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Can we trust cross-sectional studies when studying the risk of moisture-related problems indoor for asthma in children?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101510
Source
Int J Environ Health Res. 2011 Aug;21(4):237-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Malin Larsson
Linda Hägerhed-Engman
Syed Moniruzzaman
Staffan Janson
Jan Sundell
Carl-Gustaf Bornehag
Author Affiliation
a Public Health Sciences , Karlstad University , Karlstad , Sweden.
Source
Int J Environ Health Res. 2011 Aug;21(4):237-47
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Most studies studying dampness as a risk factor for asthma are of a cross-sectional design. The aim of this study was to investigate if the association between moisture-related problems indoor and asthma found in cross-sectional questionnaire data can be confirmed in longitudinal analyses. The Dampness in Building and Health (DBH) study started in 2000 in Värmland, Sweden, with a baseline questionnaire to all children aged 1-5 y (n = 14,077) and five years later a follow-up questionnaire was distributed to children aged 6-8 y (n = 7,509). Moisture-related problems that were associated with asthma in cross-sectional analysis decreased or disappeared in the longitudinal analysis. However, the association between reports of moldy odor in the homes at baseline and incident asthma remained and became stronger. Our results suggest that cross-sectional data showing associations between moisture-related problems in homes and asthma in children partly can be explained by reporting bias.
PubMed ID
21745019 View in PubMed
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Eczema in early childhood is strongly associated with the development of asthma and rhinitis in a prospective cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122180
Source
BMC Dermatol. 2012;12:11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Laura B von Kobyletzki
Carl-Gustaf Bornehag
Mikael Hasselgren
Malin Larsson
Cecilia Boman Lindström
Åke Svensson
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Institute of Clinical Research in Malmö, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. laura.vonkobyletzki@liv.se
Source
BMC Dermatol. 2012;12:11
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Asthma - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Eczema - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Rhinitis - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study aimed to estimate the association between eczema in early childhood and the onset of asthma and rhinitis later in life in children.
A total of 3,124 children aged 1-2?years were included in the Dampness in Building and Health (DBH) study in the year 2000, and followed up 5?years later by a parental questionnaire based on an International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood protocol. The association between eczema in early childhood and the incidence of asthma and rhinitis later in life was estimated by univariable and multivariable logistic regression modelling.
The prevalence of eczema in children aged 1-2?years was 17.6% at baseline. Children with eczema had a 3-fold increased odds of developing asthma (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 3.07; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.79-5.27), and a nearly 3-fold increased odds of developing rhinitis (aOR, 2.63; 1.85-3.73) at follow-up compared with children without eczema, adjusted for age, sex, parental allergic disease, parental smoking, length of breastfeeding, site of living, polyvinylchloride flooring material, and concomitant allergic disease. When eczema was divided into subgroups, moderate to severe eczema (aOR, 3.56; 1.62-7.83 and aOR, 3.87; 2.37-6.33, respectively), early onset of eczema (aOR, 3.44; 1.94-6.09 and aOR, 4.05; 2.82-5.81; respectively), and persistence of eczema (aOR, 5.16; 2.62-10.18 and aOR, 4.00; 2.53-6.22, respectively) further increased the odds of developing asthma and rhinitis. Further independent risk factors increasing the odds of developing asthma were a parental history of allergic disease (aOR, 1.83; 1.29-2.60) and a period of breast feeding shorter than 6?months (aOR, 1.57; 1.03-2.39). The incidence of rhinitis was increased for parental history of allergic disease (aOR, 2.00; 1.59-2.51) and polyvinylchloride flooring (aOR, 1.60; 1.02-2.51).
Eczema in infancy is associated with development of asthma and rhinitis during the following 5-year period, and eczema is one of the strongest risk factors. Early identification is valuable for prediction of the atopic march.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22839963 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with remission of eczema in children: a population-based follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107249
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2014 Mar;94(2):179-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Laura B von Kobyletzki
Carl-Gustaf Bornehag
Elizabeth Breeze
Malin Larsson
Cecilia Boman Lindström
Åke Svensson
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, SE-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. laura.von_kobyletzki@med.lu.se, Laura.vonKobyletzki@liv.se.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2014 Mar;94(2):179-84
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyse factors associated with remission of atopic dermatitis (AD) in childhood. A population-based AD cohort of 894 children aged 1-3 years from a cross-sectional baseline study in 2000 was followed up in 2005. The association between remission, background, health, lifestyle, and environmental variables was estimated with crude and multivariable logistic regression. At follow-up, 52% of the children had remission. Independent factors at baseline predicting remission were: milder eczema (adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 1.43; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.16-1.77); later onset of eczema (aOR 1.40; 95% CI 1.08-1.80); non-flexural eczema (aOR 2.57; 95% CI 1.62-4.09); no food allergy (aOR 1.51; 95% CI 1.11-2.04), and rural living (aOR 1.48; 95% CI 1.07-2.05). Certain aspects of AD and rural living were important for remission, but despite the initial hypotheses to the contrary, the environmental factors examined in this paper were not substantial predictors of remission.
PubMed ID
24037118 View in PubMed
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The SELMA study: a birth cohort study in Sweden following more than 2000 mother-child pairs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121724
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2012 Sep;26(5):456-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Carl-Gustaf Bornehag
Syed Moniruzzaman
Malin Larsson
Cecilia Boman Lindström
Mikael Hasselgren
Anna Bodin
Laura B von Kobyletzkic
Fredrik Carlstedt
Fredrik Lundin
Eewa Nånberg
Bo A G Jönsson
Torben Sigsgaard
Staffan Janson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University, Sweden. carl-gustaf.bornehag@kau.se
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2012 Sep;26(5):456-67
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Life Style
Mothers
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Selection Bias
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Sweden
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper describes the background, aim and study design for the Swedish SELMA study that aimed to investigate the importance of early life exposure during pregnancy and infancy to environmental factors with a major focus on endocrine disrupting chemicals for multiple chronic diseases/disorders in offspring.
The cohort was established by recruiting women in the 10th week of pregnancy. Blood and urine from the pregnant women and the child and air and dust from home environment from pregnancy and infancy period have been collected. Questionnaires were used to collect information on life styles, socio-economic status, living conditions, diet and medical history.
Of the 8394 reported pregnant women, 6658 were invited to participate in the study. Among the invited women, 2582 (39%) agreed to participate. Of the 4076 (61%) non-participants, 2091 women were invited to a non-respondent questionnaire in order to examine possible selection bias. We found a self-selection bias in the established cohort when compared with the non-participant group, e.g. participating families did smoke less (14% vs. 19%), had more frequent asthma and allergy symptoms in the family (58% vs. 38%), as well as higher education among the mothers (51% vs. 36%) and more often lived in single-family houses (67% vs. 60%).
These findings indicate that the participating families do not fully represent the study population and thus, the exposure in this population. However, there is no obvious reason that this selection bias will have an impact on identification of environmental risk factors.
PubMed ID
22882790 View in PubMed
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