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The Ambulatory Sentinel Practice Network: purpose, methods, and policies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240865
Source
J Fam Pract. 1984 Feb;18(2):275-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1984
Author
L A Green
M. Wood
L. Becker
E S Farley
W L Freeman
J. Froom
C. Hames
L J Niebauer
W W Rosser
M. Seifert
Source
J Fam Pract. 1984 Feb;18(2):275-80
Date
Feb-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidentiality
Data Collection
Female
Governing Board - organization & administration
Humans
Infant
Informed consent
Male
Middle Aged
Organizational Objectives
Policy Making
Primary Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Quality Control
Research
United States
Abstract
The Ambulatory Sentinel Practice Network (ASPN) is a network of primary health care practices across the United States and Canada offering (1) a laboratory for the study of populations under the care of primary care providers, and (2) surveillance of primary care problems and services. This paper reports the methods and policies developed and used by ASPN to conduct studies and describes the initial sentinel practices.
PubMed ID
6699565 View in PubMed
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An increased incidence of total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage among aboriginal Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213587
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1996 Jan;12(1):81-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
B W McCrindle
M M Wood
G F Collins
B. Wheatley
R D Rowe
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1996 Jan;12(1):81-5
Date
Jan-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Infant, Newborn
Manitoba - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Pulmonary Veins - abnormalities
Registries
Risk
Abstract
To determine whether Aboriginal Canadians from Manitoba and Ontario have an increased incidence of isolated total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage (TAPVD) and to compare results obtained from two different data sources and time periods.
A nonconcurrent cohort study was undertaken. Incidence rates and relative risk from 'traditional' data sources (cases from medical records data; births from Census, Vital Statistics and Native Registry data for Manitoba and Ontario) from 1972-84 were derived and compared with those from computerized hospital abstract data from Manitoba for 1987-91.
Using traditional data sources an incidence of 0.282/1000 live births was noted in Aboriginals versus 0.062 in non-Aboriginals for a relative risk of 4.6 (95% CI = 2.7-7.7). For Manitoba only the relative risk was 5.8 (95% CI = 2.6-12.8). Using computerized administrative data from Manitoba the relative risk was 5.8 (95% CI = 1.3-25.8).
There is an increased incidence of isolated TAPVD in Aboriginal peoples from Manitoba and Ontario. Further epidemiological investigation is necessary to determine the nature of this association.
PubMed ID
8595573 View in PubMed
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Body mass index and all cause mortality in HUNT and UK Biobank studies: linear and non-linear mendelian randomisation analyses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299430
Source
BMJ. 2019 03 26; 364:l1042
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-26-2019
Author
Yi-Qian Sun
Stephen Burgess
James R Staley
Angela M Wood
Steven Bell
Stephen K Kaptoge
Qi Guo
Thomas R Bolton
Amy M Mason
Adam S Butterworth
Emanuele Di Angelantonio
Gunnhild Å Vie
Johan H Bjørngaard
Jonas Minet Kinge
Yue Chen
Xiao-Mei Mai
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine (IKOM), NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
BMJ. 2019 03 26; 364:l1042
Date
03-26-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Female
Humans
Male
Mendelian Randomization Analysis
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - mortality
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Thinness - mortality
United Kingdom - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate the shape of the causal relation between body mass index (BMI) and mortality.
Linear and non-linear mendelian randomisation analyses.
Nord-Trøndelag Health (HUNT) Study (Norway) and UK Biobank (United Kingdom).
Middle to early late aged participants of European descent: 56?150 from the HUNT Study and 366?385 from UK Biobank.
All cause and cause specific (cardiovascular, cancer, and non-cardiovascular non-cancer) mortality.
12?015 and 10?344 participants died during a median of 18.5 and 7.0 years of follow-up in the HUNT Study and UK Biobank, respectively. Linear mendelian randomisation analyses indicated an overall positive association between genetically predicted BMI and the risk of all cause mortality. An increase of 1 unit in genetically predicted BMI led to a 5% (95% confidence interval 1% to 8%) higher risk of mortality in overweight participants (BMI 25.0-29.9) and a 9% (4% to 14%) higher risk of mortality in obese participants (BMI =30.0) but a 34% (16% to 48%) lower risk in underweight (BMI
PubMed ID
30957776 View in PubMed
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British Military freezing cold injuries: a 13-year review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270722
Source
J R Army Med Corps. 2016 Mar 3;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-3-2016
Author
Kieran M Heil
E H N Oakley
A M Wood
Source
J R Army Med Corps. 2016 Mar 3;
Date
Mar-3-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Cold injuries have been a recurrent feature of warfare for millennia and continue to present during British Military operations today. Those affecting the peripheries are divided into freezing cold injury (FCI) and non-FCI. FCI occurs when tissue fluids freeze at around -0.5°C and is commonly referred to as frostnip or frostbite.
All FMED7 notes held at the Institute of Naval Medicine's Cold Weather Injury Clinic (CIC) from 2002 to 2014 were searched for the terms 'frostbite' and 'frostnip' and then analysed to identify common themes.
In total 245 results were found and from these, 149 patients with a positive FCI diagnosis were identified and formed the cohort of this study. Royal Marines (RM) represented over 50% of patients and Arctic training in Norway accounted for over two thirds of the total cases. The extremities were almost always those areas which were affected by FCI. Further analysis of the RM cases showed the majority of those injured were of the most junior rank (Marine/Private or Lance Corporal).
A lack of supporting climatic and activity data meant that it was difficult to draw additional conclusions from the data collected. In future, a greater emphasis should be placed on collection of climatic and additional data when FCIs are diagnosed. These data should be collated at the end of each deployment and published as was regularly done historically. It is hoped that these data could then be used as the starting point for an annual climatic study day, where issues related to FCIs could be discussed in a Tri-Service environment and lessons learned disseminated around all British Forces personnel.
PubMed ID
26941219 View in PubMed
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Can alexithymia be assessed in adolescents? Psychometric properties of the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale in younger, middle, and older adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141166
Source
Psychol Assess. 2010 Dec;22(4):798-808
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
James D A Parker
Jennifer M Eastabrook
Kateryna V Keefer
Laura M Wood
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada. jparker@trentu.ca
Source
Psychol Assess. 2010 Dec;22(4):798-808
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - psychology
Age Factors
Canada
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Young Adult
Abstract
The 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20; Bagby, Parker, & Taylor, 1994; Bagby, Taylor, & Parker, 1994) is the most widely used self-report measure of the alexithymia construct. The TAS-20 comprises 3 factors that assess difficulty identifying feelings, difficulty describing feelings, and externally oriented thinking. Although the instrument is being increasingly used with adolescent respondents, the psychometric properties of the TAS-20 have not been systematically evaluated in preadult populations. In the present study, we examined measurement invariance of the factor structure, internal reliability, and mean levels of responses on the TAS-20 in groups of younger adolescents (aged 13-14 years), middle adolescents (aged 15-16 years), and older adolescents (aged 17-18 years), as well as in a comparison group of young adults (aged 19-21 years). Formal readability analysis of the TAS-20 assessment was also conducted. Results revealed systematic age differences in the factor structure and psychometric properties of the TAS-20, with the quality of measurement progressively deteriorating with younger age. Much of this effect could be attributed to the reading difficulty of the scale. The use of the TAS-20 with teenage respondents is not recommended without appropriate adaptation and further psychometric validation. Several adaptation strategies are discussed.
PubMed ID
20804260 View in PubMed
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Clinical pattern of toxicity associated with the novel synthetic cathinone mephedrone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96545
Source
Emerg Med J. 2010 Jun 26;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2010
Author
D M Wood
S L Greene
P I Dargan
Author Affiliation
Clinical Toxicology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
Source
Emerg Med J. 2010 Jun 26;
Date
Jun-26-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background There is evidence of increasing use of the synthetic cathinone mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone), particularly amongst clubbers. However, there have only two single case reports of mephedrone toxicity. The aim of this study is to report the pattern of clinical toxicity seen with mephedrone use. Case Series We describe 15 patients who presented to our Emergency Department following self-reported mephedrone use. Significant clinical features seen included agitation in 53.3%, tachycardia in 40%, systolic hypertension in 20% and seizures in 20%. Twenty per cent required treatment with benzodiazepines, predominantly for management of agitation. All patients were discharged with no sequelae. Previous user reports have suggested that mephedrone use is associated with cool/blue peripheries; this was not seen in any of the patients in our series. Conclusion The pattern of toxicity seen with mephedrone in this series is similar to that seen with 1-benzylpiperazine which has recently been classified under UK and EU misuse of drugs legislation. On the basis of this, together with a recent confirmed mephedrone related death in Sweden, we feel that appropriate assessments should be undertaken to determine the legal status of mephedrone.
PubMed ID
20581379 View in PubMed
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Cross-cultural alexithymia: validity of the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale in North American aboriginal populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175711
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2005 Jan;58(1):83-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
James D A Parker
Peggy A Shaughnessy
Laura M Wood
Sarah A Majeski
Jennifer M Eastabrook
Author Affiliation
Emotion and Health Research Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada K9J 7B8. jparker@trentu.ca
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2005 Jan;58(1):83-8
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - ethnology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The generalizability of the alexithymia construct to North American aboriginal culture was examined by assessing the replicability of the factor structure of the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) in two different adult samples. The study also assessed the reliability of the scale and the influence of gender, age, and education on alexithymia levels.
The first sample was a community-based group of 123 aboriginal men and women; the second sample was 102 male aboriginal offenders. Both samples completed the TAS-20.
The replicability of the three-factor structure for the TAS-20 was supported in both groups using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The TAS-20 and its three factors demonstrated adequate internal reliability, and the variables of gender, age, and education accounted for small or nonsignificant amounts of variability in total TAS-20 and factor scale scores.
The results provide additional support for the factorial validity of the TAS-20 in diverse cultural groups.
PubMed ID
15771874 View in PubMed
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[Do we really want a general one-embryo transfer in IVF?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63829
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Mar 28;98(13):1560-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-28-2001

Exploring the impact of an Aboriginal Health Worker on hospitalised Aboriginal experiences: lessons from cardiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145324
Source
Aust Health Rev. 2009 Nov;33(4):549-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Kate P Taylor
Sandra C Thompson
Julie S Smith
Lyn Dimer
Mohammed Ali
Marianne M Wood
Author Affiliation
Centre for International Health and Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia. k.taylor@curtin.edu.au
Source
Aust Health Rev. 2009 Nov;33(4):549-57
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology Service, Hospital
Hospitalization
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Patient satisfaction
Personnel, Hospital
Professional-Patient Relations
Abstract
To enhance Aboriginal inpatient care and improve outpatient cardiac rehabilitation utilisation, a tertiary hospital in Western Australia recruited an Aboriginal Health Worker (AHW). Interviews were undertaken with the cardiology AHW, other hospital staff including another AHW, and recent Aboriginal cardiac patients to assess the impact of this position. The impact of the AHW included facilitating culturally appropriate care, bridging communication divides, reducing discharges against medical advice, providing cultural education, increasing inpatient contact time, improving follow-up practices and enhancing patient referral linkages. Challenges included poor job role definition, clinical restrictions and limitations in AHW training for hospital settings. This study demonstrates that AHWs can have significant impacts on Aboriginal cardiac inpatient experiences and outpatient care. Although this study was undertaken in cardiology, the lessons are transferable across the hospital setting.
PubMed ID
20166903 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.