional injuries, while others showed slightly decreased risks. However, most of the estimates were borderline or non-significant in both males and females. In addition, the absolute risk differences between individuals born preterm and full term were small.
Despite the association between preterm birth and a variety of physical and mental health consequences, this study shows that there is no consistent risk pattern between preterm birth and unintentional injuries in childhood, adolescence and young adulthood.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23181809 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.