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Foreign-born women's lifestyle and health before and during early pregnancy in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307397
Source
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2020 Feb; 25(1):20-27
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2020
Author
Jenny Niemeyer Hultstrand
Tanja Tydén
Mats Målqvist
Maria Ekstrand Ragnar
Margareta Larsson
Maria Jonsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2020 Feb; 25(1):20-27
Date
Feb-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Europe - ethnology
Family Planning Services - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Life Style - ethnology
Preconception Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - ethnology - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - ethnology
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
Objectives: The aims of the study were to investigate foreign-born women's lifestyle and health before and during early pregnancy and compare them with those of Nordic-born women.Methods: Women recruited at antenatal clinics in Sweden answered a questionnaire in Swedish, English or Arabic or by telephone interview with an interpreter. Questions covered pregnancy planning and periconceptional lifestyle and health. The responses of women born in or outside Europe were compared with those of Nordic-born women. The impact of religiousness and integration on periconceptional lifestyle and health was also investigated.Results: Twelve percent of participants (N?=?3389) were foreign-born (n?=?414). Compared with Nordic women, European and non-European women consumed less alcohol before conception (respectively, adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.24, 0.58 and aOR 0.14; 95% CI 0.10, 0.19) and during early pregnancy (respectively, aOR 0.61; 95% CI 0.40, 0.91 and aOR 0.20; 95% CI 0.14, 0.29). Non-European women used less tobacco and were less physically active, but body mass index (BMI) did not differ between groups. Self-perceived health, stress and anxiety during early pregnancy did not differ, but non-European women more often had depressive symptoms (aOR 1.67; 95% CI 1.12, 2.51). Non-European women's healthy lifestyle was associated with religiousness but not with the level of integration.Conclusions: Non-European women were overall less likely to engage in harmful lifestyle habits before and during early pregnancy but were more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms in comparison with Nordic women.
PubMed ID
31914332 View in PubMed
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Important but far away: adolescents' beliefs, awareness and experiences of fertility and preconception health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297720
Source
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2018 Aug; 23(4):265-273
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
Maria Ekstrand Ragnar
Maria Grandahl
Jenny Stern
Magdalena Mattebo
Author Affiliation
a Department of Women's and Children's Health , Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.
Source
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2018 Aug; 23(4):265-273
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Culture
Female
Fertility
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Preconception Care - methods
Qualitative Research
Sex Education
Sexual Health
Sweden
Abstract
The aim was to explore adolescents' beliefs and awareness regarding fertility and preconception health, as well as their views and experiences of information about fertility and preconception health directed at their age group.
We performed seven semi-structured focus group interviews among upper secondary school students (n?=?47) aged 16-18 years in two Swedish counties. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis.
One theme ('important but far away') and five categories ('starting a family far down on the list'; 'high awareness but patchy knowledge of fertility and preconception health'; 'gender roles influence beliefs about fertility and preconception health'; 'wish to preserve fertility and preconception health in order to keep the door to procreation open'; 'no panacea - early and continuous education about fertility and preconception health') emerged from the interviews. Participants recognised the importance of preconception health and were highly aware of the overall importance of a healthy lifestyle. Their knowledge, however, was patchy and they had difficulties relating to fertility and preconception health on a personal and behavioural level. Participants wanted more information but had heterogeneous beliefs about when, where and how this information should be given.
The adolescents wanted information on fertility and preconception health to be delivered repeatedly as well as through different sources.
PubMed ID
30010448 View in PubMed
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