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"An on-going individual adjustment": a qualitative study of midwives' experiences counselling pregnant women on physical activity in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271845
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:343
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Maria Lindqvist
Ingrid Mogren
Eva Eurenius
Kristina Edvardsson
Margareta Persson
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:343
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Body Size
Directive Counseling
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Midwifery
Motor Activity
Patient Education as Topic
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Qualitative Research
Somatotypes
Sweden
Abstract
In Sweden, midwives play prominent supportive role in antenatal care by counselling and promoting healthy lifestyles. This study aimed to explore how Swedish midwives experience the counselling of pregnant women on physical activity, specifically focusing on facilitators and barriers during pregnancy. Also, addressing whether the midwives perceive that their own lifestyle and body shape may influence the content of the counselling they provide.
Eight focus group discussions (FGD) were conducted with 41 midwives working in antenatal care clinics in different parts of Sweden between September 2013 and January 2014. Purposive sampling was applied to ensure a variation in age, work experience, and geographical location. The FGD were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis.
The main theme--"An on-going individual adjustment" was built on three categories: "Counselling as a challenge"; "Counselling as walking the thin ice" and "Counselling as an opportunity" reflecting the midwives on-going need to adjust their counselling depending on each woman's specific situation. Furthermore, counselling pregnant women on physical activity was experienced as complex and ambiguous, presenting challenges as well as opportunities. When midwives challenged barriers to physical activity, they risked being rejected by the pregnant women. Despite risking rejection, the midwives tried to promote increased physical activity based on their assessment of individual needs of the pregnant woman. Some participants felt that their own lifestyle and body shape might negatively influence the counselling; however, the majority of participants did not agree with this perspective.
Counselling on physical activity during pregnancy may be a challenging task for midwives, characterized by on-going adjustments based on a pregnant woman's individual needs. Midwives strive to find individual solutions to encourage physical activity. However, to improve their counselling, midwives may benefit from further training, also organizational and financial barriers need to be addressed. Such efforts might result in improved opportunities to further support pregnant women's motivation for performance of physical activity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25269457 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between birth by cesarean section and adolescent cardiorespiratory fitness in a cohort of 339,451 Swedish males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311263
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 10 29; 10(1):18661
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-29-2020
Author
Lucas D Ekstrom
Viktor H Ahlqvist
Margareta Persson
Cecilia Magnusson
Daniel Berglind
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodavägen 18A, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. lucas.ekstrom@ki.se.
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 10 29; 10(1):18661
Date
10-29-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Cesarean Section
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Sweden
Abstract
Birth by cesarean section is increasing worldwide and associates with offspring morbidities capable of adversely impacting cardiorespiratory fitness later in life. Whether birth by cesarean section associates with lower levels of cardiorespiratory fitness later in life is unknown and is of interest to public health. Four Swedish national registers were linked to follow 339,451 singleton males, born between 1973-1987 until December 31 2005, for Watt-maximum achieved on a cycle ergometer test at conscription into the Swedish military. Main exposure was birth by cesarean section which was compared to vaginal birth. A sub-population of 45,999 males born between 1982-1987 was identified to explore differentiated associations between elective and non-elective cesarean section with Watt-maximum. Within-family analyses of 34,252 families with 70,632 biological male siblings, who conscripted during the study period, were performed to explore the role of familial confounding on Watt-maximum. Swedish males born by cesarean section achieved lower mean Watt-maximum (- 2.32 W, 95%C.I. - 2.90 to - 1.75) and displayed excess odds of low cardiorespiratory fitness (aOR?=?1.08, 95%C.I. 1.05 to 1.11) at conscription in the eighteenth life-year compared to males born vaginally after adjusting for birth characteristics, maternal morbidities and parental socioeconomic position. In the sub-population, males born 1982-1987, there was a greater negative association of elective cesarean section with cardiorespiratory fitness (- 4.42 W, 95%C.I. - 6.27 to - 2.57, p?
PubMed ID
33122786 View in PubMed
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Change of lifestyle habits - Motivation and ability reported by pregnant women in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291858
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2017 Oct; 13:83-90
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Maria Lindqvist
Marie Lindkvist
Eva Eurenius
Margareta Persson
Ingrid Mogren
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Umeå University, Sweden. Electronic address: maria.lindqvist@umu.se.
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2017 Oct; 13:83-90
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Ethnic Groups
Exercise
Feeding Behavior
Female
Habits
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Motivation
Obesity - etiology - prevention & control
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology - prevention & control
Pregnant Women
Self Report
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Pregnant women are generally more motivated to change their lifestyle habits compared with non-pregnant women. However, the ability to change these habits depends on the motivation to change. This study describes pregnant women's self-reported motivation and ability to change lifestyle habits and their relation to body mass index (BMI), self-rated health, educational level and country of origin.
This cross-sectional study combined data from the Maternal Health Care Register in Västerbotten (MHCR-VB) and the Salut Programme Register (Salut-R). Data were collected from 3,868 pregnant residents in Västerbotten County (northern Sweden) between 2011 and 2012. Chi-square test, two independent samples t-test and univariate and multivariate logistic regression were performed.
Most of the pregnant women (61.3%) were satisfied with their self-reported lifestyle habits irrespective of BMI, self-rated health, educational level, and country of origin. Many reported that they wanted to increase their physical activity, improve their dietary habits, and reduce their weight. In general, they estimated their ability to change their lifestyle habits as equal to their motivation of change. Women who reported a large or very large motivation to change their lifestyle habits were characterized by higher BMI and higher educational level.
Most of the participating pregnant women were satisfied with their lifestyle habits, although they reported being further motivated to change some of them. Health care professionals encountering fertile and pregnant women may have a unique opportunity to support and promote lifestyle changes, taking into account women's motivation for change. Future research should focus on factors that motivate pregnant women to change their lifestyle, explore barriers for change of lifestyle and how support best may be provided to pregnant women. In addition, studies on lifestyle and motivation for lifestyle change from non-Nordic countries are called for.
PubMed ID
28844363 View in PubMed
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"Dealing with ambiguity"-the role of obstetricians in gestational diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101387
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2011 Jul 24;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-24-2011
Author
Margareta Persson
Asa Hörnsten
Anna Winkvist
Ingrid Mogren
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Umeå University, Sweden Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden Institute of Medicine, Department of Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2011 Jul 24;
Date
Jul-24-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Objective. Gestational diabetes mellitus is a pregnancy-related complication; hence obstetricians counsel and manage the maternal health care for these women. This study describes obstetricians' experiences of management of pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Design. Interview study. Setting. Hospital-based specialist maternal health care clinics in Sweden. Population. A consecutive purposive national sample of seventeen obstetricians providing maternal health care to pregnant women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus. Methods. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Result. The overall theme describing the experiences of the obstetricians was labeled 'Dealing with ambiguity'. This ambiguity permeated all aspects of working as an obstetrician within the maternal health care; the role of the obstetrician, the context of organization, the multifaceted maternal and fetal interests to balance, and lack of consensus, recommendations and evidence-based knowledge. Conclusions. The study revealed the ambiguous situation experienced and managed by obstetricians providing maternal health care to pregnant women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus. This indicates a need for national guidelines and standardized maternal health care services regarding gestational diabetes mellitus to fulfill the intentions of the health care system. Such recommendations may be beneficial and supportive for the health care professionals as well as for the mother-to-be and her fetus.
PubMed ID
21793809 View in PubMed
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Elective and nonelective cesarean section and obesity among young adult male offspring: A Swedish population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307837
Source
PLoS Med. 2019 12; 16(12):e1002996
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2019
Author
Viktor H Ahlqvist
Margareta Persson
Cecilia Magnusson
Daniel Berglind
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
PLoS Med. 2019 12; 16(12):e1002996
Date
12-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Weight - physiology
Body mass index
Cesarean Section - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Maternal Age
Overweight - epidemiology
Pediatric Obesity - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that cesarean section (CS) is associated with offspring overweight and obesity. However, few studies have been able to differentiate between elective and nonelective CS, which may differ in their maternal risk profile and biological pathway. Therefore, we aimed to examine the association between differentiated forms of delivery with CS and risk of obesity in young adulthood.
Using Swedish population registers, a cohort of 97,291 males born between 1982 and 1987 were followed from birth until conscription (median 18 years of age) if they conscripted before 2006. At conscription, weight and height were measured and transformed to World Health Organization categories of body mass index (BMI). Maternal and infant data were obtained from the Medical Birth Register. Associations were evaluated using multinomial and linear regressions. Furthermore, a series of sensitivity analyses were conducted, including fixed-effects regressions to account for confounders shared between full brothers. The mothers of the conscripts were on average 28.5 (standard deviation 4.9) years old at delivery and had a prepregnancy BMI of 21.9 (standard deviation 3.0), and 41.5% of the conscripts had at least one parent with university-level education. Out of the 97,291 conscripts we observed, 4.9% were obese (BMI = 30) at conscription. The prevalence of obesity varied slightly between vaginal delivery, elective CS, and nonelective CS (4.9%, 5.5%, and 5.6%, respectively), whereas BMI seemed to be consistent across modes of delivery. We found no evidence of an association between nonelective or elective CS and young adulthood obesity (relative risk ratio 0.96, confidence interval 95% 0.83-1.10, p = 0.532 and relative risk ratio 1.02, confidence interval 95% 0.88-1.18, p = 0.826, respectively) as compared with vaginal delivery after accounting for prepregnancy maternal BMI, maternal diabetes at delivery, maternal hypertension at delivery, maternal smoking, parity, parental education, maternal age at delivery, gestational age, birth weight standardized according to gestational age, and preeclampsia. We found no evidence of an association between any form of CS and overweight (BMI = 25) as compared with vaginal delivery. Sibling analysis and several sensitivity analyses did not alter our findings. The main limitations of our study were that not all conscripts had available measures of anthropometry and/or important confounders (42% retained) and that our cohort only included a male population.
We found no evidence of an association between elective or nonelective CS and young adulthood obesity in young male conscripts when accounting for maternal and prenatal factors. This suggests that there is no clinically relevant association between CS and the development of obesity. Further large-scale studies are warranted to examine the association between differentiated forms of CS and obesity in young adult offspring.
Registered as observational study at ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03918044.
PubMed ID
31809506 View in PubMed
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High weight gain during pregnancy increases the risk for emergency caesarean section - Population-based data from the Swedish Maternal Health Care Register 2011-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283519
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2017 Mar;11:47-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Carin Nilses
Margareta Persson
Marie Lindkvist
Kerstin Petersson
Ingrid Mogren
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2017 Mar;11:47-52
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section
Cross-Sectional Studies
Elective Surgical Procedures
Emergency Treatment
Female
Humans
Maternal health
Maternal health services
Obesity - complications
Overweight - complications
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Reference Values
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Weight Gain
Abstract
The aim was to investigate maternal background factors' significance in relation to risk of elective and emergency caesarean sections (CS) in Sweden.
Population-based, retrospective, cross-sectional study. The Swedish Maternal Health Care Register (MHCR) is a national quality register that collects data on pregnancy, delivery and postpartum period. All women registered in MHCR 2011 to 2012 were included in the study sample (N?=?178,716).
The risk of elective and emergency caesarean section in relation to age, parity, education, country of origin, weight in early pregnancy and weight gain during pregnancy was calculated in logistic regression models.
Multiparous women demonstrated a doubled risk of elective CS compared to primiparous women, but their risk for emergency CS was halved. Overweight and obesity at enrolment in antenatal care increased the risk for emergency CS, irrespective of parity. Weight gain above recommended international levels (Institute of Medicine, IOM) during pregnancy increased the risk for emergency CS for women with normal weight, overweight or obesity.
There is a need of national guidelines on recommended weight gain during pregnancy in Sweden. We suggest that the usefulness of the IOM guidelines for weight gain during pregnancy should be evaluated in the Swedish context.
PubMed ID
28159128 View in PubMed
Less detail

Internal validity of the Swedish Maternal Health Care Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262696
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2014;14:364
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Kerstin Petersson
Margareta Persson
Marie Lindkvist
Margareta Hammarström
Carin Nilses
Ingrid Haglund
Yvonne Skogsdal
Ingrid Mogren
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2014;14:364
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Maternal health services
Medical Records
Pregnancy
Registries - standards
Sweden
Abstract
The Swedish Maternal Health Care Register (MHCR) is a national quality register that has been collecting pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum data since 1999. A substantial revision of the MHCR resulted in a Web-based version of the register in 2010. Although MHCR provides data for health care services and research, the validity of the MHCR data has not been evaluated. This study investigated degree of coverage and internal validity of specific variables in the MHCR and identified possible systematic errors.
This cross-sectional observational study compared pregnancy and delivery data in medical records with corresponding data in the MHCR. The medical record was considered the gold standard. The medical records from nine Swedish hospitals were selected for data extraction. This study compared data from 878 women registered in both medical records and in the MHCR. To evaluate the quality of the initial data extraction, a second data extraction of 150 medical records was performed. Statistical analyses were performed for degree of coverage, agreement and correlation of data, and sensitivity and specificity.
Degree of coverage of specified variables in the MHCR varied from 90.0% to 100%. Identical information in both medical records and the MHCR ranged from 71.4% to 99.7%. For more than half of the investigated variables, 95% or more of the information was identical. Sensitivity and specificity were analysed for binary variables. Probable systematic errors were identified for two variables.
When comparing data from medical records and data registered in the MHCR, most variables in the MHCR demonstrated good to very good degree of coverage, agreement, and internal validity. Hence, data from the MHCR may be regarded as reliable for research as well as for evaluating, planning, and decision-making with respect to Swedish maternal health care services.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25175811 View in PubMed
Less detail

Leisure time physical activity among pregnant women and its associations with maternal characteristics and pregnancy outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281888
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Oct;9:14-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Maria Lindqvist
Marie Lindkvist
Eva Eurenius
Margareta Persson
Anneli Ivarsson
Ingrid Mogren
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Oct;9:14-20
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Exercise
Female
Health
Health Behavior
Humans
Leisure Activities
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnant Women
Registries
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Physical activity during pregnancy is generally considered safe and beneficial for both the pregnant woman and her fetus. The overall aim was to investigate pregnant women's pre-pregnancy and early pregnancy physical activity and its associations with maternal characteristics and pregnancy outcomes.
This cross-sectional study combined data from the Maternal Health Care Register in Västerbotten (MHCR-VB) and the Salut Programme Register (Salut-R). Data were collected from 3,868 pregnant women living in northern Sweden between 2011 and 2012.
Almost half of the participants (47.1%) achieved the recommended level of physical activity. Compared to the women who did not achieve the recommended level of exercise, these women had lower BMI, very good or good self-rated health, and a higher educational level. No significant associations could be established between physical activity levels and GDM, birth weight, or mode of delivery.
Positively, a considerably high proportion of Swedish pregnant women achieved the recommended level of physical activity. Factors associated with recommended physical activity level were BMI =30?kg/m(2), very good or good self-rated health, and higher educational level. Our findings emphasize the need for health care professionals to early detect and promote fertile and pregnant women towards health-enhancing physical activity, especially those with low levels of physical activity and overweight/obesity, to improve overall health in this population.
PubMed ID
27634659 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lifestyle and health status in a sample of Swedish women four years after pregnancy: a comparison of women with a history of normal pregnancy and women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269267
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2015;15:57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Margareta Persson
Anna Winkvist
Ingrid Mogren
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2015;15:57
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Diabetes, Gestational - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Food Habits - physiology - psychology
Health Behavior
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life Style
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity - diagnosis - diet therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Postpartum Period - physiology - psychology
Pregnancy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Despite the recommendations to continue the regime of healthy food and physical activity (PA) postpartum for women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), the scientific evidence reveals that these recommendations may not be complied to. This study compared lifestyle and health status in women whose pregnancy was complicated by GDM with women who had a normal pregnancy and delivery.
The inclusion criteria were women with GDM (ICD-10: O24.4 A and O24.4B) and women with uncomplicated pregnancy and delivery in 2005 (ICD-10: O80.0). A random sample of women fulfilling the criteria (n = 882) were identified from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. A questionnaire was sent by mail to eligible women approximately four years after the pregnancy. A total of 444 women (50.8%) agreed to participate, 111 diagnosed with GDM in their pregnancy and 333 with normal pregnancy/delivery.
Women with previous GDM were significantly older, reported higher body weight and less PA before the index pregnancy. No major differences between the groups were noticed regarding lifestyle at the follow-up. Overall, few participants fulfilled the national recommendations of PA and diet. At the follow-up, 19 participants had developed diabetes, all with previous GDM. Women with previous GDM reported significantly poorer self-rated health (SRH), higher level of sick-leave and more often using medication on regular basis. However, a history of GDM or having overt diabetes mellitus showed no association with poorer SRH in the multivariate analysis. Irregular eating habits, no regular PA, overweight/obesity, and regular use of medication were associated with poorer SRH in all participants.
Suboptimal levels of PA, and fruit and vegetable consumption were found in a sample of women with a history of GDM as well as for women with normal pregnancy approximately four years after index pregnancy. Women with previous GDM seem to increase their PA after childbirth, but still they perform their PA at lower intensity than women with a history of normal pregnancy. Having GDM at index pregnancy or being diagnosed with overt diabetes mellitus at follow-up did not demonstrate associations with poorer SRH four years after delivery.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25884665 View in PubMed
Less detail

"Longing for individual recognition" - Pregnant women's experiences of midwives' counselling on physical activity during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294538
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2018 Mar; 15:46-53
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Maria Lindqvist
Margareta Persson
Ingrid Mogren
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: maria.lindqvist@umu.se.
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2018 Mar; 15:46-53
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Attitude of Health Personnel
Counseling
Culture
Exercise
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Midwifery
Nurse Midwives
Nurse-Patient Relations
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Prenatal Care
Professional Competence
Qualitative Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Trust
Young Adult
Abstract
The aims to explore among pregnant women were their experiences of lifestyle counselling provided by a midwife in antenatal care, addressing health promotion with special focus on physical activity during pregnancy, and factors influencing the trustworthiness of counselling conducted by a midwife.
This qualitative study collected data from 14 pregnant, primiparous or multiparous women in gestational week 35-36 using in-depth interviews. The data were collected in Sweden in 2015. Qualitative content analysis was applied.
The theme "Longing for fulfilment of individual needs and expectations" emerged during analysis, including four categories; "Being exposed to unsatisfying counselling"; "Appreciating supportive and trustworthy counselling"; "Wrestling with cultures", and "Dealing with physical activity in daily life". The results indicated that some participants experienced limited counselling that was characterized by lack of knowledge, support, and trustworthiness in the midwife. Other participants reported valuable encouragement and support by the midwife. Participants were longing for individual recognition instead of receiving general advice on physical activity that was designed for all pregnant women.
Individual counselling on physical activity during pregnancy based on the participant's individual needs was desired. On the contrary, the participants could experience the midwife as having her own agenda, insufficient knowledge and primarily focusing on medical surveillance. There is a need of increased level of knowledge among midwives in antenatal care, regarding lifestyle and lifestyle change during pregnancy. This may enhance promotion of a healthy lifestyle for the pregnant woman during counselling.
PubMed ID
29389501 View in PubMed
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