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2B or not to be--the 45-year saga of the Montreal Platelet Syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140851
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2010 Nov;104(5):903-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Man-Chiu Poon
Margaret L Rand
Shannon C Jackson
Author Affiliation
Division of Hematology and Hematologic Malignancies, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. mcpoon@ucalgary.ca
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2010 Nov;104(5):903-10
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Coagulation - genetics
Blood Coagulation Tests - history
Blood Platelet Disorders - blood - genetics - history
Blood Platelets - metabolism - pathology
Canada
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
History, 20th Century
Humans
Mutation
Pedigree
Phenotype
Platelet Function Tests - history
Syndrome
von Willebrand Disease, Type 2 - blood - genetics - history
von Willebrand Factor - genetics - history
Abstract
Over 45 years ago, Montreal Platelet Syndrome was first described as a rare inherited platelet disorder characterised by macrothrombocytopenia with spontaneous platelet clumping, abnormal platelet shape change upon stimulation and a defect in platelet calpain. This syndrome has now been reclassified as type 2B von Willebrand disease with the V1316M VWF mutation in the only kindred ever reported. We herein revisit the historical platelet characteristics originally described in Montreal Platelet Syndrome in light of the new diagnosis. This paper will review the 45-year saga of Montreal Platelet Syndrome, a story that highlights the value of revisiting a rare diagnosis to look for a more common explanation.
PubMed ID
20838735 View in PubMed
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Hereditary angiodema: a current state-of-the-art review, VII: Canadian Hungarian 2007 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159145
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2008 Jan;100(1 Suppl 2):S30-40
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Tom Bowen
Marco Cicardi
Konrad Bork
Bruce Zuraw
Mike Frank
Bruce Ritchie
Henriette Farkas
Lilian Varga
Lorenza C Zingale
Karen Binkley
Eric Wagner
Peggy Adomaitis
Kristylea Brosz
Jeanne Burnham
Richard Warrington
Chrystyna Kalicinsky
Sean Mace
Christine McCusker
Robert Schellenberg
Lucia Celeste
Jacques Hebert
Karen Valentine
Man-Chiu Poon
Bazir Serushago
Doris Neurath
William Yang
Gina Lacuesta
Andrew Issekutz
Azza Hamed
Palinder Kamra
John Dean
Amin Kanani
Donald Stark
Georges-Etienne Rivard
Eric Leith
Ellie Tsai
Susan Waserman
Paul K Keith
David Page
Silvia Marchesin
Hilary J Longhurst
Wolfhart Kreuz
Eva Rusicke
Inmaculada Martinez-Saguer
Emel Aygören-Pürsün
George Harmat
George Füst
Henry Li
Laurence Bouillet
Teresa Caballero
Dumitru Moldovan
Peter J Späth
Sara Smith-Foltz
Istvan Nagy
Erik W Nielsen
Christoph Bucher
Patrik Nordenfelt
Zhi Yu Xiang
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. tbowen@pol.net
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2008 Jan;100(1 Suppl 2):S30-40
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Angioedemas, Hereditary - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Canada
Consensus Development Conferences as Topic
Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic - methods - standards
Humans
Hungary
International Cooperation
Abstract
We published the Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE; C1 inhibitor [C1-INH] deficiency) in 2004.
To ensure that this consensus remains current.
In collaboration with the Canadian Network of Rare Blood Disorder Organizations, we held the second Canadian Consensus discussion with our international colleagues in Toronto, Ontario, on February 3, 2006, and reviewed its content at the Fifth C1 Inhibitor Deficiency Workshop in Budapest on June 2, 2007. Papers were presented by international investigators, and this consensus algorithm approach resulted.
This consensus algorithm outlines the approach recommended for the diagnosis, therapy, and management of HAE, which was agreed on by the authors of this report. This document is only a consensus algorithm approach and continues to require validation. As such, participants agreed to make this a living 2007 algorithm, a work in progress, and to review its content at future international HAE meetings.
There is a paucity of double-blind, placebo-controlled trials on the treatment of HAE, making levels of evidence to support the algorithm less than optimal. Controlled trials currently under way will provide further insight into the management of HAE. As with our Canadian 2003 Consensus, this 2007 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of HAE was formed through the meeting and agreement of patient care professionals along with patient group representatives and individual patients.
PubMed ID
18220150 View in PubMed
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Long term platelet responses to Helicobacter pylori eradication in Canadian patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155904
Source
Int J Hematol. 2008 Sep;88(2):212-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Shannon C Jackson
Paul Beck
Andre G Buret
Pamela M O'Connor
Jonathan Meddings
Graham Pineo
Man-Chiu Poon
Author Affiliation
Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403-29th Street N.W., Calgary, AB, T2N 2T9, Canada. sjackso@ucalgary.ca
Source
Int J Hematol. 2008 Sep;88(2):212-8
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Antigens, Bacterial - blood - immunology
Blood Platelets - immunology
Canada
Female
Helicobacter Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - immunology
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic - epidemiology - immunology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Stomach - microbiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This prospective Canadian pilot study assesses the platelet response rate in H. pylori positive and negative patients and evaluates potential mechanisms to explain response. Patients with ITP received H. pylori eradication therapy and platelet counts at day 56 were used to assess response. Gastric permeability, stool H. pylori antigen and serum CagA anti-body were done at baseline and at day 60. Twenty-two patients were enrolled with an overall response rate of 27% (6/22). The prevalence of H. pylori was 18% (4/22). Seventy-five percent of the H. pylori positive patients (3/4) achieved a response compared to 17% (3/18) of the H. pylori negative patients (P
PubMed ID
18668306 View in PubMed
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Recombinant factor IX recovery and inhibitor safety: a Canadian post-licensure surveillance study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190838
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2002 Mar;87(3):431-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Man-Chiu Poon
David Lillicrap
Caroline Hensman
Robert Card
Mary-Frances Scully
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. mcpoon@ucalgary.ca
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2002 Mar;87(3):431-5
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anaphylaxis - etiology
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Consumer Product Safety
Factor IX - immunology - pharmacokinetics - standards
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Isoantibodies - blood
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing
Recombinant Proteins - immunology - pharmacokinetics - standards
Abstract
As part of the Canadian post-licensure surveillance on the safety of recombinant factor IX (rFIX. BeneFIX), factor IX recovery and inhibitor development were studied. The recovery following rFIX infusion in 126 patients (mean = 0.77, median 0.72, range 0.36-1.85, 95% CI of mean 0.74-0.81, expressed as FIX activity increase in U/dL per IU FIX concentrate/kg body weight infused) was significantly lower than that following the last plasma-derived factor IX (pdFIX) infusion in 74 patients (mean 1.05, median 1.00, range 0.37-2.29, 95% CI of mean 0.99-0.97). The recovery for rFIX for patients aged 15 years (n = 85, mean 0.84) was each significantly lower than that for pdFIX (aged 15 years: n = 53, mean recovery 1.10). For both rFIX and pdFIX concentrates, the recovery was lower in patients 15 years of age. Similar data and conclusions were obtained on 66 patients with paired recovery data from rFIX and pdFIX. Overall, our data are similar to those obtained in formal clinical trials. Two of 244 patients treated with rFIX for up to 5 years have developed de novo inhibitors associated with anaphylaxis, an incidence that is similar to that reported for pdFIX. No other serious adverse events, including thrombotic episodes, were reported. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first formal report of recovery and inhibitor formation on rFIX in a peer-reviewed manuscript form.
PubMed ID
11916075 View in PubMed
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Stroke prenotification is associated with shorter treatment times for warfarin-associated intracerebral hemorrhage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257225
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2013;36(5-6):383-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Dar Dowlatshahi
Jason K Wasserman
Ken S Butcher
Manya L Bernbaum
A Adam Cwinn
Antonio Giulivi
Eddy Lang
Man-Chiu Poon
Jessica Tomchishen-Pope
Mukul Sharma
Shelagh B Coutts
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of Ottawa and Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont., Canada.
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2013;36(5-6):383-7
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - adverse effects
Brain Ischemia - diagnosis - etiology
Canada
Cerebral Hemorrhage - chemically induced - complications - therapy
Female
Humans
International Normalized Ratio
Male
Middle Aged
Stroke - diagnosis - etiology
Thrombolytic Therapy - methods
Time Factors
Warfarin - adverse effects
Abstract
Warfarin-associated intracerebral hemorrhage (WAICH) is a devastating disease with increasing incidence. In this setting, treatment with prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) is essential to correct coagulopathy. Yet despite the availability of coagulopathy correction strategies, significant treatment delays can occur in emergency departments (EDs), which may be overcome using stroke prenotification strategies. To explore this, we compared arrival-to-treatment times with PCC for WAICH between two different stroke response systems that used the same international normalized ratio (INR) correction protocol.
We established a registry of consecutive patients presenting with WAICH and treated with PCC presenting to two Canadian tertiary-care academic stroke centers: one with a stroke prenotification system, and one with a traditional ED assessment, treatment and referral system. In this comparative cohort design, we defined the WAICH diagnosis time as the earliest time point where both INR and CT were available. We compared median times from arrival to treatment, as well as arrival to diagnosis, and diagnosis to treatment.
Between 2008 and 2010, we collected data from 123 consecutive patients with intracranial hemorrhage who received PCC for INR correction (79 from ED referral, and 44 prenotification). Onset-to-arrival times, demographics, Glasgow Coma Scale scores, and baseline INR were similar between the two systems. Arrival-to-treatment times were significantly shorter in the prenotification system as compared to the traditional ED referral system (135 vs. 267 min; p = 0.001), which was driven by both decreased arrival-to-diagnosis time (49 vs. 117 min; p = 0.006), as well as decreased diagnosis-to-treatment time (56 vs. 112 min; p
PubMed ID
24248034 View in PubMed
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