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Climate-driven changes in functional biogeography of Arctic marine fish communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286820
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 Oct 31;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-31-2017
Author
André Frainer
Raul Primicerio
Susanne Kortsch
Magnus Aune
Andrey V Dolgov
Maria Fossheim
Michaela M Aschan
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 Oct 31;
Date
Oct-31-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Climate change triggers poleward shifts in species distribution leading to changes in biogeography. In the marine environment, fish respond quickly to warming, causing community-wide reorganizations, which result in profound changes in ecosystem functioning. Functional biogeography provides a framework to address how ecosystem functioning may be affected by climate change over large spatial scales. However, there are few studies on functional biogeography in the marine environment, and none in the Arctic, where climate-driven changes are most rapid and extensive. We investigated the impact of climate warming on the functional biogeography of the Barents Sea, which is characterized by a sharp zoogeographic divide separating boreal from Arctic species. Our unique dataset covered 52 fish species, 15 functional traits, and 3,660 stations sampled during the recent warming period. We found that the functional traits characterizing Arctic fish communities, mainly composed of small-sized bottom-dwelling benthivores, are being rapidly replaced by traits of incoming boreal species, particularly the larger, longer lived, and more piscivorous species. The changes in functional traits detected in the Arctic can be predicted based on the characteristics of species expected to undergo quick poleward shifts in response to warming. These are the large, generalist, motile species, such as cod and haddock. We show how functional biogeography can provide important insights into the relationship between species composition, diversity, ecosystem functioning, and environmental drivers. This represents invaluable knowledge in a period when communities and ecosystems experience rapid climate-driven changes across biogeographical regions.
PubMed ID
29087943 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate-driven changes in functional biogeography of Arctic marine fish communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292472
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 11 14; 114(46):12202-12207
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-14-2017
Author
André Frainer
Raul Primicerio
Susanne Kortsch
Magnus Aune
Andrey V Dolgov
Maria Fossheim
Michaela M Aschan
Author Affiliation
Norwegian College of Fishery Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromsø, Norway; andre.frainer@uit.no.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 11 14; 114(46):12202-12207
Date
11-14-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adaptation, Biological
Animal Distribution
Animals
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Ecosystem
Fishes - physiology
Models, Statistical
Temperature
Abstract
Climate change triggers poleward shifts in species distribution leading to changes in biogeography. In the marine environment, fish respond quickly to warming, causing community-wide reorganizations, which result in profound changes in ecosystem functioning. Functional biogeography provides a framework to address how ecosystem functioning may be affected by climate change over large spatial scales. However, there are few studies on functional biogeography in the marine environment, and none in the Arctic, where climate-driven changes are most rapid and extensive. We investigated the impact of climate warming on the functional biogeography of the Barents Sea, which is characterized by a sharp zoogeographic divide separating boreal from Arctic species. Our unique dataset covered 52 fish species, 15 functional traits, and 3,660 stations sampled during the recent warming period. We found that the functional traits characterizing Arctic fish communities, mainly composed of small-sized bottom-dwelling benthivores, are being rapidly replaced by traits of incoming boreal species, particularly the larger, longer lived, and more piscivorous species. The changes in functional traits detected in the Arctic can be predicted based on the characteristics of species expected to undergo quick poleward shifts in response to warming. These are the large, generalist, motile species, such as cod and haddock. We show how functional biogeography can provide important insights into the relationship between species composition, diversity, ecosystem functioning, and environmental drivers. This represents invaluable knowledge in a period when communities and ecosystems experience rapid climate-driven changes across biogeographical regions.
Notes
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CommentIn: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 Nov 14;114(46):12100-12102 PMID 29093162
PubMed ID
29087943 View in PubMed
Less detail

Distribution and ecology of polar cod (Boreogadus saida) in the eastern Barents Sea: A review of historical literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311719
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2021 Apr; 166:105262
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Apr-2021
Author
Magnus Aune
Evgeniia Raskhozheva
Hector Andrade
Starrlight Augustine
Alexei Bambulyak
Lionel Camus
JoLynn Carroll
Andrey V Dolgov
Haakon Hop
Denis Moiseev
Paul E Renaud
Øystein Varpe
Author Affiliation
Akvaplan-niva AS, Fram Centre, 9007, Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: magnus.aune@akvaplan.niva.no.
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2021 Apr; 166:105262
Date
Apr-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Ecology
Gadiformes
Humans
Ice Cover
Russia
Abstract
The polar cod (Boreogadus saida) has a circumpolar distribution and is the most abundant planktivorous fish in the Arctic. Declining sea-ice coverage impacts polar cod directly and also facilitates expansion of human activities in the region leading to increasing anthropogenic pressures on biota. Here we summarize current data and knowledge on polar cod from the Russian sector of the Barents Sea and discuss knowledge needs for the management of polar cod under changing environmental conditions and anthropogenic impacts. We review 36 Russian historical (1935 - 2020) sources of data and knowledge largely unknown to western researchers, in addition to sources already published in the English language. This effort allowed for digitalization and visualization of 69 separate datasets on polar cod ecology, including maturation, fertility, feeding intensity, diet, lipid content, length-weight relationships and seasonal variation in larval size. Our review suggests that polar cod abundances are particularly large in the eastern Barents Sea and adjacent waters. Here, we identify and discuss key knowledge gaps. The review of polar cod in the eastern Barents Sea revealed 1) major variation in the timing and area of polar cod spawning, 2) uncertainty as to what degree the polar cod is dependent on sea ice, 3) deficient knowledge of juvenile (e.g., 0-group) distributions, particularly in the north-eastern Barents Sea, 4) deficient knowledge of the species' genetic structure and spatio-temporal distributions, and 5) insufficient understanding as to whether ongoing environmental change may induce phenological changes affecting the availability of potential food items for polar cod larvae and their match in space and time. Filling these knowledge gaps would provide an important step towards the reliable knowledge base needed in order to perform well-founded management and impact assessment under environmental changes and increasing anthropogenic impacts.
PubMed ID
33513484 View in PubMed
Less detail

Distribution and ecology of polar cod (Boreogadus saida) in the eastern Barents Sea: A review of historical literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303681
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2021 Jan 13; 166:105262
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Jan-13-2021
Author
Magnus Aune
Evgeniia Raskhozheva
Hector Andrade
Starrlight Augustine
Alexei Bambulyak
Lionel Camus
JoLynn Carroll
Andrey V Dolgov
Haakon Hop
Denis Moiseev
Paul E Renaud
Øystein Varpe
Author Affiliation
Akvaplan-niva AS, Fram Centre, 9007, Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: magnus.aune@akvaplan.niva.no.
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2021 Jan 13; 166:105262
Date
Jan-13-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Abstract
The polar cod (Boreogadus saida) has a circumpolar distribution and is the most abundant planktivorous fish in the Arctic. Declining sea-ice coverage impacts polar cod directly and also facilitates expansion of human activities in the region leading to increasing anthropogenic pressures on biota. Here we summarize current data and knowledge on polar cod from the Russian sector of the Barents Sea and discuss knowledge needs for the management of polar cod under changing environmental conditions and anthropogenic impacts. We review 36 Russian historical (1935 - 2020) sources of data and knowledge largely unknown to western researchers, in addition to sources already published in the English language. This effort allowed for digitalization and visualization of 69 separate datasets on polar cod ecology, including maturation, fertility, feeding intensity, diet, lipid content, length-weight relationships and seasonal variation in larval size. Our review suggests that polar cod abundances are particularly large in the eastern Barents Sea and adjacent waters. Here, we identify and discuss key knowledge gaps. The review of polar cod in the eastern Barents Sea revealed 1) major variation in the timing and area of polar cod spawning, 2) uncertainty as to what degree the polar cod is dependent on sea ice, 3) deficient knowledge of juvenile (e.g., 0-group) distributions, particularly in the north-eastern Barents Sea, 4) deficient knowledge of the species' genetic structure and spatio-temporal distributions, and 5) insufficient understanding as to whether ongoing environmental change may induce phenological changes affecting the availability of potential food items for polar cod larvae and their match in space and time. Filling these knowledge gaps would provide an important step towards the reliable knowledge base needed in order to perform well-founded management and impact assessment under environmental changes and increasing anthropogenic impacts.
PubMed ID
33513484 View in PubMed
Less detail

Functional roles and redundancy of demersal Barents Sea fish: Ecological implications of environmental change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299463
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0207451
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Magnus Aune
Michaela M Aschan
Michael Greenacre
Andrey V Dolgov
Maria Fossheim
Raul Primicerio
Author Affiliation
Akvaplan-niva AS, The Fram Centre, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0207451
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Biodiversity
Climate change
Ecology
Ecosystem
Fishes
Ice Cover
Abstract
When facing environmental change and intensified anthropogenic impact on marine ecosystems, extensive knowledge of how these systems are functioning is required in order to manage them properly. However, in high-latitude ecosystems, where climate change is expected to have substantial ecological impact, the ecosystem functions of biological species have received little attention, partly due to the limited biological knowledge of Arctic species. Functional traits address the ecosystem functions of member species, allowing the functionality of communities to be characterised and the degree of functional redundancy to be assessed. Ecosystems with higher functional redundancy are expected to be less affected by species loss, and therefore less sensitive to disturbance. Here we highlight and compare typical functional characteristics of Arctic and boreal fish in the Barents Sea and address the consequences of a community-wide reorganization driven by climate warming on functional redundancy and characterization. Based on trait and fish community composition data, we assessed functional redundancy of the Barents Sea fish community for the period 2004-2012, a period during which this northern region was characterized by rapidly warming water masses and declining sea ice coverage. We identified six functional groups, with distinct spatial distributions, that collectively provide a functional characterization of Barents Sea fish. The functional groups displayed different prevalence in boreal and Arctic water masses. Some functional groups displayed a spatial expansion towards the northeast during the study period, whereas other groups showed a general decline in functional redundancy. Presently, the observed patterns of functional redundancy would seem to provide sufficient scope for buffering against local loss in functional diversity only for the more speciose functional groups. Furthermore, the observed functional reconfiguration may affect future ecosystem functioning in the area. In a period of rapid environmental change, monitoring programs integrating functional traits will help inform management on ecosystem functioning and vulnerability.
PubMed ID
30462696 View in PubMed
Less detail

Functional roles and redundancy of demersal Barents Sea fish: Ecological implications of environmental change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296040
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0207451
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Magnus Aune
Michaela M Aschan
Michael Greenacre
Andrey V Dolgov
Maria Fossheim
Raul Primicerio
Author Affiliation
Akvaplan-niva AS, The Fram Centre, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0207451
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
When facing environmental change and intensified anthropogenic impact on marine ecosystems, extensive knowledge of how these systems are functioning is required in order to manage them properly. However, in high-latitude ecosystems, where climate change is expected to have substantial ecological impact, the ecosystem functions of biological species have received little attention, partly due to the limited biological knowledge of Arctic species. Functional traits address the ecosystem functions of member species, allowing the functionality of communities to be characterised and the degree of functional redundancy to be assessed. Ecosystems with higher functional redundancy are expected to be less affected by species loss, and therefore less sensitive to disturbance. Here we highlight and compare typical functional characteristics of Arctic and boreal fish in the Barents Sea and address the consequences of a community-wide reorganization driven by climate warming on functional redundancy and characterization. Based on trait and fish community composition data, we assessed functional redundancy of the Barents Sea fish community for the period 2004-2012, a period during which this northern region was characterized by rapidly warming water masses and declining sea ice coverage. We identified six functional groups, with distinct spatial distributions, that collectively provide a functional characterization of Barents Sea fish. The functional groups displayed different prevalence in boreal and Arctic water masses. Some functional groups displayed a spatial expansion towards the northeast during the study period, whereas other groups showed a general decline in functional redundancy. Presently, the observed patterns of functional redundancy would seem to provide sufficient scope for buffering against local loss in functional diversity only for the more speciose functional groups. Furthermore, the observed functional reconfiguration may affect future ecosystem functioning in the area. In a period of rapid environmental change, monitoring programs integrating functional traits will help inform management on ecosystem functioning and vulnerability.
PubMed ID
30462696 View in PubMed
Less detail

Seasonal ecology in ice-covered Arctic seas - Considerations for spill response decision making.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295122
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2018 Sep 05; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Sep-05-2018
Author
Magnus Aune
Ana Sofia Aniceto
Martin Biuw
Malin Daase
Stig Falk-Petersen
Eva Leu
Camilla A M Ottesen
Kjetil Sagerup
Lionel Camus
Author Affiliation
Akvaplan-niva AS, The Fram Centre, Hjalmar Johansens Gate 14, 9007, Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: magnus.aune@akvaplan.niva.no.
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2018 Sep 05; :
Date
Sep-05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Abstract
Due to retreating sea ice and predictions of undiscovered oil and gas resources, increased activity in Arctic shelf sea areas associated with shipping and oil and gas exploration is expected. Such activities may accidentally lead to oil spills in partly ice-covered ocean areas, which raises issues related to oil spill response. Net Environmental Benefit Analysis (NEBA) is the process that the response community uses to identify which combination of response strategies minimises the impact to environment and people. The vulnerability of Valued Ecosystem Components (VEC's) to oil pollution depends on their sensitivity to oil and the likelihood that they will be exposed to oil. As such, NEBA requires a good ecological knowledge base on biodiversity, species' distributions in time and space, and timing of ecological events. Biological resources found at interfaces (e.g., air/water, ice/water or water/coastline) are in general vulnerable because that is where oil can accumulate. Here, we summarize recent information about the seasonal, physical and ecological processes in Arctic waters and evaluate the importance these processes when considering in oil spill response decision making through NEBA. In spring-time, many boreal species conduct a lateral migration northwards in response to sea ice retraction and increased production associated with the spring bloom. However, many Arctic species, including fish, seabirds and marine mammals, are present in upper water layers in the Arctic throughout the year, and recent research has demonstrated that bioactivity during the Arctic winter is higher than previously assumed. Information on the seasonal presence/absence of less resilient VEC's such as marine mammals and sea birds in combination with the presence/absence of sea ice seems to be especially crucial to consider in a NEBA. In addition, quantification of the potential impact of different, realistic spill sizes on the energy cascade following the spring bloom at the ice-edge would provide important information for assessing ecosystem effects.
PubMed ID
30249455 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.