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Distribution and abundance of surface water microlitter in the Baltic Sea: A comparison of two sampling methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282663
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2016 Sep 15;110(1):177-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2016
Author
Outi Setälä
Kerstin Magnusson
Maiju Lehtiniemi
Fredrik Norén
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2016 Sep 15;110(1):177-83
Date
Sep-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
North Sea
Seawater
Waste Products
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Two methods for marine microlitter sampling were compared in the Gulf of Finland, northern Baltic Sea: manta trawl (333µm) and a submersible pump (300 or 100µm). Concentrations of microlitter (microplastics, combustion particles, non-synthetic fibres) in the samples collected with both methods and filter sizes remained
PubMed ID
27339742 View in PubMed
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Effective and easy to use extraction method shows low numbers of microplastics in offshore planktivorous fish from the northern Baltic Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293448
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Feb; 127:586-592
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2018
Author
Stjepan Budimir
Outi Setälä
Maiju Lehtiniemi
Author Affiliation
Finnish Environment Institute, Marine Research Centre, P.O. Box 140, 00251 Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: s.budimir.marbio@gmail.com.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Feb; 127:586-592
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Chemical Fractionation - methods
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Fishes
Gastrointestinal Contents - chemistry
Oceans and Seas
Plastics - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Although the presence of microplastics in marine biota has been widely recorded, extraction methods, method validation and approaches to monitoring are not standardized. In this study a method for microplastic extraction from fish guts based on a chemical alkaline digestion is presented. The average particle retrieval rate from spiked fish guts, used for method validation, was 84%. The weight and shape of the test particles (PET, PC, HD-PE) were also analysed with no noticeable changes in any particle shapes and only minor weight change in PET (2.63%). Microplastics were found in 1.8% of herrings (n=164) and in 0.9% of sprat (n=154). None of the three-spined sticklebacks (n=355) contained microplastic particles.
PubMed ID
29475701 View in PubMed
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Monitoring of sessile and mobile epifauna - Considerations for non-indigenous species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300125
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2019 Apr; 141:332-342
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Okko Outinen
Tiia Forsström
Juho Yli-Rosti
Outi Vesakoski
Maiju Lehtiniemi
Author Affiliation
Marine Research Centre, Finnish Environment Institute, Latokartanonkaari 11, 00790 Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: okko.outinen@ymparisto.fi.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2019 Apr; 141:332-342
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Aquatic Organisms - isolation & purification
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Introduced species
Oceans and Seas
Abstract
The present study aimed to develop monitoring methods for shallow water sessile and mobile epifauna with the main focus on enhancing the chance of early detection for new non-indigenous species (NIS) invasions. The field sampling was conducted between June and September in 2012, in the Archipelago Sea (Finland). The tested monitoring methods included baited traps that capture organisms and habitat collectors that provide habitat and refuges for organisms, as well as fouling plates. Catch efficiency of a trap/collector was defined as the number of NIS and all species caught, including their abundances. The American collector with oyster shells (habitat collector) caught the highest number of NIS, and their use is recommended in all places, where oyster shells are easily accessible. Sampling of all habitats of interest between 1 and 2?m depth is recommended with at least three habitat collectors per site.
PubMed ID
30955741 View in PubMed
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Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon sorption and bacterial community composition of biodegradable and conventional plastics incubated in coastal sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304305
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2021 Feb 10; 755(Pt 2):143088
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-10-2021
Author
Pinja Näkki
Eeva Eronen-Rasimus
Hermanni Kaartokallio
Harri Kankaanpää
Outi Setälä
Emil Vahtera
Maiju Lehtiniemi
Author Affiliation
Tvärminne Zoological Station, University of Helsinki, J.A. Palménin tie 260, FI-10900 Hanko, Finland; Marine Research Centre, Finnish Environment Institute, Latokartanonkaari 11, FI-00790 Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: pinja.nakki@helsinki.fi.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2021 Feb 10; 755(Pt 2):143088
Date
Feb-10-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Ecosystem
Finland
Geologic sediments
Plastics
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis
Seawater
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Resistant to degradation, plastic litter poses a long-term threat to marine ecosystems. Biodegradable materials have been developed to replace conventional plastics, but little is known of their impacts and degradation in marine environments. A 14-week laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to conventional (polystyrene PS and polyamide PA) and bio-based, biodegradable plastic films (cellulose acetate CA and poly-L-lactic acid PLLA), and to examine the composition of bacterial communities colonizing these materials. Mesoplastics (1?cm2) of these materials were incubated in sediment and seawater collected from two sites in the Gulf of Finland, on the coast of the highly urbanized area of Helsinki, Finland. PS sorbed more PAHs than did the other plastic types at both sites, and the concentration of PAHs was consistently and considerably smaller in plastics than in the sediment. In general, the plastic bacterial biofilms resembled those in the surrounding media (water and/or sediment). However, in the sediment incubations, the community composition on CA diverged from that of the other three plastic types and was enriched with Bacteroidia and potentially cellulolytic Spirochaetia at both sites. The results indicate that certain biodegradable plastics, such as CA, may harbour potential bioplastic-degrading communities and that PAH sorption capacity varies between polymer types. Since biodegradable plastics are presented as replacements for conventional plastics in applications with risk of ending up in the marine environment, the results highlight the need to carefully examine the environmental behaviour of each biodegradable plastic type before they are extensively introduced to the market.
PubMed ID
33127152 View in PubMed
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