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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2019 01 29; 139(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
01-29-2019
Author
Sigrun Henjum
Marianne Hope Abel
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Lisbeth Dahl
Jan Alexander
Liv Elin Torheim
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2019 01 29; 139(2):
Date
01-29-2019
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Breast Feeding
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Humans
Infant
Iodine - administration & dosage - deficiency - therapeutic use - urine
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Milk, human - chemistry
Norway
Nutritional Status
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Recommended dietary allowances
Vegans
Abstract
In 2016, the Norwegian National Nutrition Council concluded that inadequate iodine intake is widespread in sections of the Norwegian population, and that effective measures should be undertaken immediately. This literature review aims to summarise articles published since January 2016 that describe the iodine intake in Norway.
Literature searches were conducted in PubMed and Embase. Altogether thirteen articles that reported intake of iodine from the diet or urinary iodine concentration were included.
The recent studies confirm that inadequate iodine intake is widespread among women of fertile age, pregnant and breastfeeding women, infants who are exclusively breastfed, elderly persons, vegans and immigrants. There are few sources of iodine in the diet, and persons who avoid or have a low intake of milk and white fish are particularly vulnerable.
Inadequate iodine intake is a matter of particular concern in women of fertile age. Healthcare personnel should be aware of this and in certain cases recommend iodine-rich foods or iodine supplements to these and other vulnerable groups.
PubMed ID
30698392 View in PubMed
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Maternal Iodine Intake and Offspring Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Results from a Large Prospective Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293042
Source
Nutrients. 2017 Nov 13; 9(11):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Nov-13-2017
Author
Marianne Hope Abel
Eivind Ystrom
Ida Henriette Caspersen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Heidi Aase
Liv Elin Torheim
Ragna Bugge Askeland
Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Author Affiliation
Division of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, 0456 Oslo, Norway. mariannehope.abel@fhi.no.
Source
Nutrients. 2017 Nov 13; 9(11):
Date
Nov-13-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Age Factors
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Child
Child Behavior
Dietary Supplements
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Iodine - administration & dosage - deficiency
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Norway - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Recommended dietary allowances
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Current knowledge about the relationship between mild to moderately inadequate maternal iodine intake and/or supplemental iodine on child neurodevelopment is sparse. Using information from 77,164 mother-child pairs in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, this study explored associations between maternal iodine intake and child attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis, registered in the Norwegian Patient Registry and maternally-reported child ADHD symptoms at eight years of age. Pregnant women reported food and supplement intakes by questionnaire in gestational week 22. In total, 1725 children (2.2%) were diagnosed with ADHD. In non-users of supplemental iodine (53,360 mothers), we found no association between iodine intake from food and risk of child ADHD diagnosis (p = 0.89), while low iodine from food (
Notes
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PubMed ID
29137191 View in PubMed
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Risk of suboptimal iodine intake in pregnant Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116519
Source
Nutrients. 2013 Feb;5(2):424-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Marianne Hope Abel
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Department of Exposure and Risk Assessment, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Nydalen, Norway. Anne.Lise.Brantsaeter@fhi.no
Source
Nutrients. 2013 Feb;5(2):424-40
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dairy Products
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Eggs
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Iodine - administration & dosage - deficiency
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Norway
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Status
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Seafood
Abstract
Pregnant women and infants are exceptionally vulnerable to iodine deficiency. The aims of the present study were to estimate iodine intake, to investigate sources of iodine, to identify predictors of low or suboptimal iodine intake (defined as intakes below 100 µg/day and 150 µg/day) in a large population of pregnant Norwegian women and to evaluate iodine status in a sub-population. Iodine intake was calculated based on a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort. The median iodine intake was 141 µg/day from food and 166 µg/day from food and supplements. Use of iodine-containing supplements was reported by 31.6%. The main source of iodine from food was dairy products, contributing 67% and 43% in non-supplement and iodine-supplement users, respectively. Of 61,904 women, 16.1% had iodine intake below 100 µg/day, 42.0% had iodine intake below 150 µg/day and only 21.7% reached the WHO/UNICEF/ICCIDD recommendation of 250 µg/day. Dietary behaviors associated with increased risk of low and suboptimal iodine intake were: no use of iodine-containing supplements and low intake of milk/yogurt, seafood and eggs. The median urinary iodine concentration measured in 119 participants (69 µg/L) confirmed insufficient iodine intake. Public health strategies are needed to improve and secure the iodine status of pregnant women in Norway.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23389302 View in PubMed
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