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Acceptability of the POWERPLAY Program: A Workplace Health Promotion Intervention for Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292610
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Nov; 11(6):1809-1822
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Cherisse L Seaton
Joan L Bottorff
John L Oliffe
Margaret Jones-Bricker
Cristina M Caperchione
Steven T Johnson
Paul Sharp
Author Affiliation
1 Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, Canada.
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Nov; 11(6):1809-1822
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Men's health
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workplace
Young Adult
Abstract
The workplace health promotion program, POWERPLAY, was developed, implemented, and comprehensively evaluated among men working in four male-dominated worksites in northern British Columbia, Canada. The purpose of this study was to explore the POWERPLAY program's acceptability and gather recommendations for program refinement. The mixed-method study included end-of-program survey data collected from 103 male POWERPLAY program participants, interviews with workplace leads, and field notes recorded during program implementation. Data analyses involved descriptive statistics for quantitative data and inductive analysis of open-ended questions and qualitative data. Among participants, 70 (69%) reported being satisfied with the program, 51 (51%) perceived the program to be tailored for northern men, 56 (62%) believed the handouts provided useful information, and 75 (74%) would recommend this program to other men. The findings also highlight program implementation experiences with respect to employee engagement, feedback, and recommendations for future delivery. The POWERPLAY program provides an acceptable approach for health promotion that can serve as a model for advancing men's health in other contexts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28884636 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptability of the POWERPLAY Program: A Workplace Health Promotion Intervention for Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285458
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Sep 01;:1557988317728354
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-01-2017
Author
Cherisse L Seaton
Joan L Bottorff
John L Oliffe
Margaret Jones-Bricker
Cristina M Caperchione
Steven T Johnson
Paul Sharp
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Sep 01;:1557988317728354
Date
Sep-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The workplace health promotion program, POWERPLAY, was developed, implemented, and comprehensively evaluated among men working in four male-dominated worksites in northern British Columbia, Canada. The purpose of this study was to explore the POWERPLAY program's acceptability and gather recommendations for program refinement. The mixed-method study included end-of-program survey data collected from 103 male POWERPLAY program participants, interviews with workplace leads, and field notes recorded during program implementation. Data analyses involved descriptive statistics for quantitative data and inductive analysis of open-ended questions and qualitative data. Among participants, 70 (69%) reported being satisfied with the program, 51 (51%) perceived the program to be tailored for northern men, 56 (62%) believed the handouts provided useful information, and 75 (74%) would recommend this program to other men. The findings also highlight program implementation experiences with respect to employee engagement, feedback, and recommendations for future delivery. The POWERPLAY program provides an acceptable approach for health promotion that can serve as a model for advancing men's health in other contexts.
PubMed ID
28884636 View in PubMed
Less detail

Healthy Eating and Active Living: Rural-Based Working Men's Perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268113
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2015 Dec 14;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-14-2015
Author
John L Oliffe
Joan L Bottorff
Paul Sharp
Cristina M Caperchione
Steven T Johnson
Theresa Healy
Sonia Lamont
Margaret Jones-Bricker
Kerensa Medhurst
Sally Errey
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2015 Dec 14;
Date
Dec-14-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
There is a pressing need for health promotion programs focused on increasing healthy eating and active living among "unreached" rural-based men. The purpose of the current study was to describe rural-based working men's views about health to distil acceptable workplace approaches to promoting men's healthy lifestyles. Two focus group interviews included 21 men who worked and lived in northern British Columbia, Canada. Interviews were approximately 2 hours in duration; data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Themes inductively derived included (a) food as quick filling fuels, (b) work strength and recreational exercise, and (c) (re)working masculine health norms. Participants positioned foods as quick filling fuels both at work and home as reflecting time constraints and the need to bolster energy levels. In the theme work strength and recreational exercise, men highlighted the physical labor demands pointing to the need to be resilient in overcoming the subarctic climate and/or work fatigue in order to fit in exercise. In the context of workplace health promotion programs for men, participants advised how clear messaging and linkages between health and work performance and productivity and cultivating friendly competition among male employees were central to reworking, as well as working, with established masculine health norms. Overall, the study findings indicate that the workplace can be an important means to reaching men in rural communities and promoting healthy eating and active living. That said, the development of workplace programs should be guided by strength-based masculine virtues and values that proactively embrace work and family life.
PubMed ID
26669775 View in PubMed
Less detail

Healthy Eating and Active Living: Rural-Based Working Men's Perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292642
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Nov; 11(6):1664-1672
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
John L Oliffe
Joan L Bottorff
Paul Sharp
Cristina M Caperchione
Steven T Johnson
Theresa Healy
Sonia Lamont
Margaret Jones-Bricker
Kerensa Medhurst
Sally Errey
Author Affiliation
1 University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Nov; 11(6):1664-1672
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Exercise
Focus Groups
Health promotion
Health Surveys
Healthy Diet
Humans
Male
Masculinity
Men's health
Middle Aged
Rural Population
Young Adult
Abstract
There is a pressing need for health promotion programs focused on increasing healthy eating and active living among "unreached" rural-based men. The purpose of the current study was to describe rural-based working men's views about health to distil acceptable workplace approaches to promoting men's healthy lifestyles. Two focus group interviews included 21 men who worked and lived in northern British Columbia, Canada. Interviews were approximately 2 hours in duration; data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Themes inductively derived included (a) food as quick filling fuels, (b) work strength and recreational exercise, and (c) (re)working masculine health norms. Participants positioned foods as quick filling fuels both at work and home as reflecting time constraints and the need to bolster energy levels. In the theme work strength and recreational exercise, men highlighted the physical labor demands pointing to the need to be resilient in overcoming the subarctic climate and/or work fatigue in order to fit in exercise. In the context of workplace health promotion programs for men, participants advised how clear messaging and linkages between health and work performance and productivity and cultivating friendly competition among male employees were central to reworking, as well as working, with established masculine health norms. Overall, the study findings indicate that the workplace can be an important means to reaching men in rural communities and promoting healthy eating and active living. That said, the development of workplace programs should be guided by strength-based masculine virtues and values that proactively embrace work and family life.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26669775 View in PubMed
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The POWERPLAY workplace physical activity and nutrition intervention for men: Study protocol and baseline characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264769
Source
Contemp Clin Trials. 2015 Jul 14;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-14-2015
Author
Cristina M Caperchione
Paul Sharp
Joan L Bottorff
Sean Stolp
John L Oliffe
Steven T Johnson
Margaret Jones-Bricker
Sally Errey
Holly Christian
Theresa Healy
Kerensa Medhurst
Sonia Lamont
Source
Contemp Clin Trials. 2015 Jul 14;
Date
Jul-14-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Many health promotion programs hold little "manly" appeal and as a consequence fail to influence men's self-health practices. That said, the workplace can provide an important delivery point for targeted health promotion programs by supporting positive aspects of masculinity. The purpose of this article is to, a) describe the intervention design and study protocol examining the feasibility of a gender-sensitive workplace health promotion intervention focusing on physical activity and healthy eating in male-dominated rural and remote worksites, and b) report baseline findings. This study is a non-randomized quasi-experimental intervention trial examining feasibility and acceptability, and estimated intervention effectiveness. The POWERPLAY program was developed through consultations with men and key workplace personnel, and by drawing on a growing body of men's health promotion research. The program includes masculine print-based messaging, face-to-face education sessions, friendly competition, and self-monitoring concerning physical activity and healthy eating. Male participants (N=139) were recruited from four worksites in northern British Columbia, Canada. Baseline data were collected via computer assisted telephone interview (CATI) survey which assessed physical activity, dietary behavior and workplace environment. This protocol will also be used to collect follow-up data at 6months. A process evaluation, using semi-structured interviews, will be undertaken to assess feasibility and acceptability among participants and worksites. Study outcomes will guide intervention refinement and further testing in a sufficiently powered randomized control trial.
PubMed ID
26187657 View in PubMed
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