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109 records – page 1 of 11.

Alcohol intake, beverage preference, and risk of hip fracture in men and women. Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10664
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Jun 1;149(11):993-1001
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1999
Author
S. Høidrup
M. Grønbaek
A. Gottschau
J B Lauritzen
M. Schroll
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Jun 1;149(11):993-1001
Date
Jun-1-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sex Factors
Abstract
The authors prospectively studied the association between quantity and type of alcohol intake and risk of hip fracture among 17,868 men and 13,917 women. Analyses were based on pooled data from three population studies conducted in 1964-1992 in Copenhagen, Denmark. During follow-up, 500 first hip fractures were identified in women and 307 in men. A low to moderate weekly alcohol intake (1-27 drinks for men and 1-13 drinks for women) was not associated with hip fracture. Among men, the relative risk of hip fracture gradually increased for those who drank 28 drinks or more per week (relative risk (RR) = 1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-2.89 for 28-41 drinks; RR = 5.28, 95% CI 2.60-10.70 for 70 or more drinks) as compared with abstainers. Women who drank 14-27 drinks per week had an age-adjusted relative risk of hip fracture of 1.44 (95% CI 1.03-2.03), but the association weakened after adjustment for confounders (RR = 1.32, 95% CI 0.92-1.87). The risk of hip fracture differed according to the type of alcohol preferred: preferrers of beer had a higher risk of hip fracture (RR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.11-1.91) than preferrers of other types of alcoholic beverages. The corresponding relative risks for preferrers of wine and spirits were 0.77 (95% CI 0.58-1.03) and 0.82 (95% CI 0.58-1.14), respectively. In conclusion, an alcohol intake within the current European drinking limits does not influence the risk of hip fracture, whereas an alcohol intake of more than 27 drinks per week is a major risk factor for men.
PubMed ID
10355374 View in PubMed
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All-cause mortality associated with physical activity during leisure time, work, sports, and cycling to work.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67480
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2000 Jun 12;160(11):1621-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-12-2000
Author
L B Andersen
P. Schnohr
M. Schroll
H O Hein
Author Affiliation
Institute for Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. lbandersen@ifi.ku.dk
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2000 Jun 12;160(11):1621-8
Date
Jun-12-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bicycling - statistics & numerical data
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Exertion
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sex Distribution
Sports - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Work - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Physical activity is associated with low mortality in men, but little is known about the association in women, different age groups, and everyday activity. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between levels of physical activity during work, leisure time, cycling to work, and sports participation and all-cause mortality. DESIGN: Prospective study to assess different types of physical activity associated with risk of mortality during follow-up after the subsequent examination. Mean follow-up from examination was 14.5 years. SETTING: Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were 13,375 women and 17,265 men, 20 to 93 years of age, who were randomly selected. Physical activity was assessed by self-report, and health status, including blood pressure, total cholesterol level, triglyceride levels, body mass index, smoking, and educational level, was evaluated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: All-cause mortality. RESULTS: A total of 2,881 women and 5,668 men died. Compared with the sedentary, age- and sex-adjusted mortality rates in leisure time physical activity groups 2 to 4 were 0.68 (95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.71), 0.61 (95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.66), and 0.53 (95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.68), respectively, with no difference between sexes and age groups. Within the moderately and highly active persons, sports participants experienced only half the mortality of nonparticipants. Bicycling to work decreased risk of mortality in approximately 40% after multivariate adjustment, including leisure time physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Leisure time physical activity was inversely associated with all-cause mortality in both men and women in all age groups. Benefit was found from moderate leisure time physical activity, with further benefit from sports activity and bicycling as transportation.
PubMed ID
10847255 View in PubMed
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An international study of social engagement among nursing home residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72621
Source
Age Ageing. 1997 Sep;26 Suppl 2:55-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
M. Schroll
P V Jónsson
V. Mor
K. Berg
S. Sherwood
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Kommunehospitalet, Kobenhavn K, Denmark. gerischr@inet.uni-c.dk
Source
Age Ageing. 1997 Sep;26 Suppl 2:55-9
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition
Comparative Study
Europe
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Japan
Male
Nursing Homes
Patient Admission
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Social Behavior
United States
Abstract
METHOD: data using the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) from nursing home populations in five countries (Denmark, Iceland, Italy, Japan, USA) were assembled from 396277 residents. The distribution of a new quality of life measure, 'social engagement', embedded in the RAI and found to be reliable and valid in the USA, was examined and compared in the international samples. RESULTS: in all five countries' nursing home populations engagement was highest among residents with adequate functioning in activities of daily living (ADL) and cognition, but the level of social engagement differed considerably by country among residents with poor ADL functioning, who had adequate cognition. The lowest scores were in Italy and Japan. The amount of time residents spend in activities stratified by ADL and cognition reveal the same pattern cross-culturally--cognitively impaired residents are least actively involved. CONCLUSIONS: the Minimum Data Set measure of social engagement is stable across types of residents and across nations and can serve as a marker of nursing home quality.
PubMed ID
9464556 View in PubMed
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Apolipoprotein(a) isoforms and coronary heart disease in men: a nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11012
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1997 Jul 11;132(1):77-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-11-1997
Author
I C Klausen
A. Sjøl
P S Hansen
L U Gerdes
L. Møller
L. Lemming
M. Schroll
O. Faergeman
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiology A, Aarhus Amtesygehus University Hospital, Aarhus C, Denmark.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1997 Jul 11;132(1):77-84
Date
Jul-11-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Apolipoproteins - blood - chemistry - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Susceptibility
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Lipids - blood
Lipoprotein(a) - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Weight
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to examine the possible associations between low molecular weight (LMW) apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) isoforms (F,B,S1,S2) and coronary heart disease (CHD). We conducted a nested case-control (prospective) study of five cohorts of white men: The 1936 cohort (baseline 1976, n = 548) and four cohorts from MONICA I born in 1923 (n = 463), 1933 (n = 491), 1943 (n = 504) and 1953 (n = 448) studied at baseline in 1983. At follow up in 1991, 52 subjects had developed a first myocardial infarction and 22 had been hospitalized with angina pectoris. Plasma samples obtained at baseline were stored frozen until 1993-94, when case samples (n = 74) were analyzed together with samples from matched (disease free) controls (n = 190). In a statistical model (conditional logistic regression) including all age groups, cholesterol (or apo B) level (P
PubMed ID
9247362 View in PubMed
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Are cardiovascular risk factors still predictive in the elderly? The longitudinal study of epidemiology of aging in Copenhagen County, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50032
Source
Aging (Milano). 1998 Apr;10(2):167-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998

Arterial hypertension as a risk factor for cerebrovascular disease 15-years follow-up of the 1914-population in Glostrup.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55819
Source
Acta Med Scand Suppl. 1983;676:33-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983

Assessment of habitual energy and macronutrient intake in adults: comparison of a seven day food record with a dietary history interview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61703
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Feb;56(2):105-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
S. Høidrup
A H Andreasen
M. Osler
A N Pedersen
L M Jørgensen
T. Jørgensen
M. Schroll
B L Heitmann
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen County Centre for Preventive Medicine, Research Unit for Dietary Studies, Medical Dept M, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. sh@ipm.hosp.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Feb;56(2):105-13
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy Intake - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the quantitative agreement between a 7 day food record and a diet history interview when these are conducted under the same conditions and to evaluate whether the two methods assess habitual diet intake differently among subgroups of age and body mass index (BMI). DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Population study, Denmark. SUBJECTS: A total of 175 men and 173 women aged 30-60 y, selected randomly from a larger population sample of Danish adults. INTERVENTIONS: All subjects had habitual diet intake assessed by a diet history interview and completed a 7 day food record within 3 weeks following the interview. The diet history interview and coding of records were performed by the same trained dietician. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Median between-method difference in assessment of total energy intake, absolute intake of macronutrients, and nutrient energy percentages. Difference between reported energy intake from both methods and estimated energy expenditure in different subgroups. RESULTS: Energy and macronutrient intake was assessed slightly higher by the 7 day food record than by the diet history interview, but in absolute terms the differences were negligible. The between-method difference in assessment of total energy intake appeared to be stable over the range of age and BMI in both sexes. As compared to estimated total energy expenditure, both diet assessment methods underestimated energy intake by approximately 20%. For both methods the under-reporting increased by BMI in both sexes and by age in men. CONCLUSIONS: Energy and macronutrient intake data collected under even conditions by either a 7 day food record or a diet history interview may be collapsed and analysed independent of the underlying diet method. Both diet methods, however, appear to underestimate energy intake dependent on age and BMI. SPONSORSHIP: Danish Medical Research Council, the FREJA programme.
PubMed ID
11857043 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure as a cardiovascular risk factor in a 10-year prospective study of men and women born in 1914 and examined in 1964 and 1974 in Glostrup.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244201
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1981 Sep;28(4):154-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1981

Body composition of 80-years old men and women and its relation to muscle strength, physical activity and functional ability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49778
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2002;6(6):413-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
A N Pedersen
L. Ovesen
M. Schroll
K. Avlund
P. Era
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, DK-2860 Søborg, Denmark. anp@fdir.dk
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2002;6(6):413-20
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - physiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Electric Impedance
Exercise - physiology
Female
Hand Strength
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To measure body composition and analyse the relation to muscle strength, physical activity and functional ability in healthy, old subjects, and to relate the results to an optimal BMI level for the elderly. SETTING: Subjects aged 80 years living at home from the 1914-population in Glostrup, Denmark. SUBJECTS AND METHOD: 121 men and 113 women had their height and weight measured. Body fat mass and fat-free mass were assessed by bioelectrical impedance. Muscle strength was measured as handgrip, elbow flexion, knee extension, body flexion and body extension. Physical activity was self reported and functional ability was assessed by the Physical Performance Test (PPT) and self reported mobility including information about tiredness and help. RESULTS: After dividing BMI into three groups: BMI 29 no relationship was seen between a BMI interval of 24-29 kg/m2, and physical activity and functional ability. BMI was related to body fat mass, and FFM was related to muscle strength. Muscle strength was related to mobility and PPT. Mobility and PPT were mutually related and were related to physical activity. CONCLUSION: Our cross sectional study did not support newly proposed guidelines for the elderly of an optimal BMI interval of 24-29 kg/m2. We found relations between body composition, muscle strength, physical activity and functional ability.
PubMed ID
12459892 View in PubMed
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Body composition, smoking and physical activity in 75-year-old men and women in three Nordic localities with special reference to diagnosed diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47864
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 1999;3(3):172-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
I. Gause-Nilsson
H. Suominen
P. Laukkanen
M. Schroll
B. Steen
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 1999;3(3):172-6
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Exercise
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Joint Diseases - epidemiology
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Physical Fitness
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe and compare anthropometric characteristics among populations of 75-year-olds in three Nordic localities and to investigate possible relationships with chronic heart disease (CHD), chronic lung disease (CLD), diabetes mellitus, arthrosis and life-style factors such as smoking and physical activity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Anthropometric data were measured in 104 men and 191 women in Jyvaskyla (Finland), 196 men and 209 women in Glostrup (Denmark) and in 127 men and 167 women in Goteborg (Sweden). Variables assessed were body height, body weight, BMI, waist/hip ratio, skinfolds from several sites and percent body fat by bioelectrical impedance. The diagnosis of diseases were made by a physician based on the individual's medical history, drugs and medical examination. Physical activity was recorded by self-rating. RESULTS: Men in Goteborg were taller and had a higher body weight while there was no difference in BMI among the men. Among women, those in Goteborg were tallest, while those in Jyvaskyla had the highest body weight, BMI, percent of body fat and waist/hip ratio. Biceps and triceps skinfolds were highest in men from Goteborg, while in women triceps and subscapular skinfolds were highest in those from Jyvaskyla. CHD was most common in those from Jyvaskyla, and women with CHD had a higher body weight, BMI and lean body mass in all three localities. Lean body mass was lower in men and women with CLD and women with CLD were also shorter, with a lower body weight, BMI, and percent body fat. Diabetes mellitus was associated with a higher body weight, BMI, percent body fat and lean body mass in women, but not in men. Both men and women with arthrosis had a higher BMI, while smoking was only associated with CHD in those from Jyvhskyla. In men with CHD the proportion of persons with low physical activity was higher in all three localities. The physical activity was also lower among men with CLD and diabetes mellitus in Goteborg and Glostrup. CONCLUSION: There were anthropometric differences among 75-year-olds in the three Nordic localities. CHD and CLD were associated with various anthropometric variables. These findings may reflect either cause and effect relationships between diseases and anthropometric characteristics or differences in life-style factors influencing morbidity.
PubMed ID
10840472 View in PubMed
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109 records – page 1 of 11.