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Post-neonatal mortality among Alaska Native infants, Alaska 1989-2009

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284402
Source
Pages 597-598 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):597-598
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
HEALTHY FAMILIES CQ\C-~ION Post-neonatal mortality among Alaska Native infants, Alaska 1989- 2009a Margaret Young 1* and Bradford D. Gessner2 1Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Anchorage, AK, USA; 2Agence de Medecine Preventive, Paris, France H istorically, Alaska had
  1 document  
Author
Margaret Young
Bradford D. Gessner
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Anchorage, AK, USA
Agence de Medecine Preventive, Paris, France
Source
Pages 597-598 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):597-598
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Abstract
Historically, Alaska had higher post-neonatal mortality rates compared to the United States as a whole, and the rates are even higher among American Indian/Alaska Native infants. Post-neonatal mortality refers to an infant death during 28-364 days of life. During 2006-2008, Alaska's post-neonatal mortality rate of 3.4 deaths per 1,000 live births was 48% higher than the 2007 US rate of 2.3 per 1,000. Among Alaska Native infants, the Alaska rate of 8.0 per 1,000 was 70% higher than the US rate of 4.7. The objective of this study was to examine trends in post-neonatal mortality for Alaska Native and non-Alaska Native infants in Alaska since 1989 and to test whether an observed decline in rates between both groups during the early 1990s had since ended or slowed down.
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Research and policy priorities for addressing prenatal exposure to opioids in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299532
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 Dec; 78(1):1599275
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2019
Author
Rosalyn Singleton
Amanda Slaunwhite
Mary Herrick
Matthew Hirschfeld
Laura Brunner
Christine Hallas
Sarah Truit
Sally Hanson
Margaret Young
Evelyn Rider
Author Affiliation
a Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium , Anchorage , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 Dec; 78(1):1599275
Date
Dec-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The current opioid crisis in Alaska and the USA will negatively affect the health and wellbeing of future generations. The increasing number of infants born with neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS) has had a profound impact on families, health care providers and the child welfare system. This manuscript summarises the main themes of a Symposium held in Anchorage, Alaska with health care providers, researchers, elders and public health officials that focused on identifying emerging challenges, trends and potential solutions to address the increasing number of infants and children affected by maternal opioid use. Five areas of importance for research and policy development that would direct improvement in the care of infants with NOWS in Alaska are outlined with the goal of supporting a research agenda on opioid misuse and child health across the circumpolar north. Abbreviations: NOWS - neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome; NAS - neonatal abstinence syndrome; MAT - medication-assisted treatment; NICU - neonatal intensive care unit; OATs - opioid agonist treatments; OCS - office of children's services; ANTHC - Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium; OUD - opioid use disorder; SBIRT - screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment; ISPCTN - IDeA States Pediatric Clinical Trials Network; NIH - National Institutes of Health; ANMC - Alaska Native Medical Center; DHSS - Department of Health and Social Services; AAPP - All Alaska Pediatric Partnership.
PubMed ID
31020919 View in PubMed
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Vaccine Hesitancy among Mothers of 3-Year-Old Children — Alaska, 2009–2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301030
Source
State of Alaska, Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health. Epidemiology bulletin no.11.
Publication Type
Report
Date
April 22, 2013
Local (907) 269-8000 Anchorage, Alaska 99503 http://www.epi.Alaska.gov 24 Hour Emergency (800) 478-0084 (Contributed by: Margaret Young, MPH, Rebekah Morisse, RN, BSN, MPH, and Marcy Custer, RN, MS, Section of Women’s, Children’s, and Family Health.) http
  1 document  
Author
Margaret Young
Rebekah Morisse
Marcy Custer
Source
State of Alaska, Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health. Epidemiology bulletin no.11.
Date
April 22, 2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
85653
Keywords
Alaska
Vaccines
Children
Alaska Childhood Understanding Behaviors Survey
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