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Cross-validation of the Depression, Anxiety, and Positive Outlook Scale (DAPOS) for clinical use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138414
Source
Clin J Pain. 2011 May;27(4):330-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Patricia Olaya-Contreras
Jorma Styf
Mari Lundberg
Bengt Jansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Orthopedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Per Dubbsgatan 14, Gothenburg, Sweden. patricia.olaya@orthop.gu.se
Source
Clin J Pain. 2011 May;27(4):330-7
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Chi-Square Distribution
Chronic Disease
Depression - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - complications
Pain - complications
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics - methods
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The main objective of this study was to investigate different psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Depression, Anxiety, and Positive Outlook Scale (DAPOS) in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain in an orthopedic setting.
A total of 449 participants took part in the study, including 288 patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain and 161 participants in a reference group. Internal consistency, convergent validity, and measurement invariance of the constructs of DAPOS were investigated across sex and diagnostic groups. The Beck Depression Inventory and the Spielberger Anxiety Inventory were used for measures of convergent validity. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis was performed to test measurement invariance of the theoretical constructs of DAPOS.
Internal consistency was good for all 3 constructs, and correlations concerned with convergent validity were found to be acceptable to good. With regard to cross-validation, the 3 constructs of DAPOS were strictly measurement invariant with respect to sex. Across diagnostic groups, the constructs of anxiety and positive outlook were almost strictly measurement invariant, although there were some restrictions of measurement invariance for the construct of depression.
To be able to rely on an instrument with as few items as DAPOS, the cross-validation of its constructs for sex and diagnostic groups is a valuable information, particularly when investigated in patients with musculoskeletal pain. Based on these results, we recommend that DAPOS could replace longer and more time-consuming screening tests in clinical settings.
PubMed ID
21178595 View in PubMed
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Kinesiophobia among patients with musculoskeletal pain in primary healthcare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49551
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2006 Jan;38(1):37-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Mari Lundberg
Maria Larsson
Helene Ostlund
Jorma Styf
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Division of Occupational Orthopaedics, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden. mari.lundberg@orthop.gu.se
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2006 Jan;38(1):37-43
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Kinesthesis
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Pain - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Pain Measurement
Phobic Disorders - etiology - psychology - therapy
Physical Therapy Modalities
Primary Health Care
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe the occurrence of kinesiophobia and to investigate the association between kinesiphobia and pain variables, physical exercise measures and psychological characteristics in patients with musculoskeletal pain. DESIGN: A prospective descriptive study involving 2 selected physiotherapy departments within a primary healthcare setting in the south-west of Sweden. PATIENTS: Included were 140 of 369 (38%) consecutive patients (aged between 18 and 65 years) with musculoskeletal pain. METHODS: Questionnaires including background data, pain variables, physical exercise measures and psychological characteristics were sent to the patients prior to their appointment with the physiotherapist. A simple and a multiple logistic regression model were performed to identify associations among the variables where kinesiophobia was defined as the dependent variable. RESULTS: A high degree of kinesiophobia and psychological distress were observed in approximately 50% of the responders. According to the simple logistic regression analysis the factors that seemed to be associated with kinesiophobia were interference, disability, pain severity, pain intensity, life control, affective distress, depressed mood and solicitous response. The multiple logistic regression analysis showed no significant associations. CONCLUSION: Kinesiophobia is a commonly seen factor among patients with musculoskeletal pain, which ought to be taken into consideration when designing and performing rehabilitation programmes.
PubMed ID
16548085 View in PubMed
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My prosthesis as a part of me: a qualitative analysis of living with an osseointegrated prosthetic limb.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133503
Source
Prosthet Orthot Int. 2011 Jun;35(2):207-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Mari Lundberg
Kerstin Hagberg
Jennifer Bullington
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. mari.lundberg@orthop.gu.se
Source
Prosthet Orthot Int. 2011 Jun;35(2):207-14
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - physiology
Adult
Aged
Amputees - psychology - rehabilitation
Artificial Limbs - classification - psychology
Female
Femur - surgery
Humans
Humerus - surgery
Interview, Psychological
Learning - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Osseointegration - physiology
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Radius - surgery
Sweden
Abstract
Bone-anchored prosthesis is still a rather unusual treatment for patients with limb loss.
The aim of this study was to improve our understanding about the experience of living with an osseointegrated prosthesis (OI-prosthesis) compared to one suspended with a socket, through the use of qualitative research methodology.
A qualitative phenomenological research method.
Thirteen Swedish patients (37-67 years) with unilateral upper or lower limb amputation (10 transfemoral, 2 transhumeral, 1 transradial), who had been using OI-prostheses for 3 to 15 years, were recruited by means of purposive sampling. An audio-taped in-depth interview was performed. The guiding question was 'How do you experience living with your osseointegrated prosthesis compared to your earlier prostheses suspended with sockets?'. The empirical phenomenological psychological method was used for data analysis.
The results showed that all participants described living with an OI-prosthesis as a revolutionary change. These experiences were described in terms of three typologies, called 'Practical prosthesis', 'Pretend limb' and 'A part of me'.
The most important finding was that the change went beyond the functional improvements, integrating the existential implications in the concept of quality of life.
This qualitative in-depth interview study on patients using bone-anchored prosthetic limbs showed that all described a revolutionary change in their lives as amputees and the meaning of that change went beyond the functional improvements, integrating existential implications in the concept of quality of life.
PubMed ID
21697203 View in PubMed
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