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Adverse childhood experiences influence development of pain during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266646
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Aug;94(8):840-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Jennifer Drevin
Jenny Stern
Eva-Maria Annerbäck
Magnus Peterson
Stephen Butler
Tanja Tydén
Anna Berglund
Margareta Larsson
Per Kristiansson
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Aug;94(8):840-6
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Pain Measurement
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate the association between adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and pain with onset during pregnancy.
Cross-sectional study.
Eighteen antenatal clinics in southern Mid-Sweden.
Of 293 women invited to participate, 232 (79%) women agreed to participate in early pregnancy and were assessed in late pregnancy.
Questionnaires were distributed in early and late pregnancy. The questionnaires sought information on socio-demography, ACE, pain location by pain drawing and pain intensity by visual analogue scales. Distribution of pain was coded in 41 predetermined areas.
Pain in third trimester with onset during present pregnancy: intensity, location and number of pain locations.
In late pregnancy, 62% of the women reported any ACE and 72% reported any pain location with onset during the present pregnancy. Among women reporting any ACE the median pain intensity was higher compared with women without such an experience (p = 0.01). The accumulated ACE displayed a positive association with the number of reported pain locations in late pregnancy (rs = 0.19, p = 0.02). This association remained significant after adjusting for background factors in multiple regression analysis (p = 0.01). When ACE was dichotomized the prevalence of pain did not differ between women with and without ACE. The subgroup of women reporting physical abuse as a child reported a higher prevalence of sacral and pelvic pain (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.02, respectively).
Adverse childhood experiences were associated with higher pain intensities and larger pain distributions in late pregnancy, which are risk factors for transition to chronic pain postpartum.
PubMed ID
25965273 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption among partners of pregnant women in Sweden: a cross sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284184
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Aug 02;16:694
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-02-2016
Author
Hjördis Högberg
Janna Skagerström
Fredrik Spak
Per Nilsen
Margareta Larsson
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Aug 02;16:694
Date
Aug-02-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Attitude to Health
Binge drinking
Counseling
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethanol - administration & dosage
Fathers
Female
Humans
Male
Midwifery
Motivation
Patient satisfaction
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Prenatal Care
Sexual Partners
Social Behavior
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Antenatal care in Sweden involves a visit in pregnancy week 6-7 for counseling about lifestyle issues, including alcohol. The aim of this study was to investigate alcohol consumption among partners of pregnant women, their motives for changing drinking patterns when becoming a parent and their perceptions of the midwife's counseling about alcohol.
The study was conducted at 30 antenatal care centers across Sweden in 2009-2010. All partners who accompanied a pregnant women in pregnancy week >17 were asked to participate. The questionnaire included questions on alcohol consumption.
Questionnaires from 444 partners were analyzed. Most, 95 %, of the partners reported alcohol consumption before pregnancy; 18 % were binge drinking (6 standard drinks or more per occasion, each drink containing 12 grams of pure alcohol) at least once every month during the last year. More than half, 58 %, of all partners had decreased their alcohol consumption following pregnancy recognition and a higher proportion of binge drinkers decreased their consumption compared to non-frequent binge drinkers (p?=?0.025). Their motives varied; the pregnancy itself, fewer social gatherings (potentially involving alcohol consumption) and a sense of responsibility for the pregnant partner were reported. Of the partners, 37 % reported support for decreased drinking from others (pregnant partner, parents, friend or workmates). Further, most partners appreciated the midwife's counseling on alcohol.
A majority of partners decreased their alcohol consumption in transition to parenthood, which also appears to be a crucial time for changing alcohol-drinking patterns. The partners with higher AUDIT-C scores reported more support for decreased drinking. Most partners appreciated the midwife's talk about alcohol and pregnancy and those who filled out AUDIT in early pregnancy reported that the counseling was more engaging. During pregnancy it is possible to detect partners with high alcohol consumption, and promote interventions for decreased drinking, also for the partners. Written information addressing alcohol use and directed to partners is needed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27484750 View in PubMed
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Bringing emergency contraception over the counter: experiences of nonprescription users in France, Norway, Sweden and Portugal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183811
Source
Contraception. 2003 Aug;68(2):117-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Erin Gainer
Jennifer Blum
Else Lydia Toverud
Nuno Portugal
Tanja Tyden
Britt Ingjerd Nesheim
Margareta Larsson
Duarte Vilar
Pernille Nymoen
Gunilla Aneblom
Arielle Lutwick
Beverly Winikoff
Author Affiliation
Research and Development, Laboratoire HRA Pharma, 75020 Paris, France. gainer@hra-pharma.com
Source
Contraception. 2003 Aug;68(2):117-24
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Attitude
Contraception, Postcoital - adverse effects - utilization
Female
France
Humans
Nonprescription Drugs - standards
Norway
Portugal
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Emergency contraceptive pills are now available on a nonprescription basis in over 25 countries worldwide. In an effort to learn about women's experiences with this new means of emergency contraception (EC) service delivery, we conducted focus-group discussions with nonprescription EC users from France, Norway, Portugal and Sweden. Participants from these countries overwhelming supported pharmacy access to EC, explaining that pharmacy delivery facilitated rapid access to the method. Despite expressing mixed reviews of the counseling given by the providing pharmacists, participants reported that they knew how use the method safely and properly. Most indicated that the package insert was easy to understand and adequately answered the majority of their questions. Participants described the EC experience as a motivating factor that, in many cases, has led to more consistent use of regular contraceptive methods. These data are valuable to policy-makers and institutions interested in learning more about the safety and acceptability of nonprescription access to emergency contraceptive pills.
PubMed ID
12954524 View in PubMed
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Can Reproductive Life Plan-based counselling increase men's fertility awareness?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298204
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2018 Dec; 123(4):255-263
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Maja Bodin
Tanja Tydén
Lisa Käll
Margareta Larsson
Author Affiliation
a Department of Women's and Children's Health , Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2018 Dec; 123(4):255-263
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Counseling - methods
Family Planning Services - methods
Fertility
Health Behavior
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Preconception Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Many men have limited knowledge about reproductive health and fertility. The aim of the study was to evaluate if Reproductive Life Plan (RLP)-based counselling during a sexual health visit could increase men's fertility awareness.
The study was a randomized controlled trial including 201 men aged 18-50 who visited either of two participating sexual health clinics in Sweden for sexually transmitted infection testing during 2014-2016. All men received standard care, and men in the intervention group (IG) also received oral and written RLP-based information about lifestyle and fertility. Awareness about fertility and lifestyle-related factors were the main outcomes, measured through a questionnaire before the intervention and through a telephone survey after three months. Impressions from the counselling were also assessed at follow-up.
A majority (71%) of men wanted children in the future. General fertility awareness increased from a mean score of 4.6 to 5.5 out of 12 (P?=?0.004) in the IG. The mean number of accurate lifestyle factors (that could affect fertility) mentioned increased from 3.6 to 4.4 (P?
PubMed ID
30541376 View in PubMed
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Challenges and opportunities of a new HPV immunization program perceptions among Swedish school nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134709
Source
Vaccine. 2011 Jun 20;29(28):4576-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-2011
Author
Maria Gottvall
Tanja Tydén
Margareta Larsson
Christina Stenhammar
Anna T Höglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 564, 751 22 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Vaccine. 2011 Jun 20;29(28):4576-83
Date
Jun-20-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Immunization - psychology
Immunization Programs
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus Infections - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage
Professional Competence
School Nursing
Sweden
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Abstract
To investigate school nurses' perceptions of HPV immunization, and their task of administering the vaccine in a planned school-based program in Sweden.
Data were collected through five focus group interviews with school nurses (n=30). The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis.
The theme Positive attitude to HPV immunization despite many identified problems and challenges summarizes the results. The school nurses saw the program as a benefit in that the free school-based HPV immunization program could balance out social inequalities. However, they questioned whether this new immunization program should be given priority given their already tight schedule. Some also expressed doubts regarding the effect of the vaccine. It was seen as challenging to obtain informed consent as well as to provide information regarding the vaccine. The nurses were unsure of whether boys and their parents should also be informed about the immunization.
Although some positive aspects of the new HPV immunization program were mentioned, the school nurses primarily identified problems and challenges; e.g. regarding priority setting, informed consent, culture and gender. In order to achieve a good work environment for the school nurses, and obtain a high coverage rate for the HPV immunization, these issues need to be taken seriously, be discussed and acted upon.
PubMed ID
21549793 View in PubMed
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Coherence of pregnancy planning within couples expecting a child.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272541
Source
Midwifery. 2015 Oct;31(10):973-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Maja Bodin
Jenny Stern
Lisa Folkmarson Käll
Tanja Tydén
Margareta Larsson
Source
Midwifery. 2015 Oct;31(10):973-8
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comprehension
Family Planning Services
Female
Humans
Male
Marriage - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy - psychology
Spouses - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
joint planning and decision-making within couples have evident effects on the well-being of the family. The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of pregnancy planning among pregnant women and their partners and to compare the coherence of pregnancy planning within the couples.
pregnant women and their partners were recruited from 18 antenatal clinics in seven Swedish counties between October 2011 and April 2012. Participants, 232 pregnant women and 144 partners, filled out a questionnaire with questions about pregnancy planning, lifestyle and relationship satisfaction. 136 couples were identified and the women?s and partners? answers were compared.
more than 75% of the pregnancies were very or rather planned and almost all participants had agreed with their partner to become pregnant. There was no significant difference in level of pregnancy planning between women and partners, and coherence within couples was strong. Level of planning was not affected by individual socio-demographic variables. Furthermore, 98 % of women and 94 % of partners had non-distressed relationships.
one of the most interesting results was the strong coherence between partners concerning their pregnancy and relationship. Approaching these results from a social constructivist perspective brings to light an importance of togetherness and how a sense and impression of unity within a couple might be constructed in different ways. As implications for practice, midwives and other professionals counselling persons in fertile age should enquire about and emphasise the benefits of equality and mutual pregnancy planning for both women and men.
PubMed ID
26165170 View in PubMed
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Contraceptive use and associated factors among Swedish high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163101
Source
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2007 Jun;12(2):119-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Margareta Larsson
Tanja Tydén
Ulf Hanson
Elisabet Häggström-Nordin
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. margareta.larsson@kbh.uu.se
Source
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2007 Jun;12(2):119-24
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Contraception - psychology - utilization
Contraception Behavior - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Students
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate self-reported sexual experiences, abortions, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), use of contraception and possible influencing factors on contraceptive use among Swedish high school students.
An anonymous classroom survey was distributed to a random sample (n = 924) of 18-year-old high school students in a medium-sized Swedish city. The response rate was 78% (n = 718).
Three out of four students had experienced intercourse and the majority of them stated that they were satisfied with their sexual life. Few students reported having had an abortion (5%) or a STI (4%). Alcohol use appeared the most important contributing risk factor for non-use of contraception in relation to both first and latest intercourse, and the young men reported more unprotected latest intercourse than the young women did.
The fact that young men appear less inclined to use contraception is disturbing, and must be addressed in sexual education and individual counseling to promote a better sexual health for adolescents.
PubMed ID
17559009 View in PubMed
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Contraceptive use during the reproductive lifecycle as reported by 46-year-old women in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127090
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2012 Mar;3(1):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Annelie Sköld
Margareta Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden. annelie_skold@hotmail.com
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2012 Mar;3(1):43-7
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coitus
Contraception - methods - utilization
Contraception Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Contraceptive Devices - utilization
Contraceptives, Oral
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Female
Fertility
Gynecology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Midwifery
Motivation
Parity
Pregnancy
Professional-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Sexual Partners
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the contraceptive methods 46-year-old women in Sweden had chosen during different phases of their reproductive lifecycle and, the factors affecting their choice.
The design was a retrospective cross-sectional study and targeted 46-year-old women. Five hundred Swedish women were randomly selected from a national population-based register and sent a questionnaire with 18 multiple response questions: the response rate was 47%.
The women used different contraceptive methods during different phases of their reproductive lifecycle. Women mainly used oral contraceptive pills and condoms before pregnancy, copper-IUD between pregnancies and, hormonal- and copper IUD after pregnancy. Condoms were used during all phases of women's fertile period. Women with early sexual debut were more likely to have used condom as their first contraceptive method than women with late sexual debut, and women who had children were more likely to use IUD as current contraception than women without children. High efficacy, accessibility and advice from a counselor were the most cited reasons for choosing a particular method. The most common reasons for discontinuing contraceptive use were a wish to be pregnant and concerns about side effects. The partner had little or no influence on choice of method, but advice from a gynecologist or midwife was influential.
46-year-old women in Sweden had chosen different contraceptive methods during different phases of their reproductive lifecycle. Partners appear to have limited influence over this choice. Individualized counseling by health care providers seems important.
PubMed ID
22325801 View in PubMed
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Early onset of sexual intercourse is an indicator for hazardous lifestyle and problematic life situation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125661
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Mar;27(1):20-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Marlene Makenzius
Margareta Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. marlene.makenzius@fhi.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Mar;27(1):20-6
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Coitus
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Sweden
Abstract
In public health efforts, knowledge about risk-groups is important for creating societal conditions to ensure good health on equal terms.
To investigate differences in lifestyle and perceived health among 15-year-old teenagers with experience of sexual intercourse (self-defined) and same-aged teenagers without experience of sexual intercourse.
A two-cluster questionnaire study among 15-year-old Swedish students (n = 2170) in 2009/10. Chi-squared test was used to identify differences between three groups: teenagers who had not had sexual intercourse; teenagers who had had sexual intercourse at age of 14 or younger; and teenagers who had had intercourse at an age of 15.
Thirty-two per cent (n = 334) of girls and 31% (n = 324) of boys had had sexual intercourse. Teenagers with experience of sexual intercourse at 15 years or younger used more tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs than same-aged teenagers without intercourse experience did. Furthermore, teenagers with experience of intercourse, especially those with a debut at 14 year or younger, had less positive school experiences, more involvement in injuries and physical violence, were less (girls) and more (boys) physically active, and perceived a poorer health than teenagers without intercourse experience.
Sexual intercourse at the age of 15 or younger is an indicator for a hazardous lifestyle and problematic life situation.
PubMed ID
22462801 View in PubMed
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Emergency contraceptive pills in Sweden: evaluation of an information campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63355
Source
BJOG. 2004 Aug;111(8):820-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Margareta Larsson
Karin Eurenius
Ragnar Westerling
Tanja Tydén
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
BJOG. 2004 Aug;111(8):820-7
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Awareness
Comparative Study
Contraceptives, Postcoital - therapeutic use
Emergencies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Mass Media
Pregnancy
Progestins - therapeutic use
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a community-based intervention regarding emergency contraceptive pills, including a mass media campaign and information to women visiting family planning clinics. DESIGN: Quasi-experimental. SETTING: Two counties in Sweden. POPULATION: Eight hundred randomly selected women aged 16-30 years, 400 women in the intervention group and 400 in a comparison group. METHODS: Postal questionnaires before (2002) and after (2003) the intervention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Exposure to the intervention, knowledge, attitudes, practices and intention to use emergency contraceptive pills. RESULTS: Before the intervention, the response rate was 71% (n= 564); after the intervention, the corresponding figure was 83% (n= 467); overall response rate 58%. Two-thirds (64%) of the targeted women had noticed the information campaign. One out of six who had visited a family planning clinic during the intervention year recalled being given information about emergency contraceptive pills. Specific knowledge and attitudes improved over time in both groups, but there was no difference in change between the groups. The proportion of women who had used emergency contraceptive pills increased from 27% to 31% over time. Intention to use emergency contraceptive pills in case of need was reported by 74% of the women and remained stable over time, but logistic regression showed that information during the previous year contributed to willingness to use the method in the intervention group. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge, attitudes and practices about emergency contraceptive pills increased in both groups. Emergency contraceptive pills is gradually becoming a more widely known, accepted and used contraceptive method in Sweden, a trend that may have limited the impact of the intervention.
PubMed ID
15270930 View in PubMed
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60 records – page 1 of 6.