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Baby swimming and respiratory health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93355
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2008 May;97(5):657-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Nystad Wenche
Håberg Siri E
London Stephanie J
Nafstad Per
Magnus Per
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. wenche.nystad@fhi.no
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2008 May;97(5):657-62
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Maternal Behavior
Norway - epidemiology
Otitis Media - etiology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
Risk factors
Seasons
Smoking - epidemiology
Swimming
Abstract
AIM: To estimate the effect of baby swimming in the first 6 months of life on respiratory diseases from 6 to 18 months. METHODS: We used data from The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in children born between 1999 and 2005 followed from birth to the age of 18 months (n = 30,870). Health outcomes: lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), wheeze and otitis media between 6 and 18 months of age. Exposure: baby swimming at the age of 6 months. The effect of baby swimming was estimated by logistic regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: About 25% of the children participated in baby swimming. The prevalence of LRTI was 13.3%, wheeze 40.0% and otitis media 30.4%. Children who were baby swimming were not more likely to have LRTI, to wheeze or to have otitis media. However, children with atopic mothers who attended baby swimming had an increased risk of wheeze, adjusted odds ratios (aOR) 1.24 (95% CI 1.11, 1.39), but not LRTI or otitis media. This was also the case for children without respiratory diseases before 6 months aOR 1.08 (95%CI 1.02-1.15). CONCLUSION: Baby swimming may be related to later wheeze. However, these findings warrant further investigation.
PubMed ID
18394113 View in PubMed
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The biobank of the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study: a resource for the next 100 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80275
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(8):619-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Rønningen Kjersti S
Paltiel Liv
Meltzer Helle M
Nordhagen Rannveig
Lie Kari K
Hovengen Ragnhild
Haugen Margaretha
Nystad Wenche
Magnus Per
Hoppin Jane A
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo, Norway. kjersti.skjold.ronningen@fhi.no
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(8):619-25
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Automation
Biological Specimen Banks - standards
Blood Banks
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Cryopreservation
DNA - isolation & purification
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Mothers
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Quality Control
Specimen Handling
Temperature
Urine
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Long-term storage of biological materials is a critical component of any epidemiological study. In designing specimen repositories, efforts need to balance future needs for samples with logistical constraints necessary to process and store samples in a timely fashion. OBJECTIVES: In the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), the Biobank was charged with long-term storage of more than 380,000 biological samples from pregnant women, their partners and their children for up to 100 years. METHODS: Biological specimens include whole blood, plasma, DNA and urine; samples are collected at 50 hospitals in Norway. All samples are sent via ordinary mail to the Biobank in Oslo where the samples are registered, aliquoted and DNA extracted. DNA is stored at -20 degrees C while whole blood, urine and plasma are stored at -80 degrees C. RESULTS: As of July 2006, over 227,000 sample sets have been collected, processed and stored at the Biobank. Currently 250-300 sets are received daily. An important part of the Biobank is the quality control program. CONCLUSION: With the unique combination of biological specimens and questionnaire data, the MoBa Study will constitute a resource for many future investigations of the separate and combined effects of genetic, environmental factors on pregnancy outcome and on human morbidity, mortality and health in general.
PubMed ID
17031521 View in PubMed
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Cohort profile: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80984
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Oct;35(5):1146-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006

Decrease in consanguinity among parents of children born in Norway to women of Pakistani origin: A registry-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90449
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 May;37(3):232-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Grjibovski Andrej M
Magnus Per
Stoltenberg Camilla
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. andrei.grjibovski@fhi.no.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 May;37(3):232-8
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
AIMS: To describe the prevalence of consanguinity among Norwegian Pakistani parents in the period from 1995 to 2005. METHODS: All first births to women of Pakistani origin in 1995-2005 (n = 1962) were identified by linking the Medical Birth Registry of Norway with information on country of origin and country of birth from Statistics Norway. Prevalence ratios (PRs) and prevalence differences were calculated by multiple binomial regression analyses with adjustment for maternal age and education. Women born in Pakistan who gave birth in Norway in 1995-97 formed the reference group. RESULTS: The proportion of women who were consanguineously related to their co-parent decreased from 45.5% in 1995-97 to 27.3% in 2002-2005 among those who were born in Pakistan, and from 48.3% to 18.8% among women of Pakistani origin who were born in Norway. The proportion of women who were related to their co-parent as first cousin decreased from 37.7% to 24.7% among women born in Pakistan, and from 43.3% to 16.7% among women of Pakistani origin who were born in Norway. The proportion of births to women with an unrelated co-parent increased by 25% for women born in Pakistan (PR = 1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.12-1.39), and by 53% for women of Pakistani origin born in Norway (PR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.35-1.74). CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to previous reports from the UK, our analysis suggests that there is a decrease in the proportion of consanguineously related parents of children born to women of Pakistani origin in Norway.
PubMed ID
19141547 View in PubMed
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A dietary pattern characterized by high intake of vegetables, fruits, and vegetable oils is associated with reduced risk of preeclampsia in nulliparous pregnant Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89320
Source
J Nutr. 2009 Jun;139(6):1162-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Brantsaeter Anne Lise
Haugen Margaretha
Samuelsen Sven Ove
Torjusen Hanne
Trogstad Lill
Alexander Jan
Magnus Per
Meltzer Helle Margrete
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway. anne.lise.brantsaeter@fhi.no
Source
J Nutr. 2009 Jun;139(6):1162-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Parity
Plant Oils
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
Several dietary substances have been hypothesized to influence the risk of preeclampsia. Our aim in this study was to estimate the association between dietary patterns during pregnancy and the risk of preeclampsia in 23,423 nulliparous pregnant women taking part in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Women participating in MoBa answered questionnaires at gestational wk 15 (a general health questionnaire) and 17-22 (a FFQ). The pregnancy outcomes were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Exploratory factor analysis was used to assess the associations among food variables. Principal component factor analysis identified 4 primary dietary patterns that were labeled: vegetable, processed food, potato and fish, and cakes and sweets. Relative risks of preeclampsia were estimated as odds ratios (OR) and confounder control was performed with multiple logistic regression. Women with high scores on a pattern characterized by vegetables, plant foods, and vegetable oils were at decreased risk [relative risk (OR) for tertile 3 vs. tertile 1: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.62, 0.85]. Women with high scores on a pattern characterized by processed meat, salty snacks, and sweet drinks were at increased risk [OR for tertile 3 vs. tertile 1: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.42]. These findings suggest that a dietary pattern characterized by high intake of vegetables, plant foods, and vegetable oils decreases the risk of preeclampsia, whereas a dietary pattern characterized by high consumption of processed meat, sweet drinks, and salty snacks increases the risk.
PubMed ID
19369368 View in PubMed
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[Environmental causes of type 1 diabetes]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94008
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 Sep 20;127(18):2405-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-2007
Author
Rønningen Kjersti Skjold
Stene Lars Chr
Rasmussen Trond
Wetlesen Turid
Magnus Per
Author Affiliation
Divisjon for epidemiologi, Nasjonalt folkehelseinstitutt, Postboks 4404 Nydalen, 0403 Oslo. kjersti.skjold.ronningen@fhi.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 Sep 20;127(18):2405-8
Date
Sep-20-2007
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - etiology - genetics - prevention & control
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Screening
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Norway is among the countries with the highest prevalence of type 1-diabetes, and the incidence is increasing. Both environmental- and genetic factors contribute to development of the disease; but no environmental risk factor for type 1-diabetes has been identified, and it is therefore difficult to prevent the disease. In the prospective research study MIDIA (Norwegian acronym for Environmental triggers of type 1-diabetes) 100,000 new-borns will be tested for a gene combination that approximately 2.1% of the children have. Each of the 2,100 children with this combination have a 6-10% risk for childhood diabetes. They will be followed for up for 15 years with regular stool samples, questionnaires and blood samples with the aim of finding causes of diabetes. Detection of autoantibodies towards beta cells in the pancreas indicates an ongoing disease process and will be used as the first end-point. The aim of this article is to inform Norwegian doctors about the study, and to discuss scientific and ethical aspects of the project.
PubMed ID
17895949 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology and heritability of astigmatism in Norwegian twins: an analysis of self-reported data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81279
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;13(4):245-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Grjibovski Andrej M
Magnus Per
Midelfart Anna
Harris Jennifer R
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Nydalen, Oslo, Norway. andrei.grjibovski@fhi.no
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;13(4):245-52
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Astigmatism - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Diseases in Twins
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Twins
Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe the occurrence and heritability of astigmatism in a population-based sample of Norwegian twins. METHODS: Self-reported history of astigmatism based on questionnaire responses was used to estimate the prevalence and incidence rates of astigmatism from birth through 31 years in 8,045 twins. Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-binomial regression were used to study the conditional and relative risk of astigmatism in twin pairs by sex and zygosity. Tetrachoric correlations and structural equation models were applied to estimate the genetic and environmental sources of variations in liability for astigmatism. RESULTS: Altogether 21.1% of males and 29.3% of females (p
PubMed ID
16877283 View in PubMed
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Genetics and gene-environment interactions in atopic diseases. The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87519
Source
Hum Hered. 2008;65(4):195-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Håberg Siri E
Nafstad Per
Nystad Wenche
Magnus Per
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. siri.haberg@fhi.no
Source
Hum Hered. 2008;65(4):195-8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure
Fathers
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Infant
Male
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) aims to provide new insights in a broad variety of diseases. The goal of the study is to understand pathways in disease development, and identify preventive measures. Several designs are suitable for studying genetics in complex diseases like asthma and allergy, in MoBa. METHODS: MoBa is a prospective population based cohort of 100 000 pregnancies, following offspring into adulthood. Enrollment started in 1999, and will be completed in 2008. A biobank with samples from the mother, father and child, together with detailed questionnaires from early pregnancy and childhood constitute the basis of the study. When studying complex diseases like asthma, a design with case-parent triads is useful. Parental effects and interactions between maternal and fetal genes can be detected. Stratifying triads by environmental exposure enables assessment of gene-environment interactions. RESULTS: By July 2006, more than 73,000 pregnancies have been included, with nearly 7,000 siblings and 1,300 pairs of twins enrolled. Biological samples are processed and stored at the biobank. The first children are reaching age seven in 2006. CONCLUSION: The MoBa cohort provides an excellent basis for studying genetic, epigenetic and environmental influences on complex diseases.
PubMed ID
18073489 View in PubMed
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Incidence rates of progressive childhood encephalopathy in Oslo, Norway: a population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77317
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2007;7:25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Stromme Petter
Kanavin Oivind Juris
Abdelnoor Michael
Woldseth Berit
Rootwelt Terje
Diderichsen Jorgen
Bjurulf Bjorn
Sommer Finn
Magnus Per
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Ullevål University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. petter.stromme@medisin.uio.no
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2007;7:25
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Progressive encephalopathy (PE) in children is a heterogeneous group of diseases mainly composed of metabolic diseases, but it consists also of neurodegenerative disorders where neither metabolic nor other causes are found. We wanted to estimate the incidence rate and aetiology of PE, as well as the age of onset of the disease. METHODS: We included PE cases born between 1985 and 2003, living in Oslo, and registered the number presenting annually between 1985 and 2004. Person-years at risk between 0 and 15 years were based on the number of live births during the observation period which was divided into four 5-year intervals. We calculated incidence rates according to age at onset which was classified as neonatal (0-4 weeks), infantile (1-12 months), late infantile (1-5 years), and juvenile (6-12 years). RESULTS: We found 84 PE cases representing 28 diagnoses among 1,305,997 person years, giving an incidence rate of 6.43 per 100,000 person years. The age-specific incidence rates per 100,000 were: 79.89 (5 years). 66% (55/84) of the cases were metabolic, 32% (27/54) were neurodegenerative, and 2% (2/84) had HIV encephalopathy. 71% (60/84) of the cases presented at
PubMed ID
17597517 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.