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The ambulance nurse experiences of non-conveying patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298052
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2019 Jan; 28(1-2):235-244
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Erik Höglund
Agneta Schröder
Margareta Möller
Magnus Andersson-Hagiwara
Emma Ohlsson-Nevo
Author Affiliation
Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2019 Jan; 28(1-2):235-244
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Ambulances - statistics & numerical data
Emergency medical services
Female
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Nurse's Role
Nurses - psychology
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
To explore ambulance nurses' (ANs) experiences of non-conveying patients to alternate levels of care.
Increases in ambulance utilisation and in the number of patients seeking ambulance care who do not require medical supervision or treatment during transport have led to increased nonconveyance (NC) and referral to other levels of care.
A qualitative interview study was conducted using an inductive research approach.
The study was conducted in a region in the middle of Sweden during 2016-2017. Twenty nurses were recruited from the ambulance departments in the region. A conventional content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The study followed the COREQ checklist.
The ANs experienced NC as a complex and difficult task that carried a large amount of responsibility. They wanted to be professional, spend time with the patient and find the best solution for him or her. These needs conflicted with the ANs' desire to be available for assignments with a higher priority. The ANs could feel frustrated when they perceived that ambulance resources were being misused and when it was difficult to follow the NC guidelines.
If ANs are expected to nonconvey patients seeking ambulance care, they need a formal mandate, knowledge and access to primary health care.
This study provides new knowledge regarding the work situation of ANs in relation to NC. These findings can guide future research and can be used by policymakers and ambulance organisations to highlight areas that need to evolve to improve patient care.
PubMed ID
30016570 View in PubMed
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Are scarce metals in cars functionally recycled?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283999
Source
Waste Manag. 2017 Feb;60:407-416
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Magnus Andersson
Maria Ljunggren Söderman
Björn A Sandén
Source
Waste Manag. 2017 Feb;60:407-416
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automobiles
Metals
Recycling - methods - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Waste Disposal Facilities
Waste Management - methods
Abstract
Improved recycling of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) may serve as an important strategy to address resource security risks related to increased global demand for scarce metals. However, in-depth knowledge of the magnitude and fate of such metals entering ELV recycling is lacking. This paper quantifies input of 25 scarce metals to Swedish ELV recycling, and estimates the extent to which they are recycled to material streams where their metal properties are utilised, i.e. are functionally recycled. Methodologically, scarce metals are mapped to main types of applications within newly produced Swedish car models and subsequently, material flow analysis of ELV waste streams is used as basis for identifying pathways of these applications and assessing whether contained metals are functionally recycled. Results indicate that, of the scarce metals, only platinum may be functionally recycled in its main application. Cobalt, gold, manganese, molybdenum, palladium, rhodium and silver may be functionally recycled depending on application and pathways taken. For remaining 17 metals, functional recycling is absent. Consequently, despite high overall ELV recycling rates of materials in general, there is considerable risk of losing ELV scarce metals to carrier metals, construction materials, backfilling materials and landfills. Given differences in the application of metals and identified pathways, prospects for increasing functional recycling are discussed.
PubMed ID
27395755 View in PubMed
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Common variants in human CRC genes as low-risk alleles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98081
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Apr;46(6):1041-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Simone Picelli
Pawel Zajac
Xiao-Lei Zhou
David Edler
Claes Lenander
Johan Dalén
Fredrik Hjern
Nils Lundqvist
Ulrik Lindforss
Lars Påhlman
Kennet Smedh
Anders Törnqvist
Jörn Holm
Martin Janson
Magnus Andersson
Susanne Ekelund
Louise Olsson
Joakim Lundeberg
Annika Lindblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Apr;46(6):1041-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Penetrance
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC) has been estimated to be around 35% and yet high-penetrance germline mutations found so far explain less than 5% of all cases. Much of the remaining variations could be due to the co-inheritance of multiple low penetrant variants. The identification of all the susceptibility alleles could have public health relevance in the near future. To test the hypothesis that what are considered polymorphisms in human CRC genes could constitute low-risk alleles, we selected eight common SNPs for a pilot association study in 1785 cases and 1722 controls. One SNP, rs3219489:G>C (MUTYH Q324H) seemed to confer an increased risk of rectal cancer in homozygous status (OR=1.52; CI=1.06-2.17). When the analysis was restricted to our 'super-controls', healthy individuals with no family history for cancer, also rs1799977:A>G (MLH1 I219V) was associated with an increased risk in both colon and rectum patients with an odds ratio of 1.28 (CI=1.02-1.60) and 1.34 (CI=1.05-1.72), respectively (under the dominant model); while 2 SNPs, rs1800932:A>G (MSH6 P92P) and rs459552:T>A (APC D1822V) seemed to confer a protective effect. The latter, in particular showed an odds ratio of 0.76 (CI=0.60-0.97) among colon patients and 0.73 (CI=0.56-0.95) among rectal patients. In conclusion, our study suggests that common variants in human CRC genes could constitute low-risk alleles.
PubMed ID
20149637 View in PubMed
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Decision support system in prehospital care: a randomized controlled simulation study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120458
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2013 Jan;31(1):145-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Magnus Andersson Hagiwara
Bengt Arne Sjöqvist
Lars Lundberg
Björn-Ove Suserud
Maria Henricson
Anders Jonsson
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden. magnus.hagiwara@hb.se
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2013 Jan;31(1):145-53
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances - manpower
Chi-Square Distribution
Decision Support Systems, Clinical
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Emergency Medicine - education
Female
Humans
Male
Manikins
Medical Errors - prevention & control
Patient Safety
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
Prehospital emergency medicine is a challenging discipline characterized by a high level of acuity, a lack of clinical information and a wide range of clinical conditions. These factors contribute to the fact that prehospital emergency medicine is a high-risk discipline in terms of medical errors. Prehospital use of Computerized Decision Support System (CDSS) may be a way to increase patient safety but very few studies evaluate the effect in prehospital care. The aim of the present study is to evaluate a CDSS.
In this non-blind block randomized, controlled trial, 60 ambulance nurses participated, randomized into 2 groups. To compensate for an expected learning effect the groups was further divided in two groups, one started with case A and the other group started with case B. The intervention group had access to and treated the two simulated patient cases with the aid of a CDSS. The control group treated the same cases with the aid of a regional guideline in paper format. The performance that was measured was compliance with regional prehospital guidelines and On Scene Time (OST).
There was no significant difference in the two group's characteristics. The intervention group had a higher compliance in the both cases, 80% vs. 60% (p
PubMed ID
23000323 View in PubMed
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The final assessment and its association with field assessment in patients who were transported by the emergency medical service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298892
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2018 Dec 27; 26(1):111
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-27-2018
Author
Carl Magnusson
Christer Axelsson
Lena Nilsson
Anneli Strömsöe
Monica Munters
Johan Herlitz
Magnus Andersson Hagiwara
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2018 Dec 27; 26(1):111
Date
Dec-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances
Diagnosis, Differential
Emergency medical services
Female
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Symptom Assessment
Abstract
In patients who call for the emergency medical service (EMS), there is a knowledge gap with regard to the final assessment after arriving at hospital and its association with field assessment.
In a representative population of patients who call for the EMS, to describe a) the final assessment at hospital discharge and b) the association between the assessment in the field and the assessment at hospital discharge.
Thirty randomly selected patients reached by a dispatched ambulance each month between 1 Jan and 31 Dec 2016 in one urban, one rural and one mixed ambulance organisation in Sweden took part in the study. The exclusion criteria were age?
PubMed ID
30587210 View in PubMed
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A frameshift mutation in ARMC3 is associated with a tail stump sperm defect in Swedish Red (Bos taurus) cattle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277628
Source
BMC Genet. 2016 Feb 29;17:49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-29-2016
Author
Hubert Pausch
Heli Venhoranta
Christine Wurmser
Kalle Hakala
Terhi Iso-Touru
Anu Sironen
Rikke K Vingborg
Hannes Lohi
Lennart Söderquist
Ruedi Fries
Magnus Andersson
Source
BMC Genet. 2016 Feb 29;17:49
Date
Feb-29-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Armadillo Domain Proteins - genetics
Breeding
Cattle - genetics
Chromosomes, Mammalian - genetics
Fertility - genetics
Frameshift Mutation
Genetic Variation
Genotyping Techniques
Homozygote
Infertility - diagnosis - genetics - veterinary
Male
Semen Analysis
Spermatogenesis - genetics
Spermatozoa - metabolism - pathology
Sweden
Abstract
Artificial insemination is widely used in many cattle breeding programs. Semen samples of breeding bulls are collected and closely examined immediately after collection at artificial insemination centers. Only ejaculates without anomalous findings are retained for artificial insemination. Although morphological aberrations of the spermatozoa are a frequent reason for discarding ejaculates, the genetic determinants underlying poor semen quality are scarcely understood.
A tail stump sperm defect was observed in three bulls of the Swedish Red cattle breed. The spermatozoa of affected bulls were immotile because of severely disorganized tails indicating disturbed spermatogenesis. We genotyped three affected bulls and 18 unaffected male half-sibs at 46,035 SNPs and performed homozygosity mapping to map the fertility disorder to an 8.42 Mb interval on bovine chromosome 13. The analysis of whole-genome re-sequencing data of an affected bull and 300 unaffected animals from eleven cattle breeds other than Swedish Red revealed a 1 bp deletion (Chr13: 24,301,425 bp, ss1815612719) in the eleventh exon of the armadillo repeat containing 3-encoding gene (ARMC3) that was compatible with the supposed recessive mode of inheritance. The deletion is expected to alter the reading frame and to induce premature translation termination (p.A451fs26). The mutated protein is shortened by 401 amino acids (46 %) and lacks domains that are likely essential for normal protein function.
We report the phenotypic and genetic characterization of a sterilizing tail stump sperm defect in the Swedish Red cattle breed. Exploiting high-density genotypes and massive re-sequencing data enabled us to identify the most likely causal mutation for the fertility disorder in bovine ARMC3. Our results provide the basis for monitoring the mutated variant in the Swedish Red cattle population and for the early identification of infertile animals.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26923438 View in PubMed
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Frequent detection of respiratory agents by multiplex PCR on oropharyngeal samples in Swedish school-attending adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129494
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2012 May;44(5):393-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Anna C Nilsson
Kenneth Persson
Per Björkman
Robin Brittain-Long
Magnus Lindh
Lars-Magnus Andersson
Johan Westin
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Infectious Diseases Unit, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. anna.nilsson@med.lu.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2012 May;44(5):393-7
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - genetics - isolation & purification
Cough
Female
Humans
Male
Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Mycoplasma pneumoniae - genetics - isolation & purification
Oropharynx - microbiology - virology
Respiratory Tract Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Rhinovirus - genetics - isolation & purification
Schools
Sweden
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - virology
Viruses - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
Respiratory agents may be detected in the oropharynx of healthy individuals. The extent of this condition and the reasons behind it are largely unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the factors associated with the presence of respiratory agents in the oropharynx of adolescents healthy enough to attend school activities.
On a single day in December, samples from the posterior wall of the oropharynx of adolescents aged 10-15 y were obtained using cotton-tipped swabs. The samples were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of 13 respiratory viruses and 2 bacteria (Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae).
Out of the 232 adolescents sampled, 67 (29%) had any respiratory symptom. A positive PCR result was found in 50 individuals (22%). Human rhinovirus was the most commonly found agent. Respiratory agents were significantly more frequent in the younger age group (10-13 y) than in the older age group (14-15 y): 26% (38/148) vs 14% (12/84), respectively; p = 0.04. Cough was the only symptom that was more common among individuals with a positive PCR test than among those with a negative PCR test: 8/50 (16%) vs 11/182 (6%); p = 0.02. Family size and class size were not associated with the likelihood of a positive PCR test.
The presence of respiratory agents in the oropharynx is a frequent finding among adolescents healthy enough to attend school activities. The high prevalence was found to be associated with young age, but not with the size of the family or class.
PubMed ID
22103467 View in PubMed
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The impact of viral respiratory tract infections on long-term morbidity and mortality following lung transplantation: a retrospective cohort study using a multiplex PCR panel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116000
Source
Transplantation. 2013 Jan 27;95(2):383-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-27-2013
Author
Jesper Magnusson
Johan Westin
Lars-Magnus Andersson
Robin Brittain-Long
Gerdt C Riise
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine/Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. jesper.magnusson@vgregion.se
Source
Transplantation. 2013 Jan 27;95(2):383-8
Date
Jan-27-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bronchiolitis Obliterans - mortality - virology
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - virology
Chi-Square Distribution
DNA, Viral - analysis
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Graft Rejection - mortality - virology
Graft Survival
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Lung Transplantation - adverse effects - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Respiratory Tract Infections - diagnosis - mortality - virology
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The major factor affecting morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation (LTX) is bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Earlier studies have suggested a connection between the presence of viral agents and morbidity in this patient group, but data are somewhat conflicting. The objective of this study was to investigate the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and graft loss after LTX in relation to the presence of respiratory viruses during the first year after LTX.
The study is a retrospective cohort study of 39 LTX recipients 11Y13 years after surgery. Patients were operated between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2000 at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. The presence of virus in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids from patients during the first year after surgery was analyzed retrospectively using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction test capable of detecting 15 respiratory agents. The time to BOS or graft loss was analyzed in relation to the positive findings in BAL during the first year after LTX.
Patients with one or more viruses detected in BAL during the first year after transplantation demonstrated a significantly faster development of BOS (P=0.005) compared with patients with no virus detected. No significant difference in graft survival was found.
Our results suggest that the long-term prognosis after LTX may be negatively affected by viral respiratory tract infections during the first year after LTX.
PubMed ID
23444472 View in PubMed
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Incidence, Etiology, and Outcomes of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Population-Based Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290033
Source
Open Forum Infect Dis. 2018 Feb; 5(2):ofy010
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2018
Author
Agnar Bjarnason
Johan Westin
Magnus Lindh
Lars-Magnus Andersson
Karl G Kristinsson
Arthur Löve
Olafur Baldursson
Magnus Gottfredsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik.
Source
Open Forum Infect Dis. 2018 Feb; 5(2):ofy010
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The microbial etiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often unclear in clinical practice, and previous studies have produced variable results. Population-based studies examining etiology and incidence are lacking. This study examined the incidence and etiology of CAP requiring hospitalization in a population-based cohort as well as risk factors and outcomes for specific etiologies.
Consecutive admissions due to CAP in Reykjavik, Iceland were studied. Etiologic testing was performed with cultures, urine-antigen detection, and polymerase chain reaction analysis of airway samples. Outcomes were length of stay, intensive care unit admission, assisted ventilation, and mortality.
The inclusion rate was 95%. The incidence of CAP requiring hospitalization was 20.6 cases per 10000 adults/year. A potential pathogen was detected in 52% (164 of 310) of admissions and in 74% (43 of 58) with complete sample sets. Streptococcuspneumoniae was the most common pathogen (61 of 310, 20%; incidence: 4.1/10000). Viruses were identified in 15% (47 of 310; incidence: 3.1/10000), Mycoplasmapneumoniae were identified in 12% (36 of 310; incidence: 2.4/10000), and multiple pathogens were identified in 10% (30 of 310; incidence: 2.0/10000). Recent antimicrobial therapy was associated with increased detection of M pneumoniae (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
29479548 View in PubMed
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Lopinavir/ritonavir, atazanavir/ritonavir, and efavirenz in antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected individuals over 144 weeks: an open-label randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117488
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2013 Jul;45(7):543-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Lars-Magnus Andersson
Jan Vesterbacka
Anders Blaxhult
Leo Flamholc
Staffan Nilsson
Vidar Ormaasen
Anders Sönnerborg
Magnus Gisslén
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. lars-magnus.andersson@infect.gu.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2013 Jul;45(7):543-51
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Retroviral Agents - administration & dosage
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - methods
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Female
HIV Infections - drug therapy - virology
HIV-1 - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Prospective Studies
RNA, Viral - blood
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Viral Load
Abstract
The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of ritonavir boosted atazanavir versus ritonavir boosted lopinavir or efavirenz, all in combination with 2 nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), over 144 weeks in antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected individuals.
A prospective open-label randomized controlled trial was conducted at 29 sites in Sweden and Norway between April 2004 and December 2009. Patients were randomized to receive either efavirenz 600 mg once daily (EFV), or atazanavir 300 mg and ritonavir 100 mg once daily (AZV/r), or lopinavir 400 mg and ritonavir 100 mg twice daily (LPV/r). The primary endpoints were the proportion of patients with HIV-1 RNA 100,000 copies/ml at baseline had similar response rates in all arms.
EFV was superior to LPV/r at week 48, but there were no significant differences between the 3 arms in the long-term (144 weeks) follow-up.
PubMed ID
23294034 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.