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Accuracy of ovarian cancer ICD-10 diagnosis in a Danish population-based hospital discharge registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16919
Source
Eur J Gynaecol Oncol. 2005;26(3):266-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
M S Tetsche
M. Nørgaard
M V Skriver
E S Andersen
T L Lash
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Gynaecol Oncol. 2005;26(3):266-70
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
International Classification of Diseases - standards
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - diagnosis - mortality
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We estimated the accuracy of ICD-10 diagnosis of ovarian cancer in a Danish discharge registry (HDR) by comparing it with Cancer Registry data (DCR). STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Patients (N=489) living in North Jutland County, Denmark with ovarian cancer or borderline tumour registered in the HDR or the DCR. We estimated the completeness and positive predictive value (PPV) of ovarian cancer discharge diagnosis. Mortality rates were constructed for both registries. RESULTS: The completeness in the HDR for ovarian cancer was 96% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 94%-98%) and PPV was 87% (95% CI: 85%-90%). 87 (18%) of the patients coded with ovarian cancer in the HDR had borderline tumours. When borderline tumours were excluded from the DCR, the PPV declined to 69% and the completeness did not change. The mortality rate ratio for ovarian cancer registered in the HDR compared to the DCR was 1.08 (95% CI: 0.90-1.29). CONCLUSION: The discharge data (ICD-10) had some misclassification, but can be a valuable tool in assessment of the prognosis of ovarian cancer.
PubMed ID
15991523 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking and risk of subsequent hospitalisation with pneumonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100920
Source
Eur Respir J. 2011 Jun 9;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-9-2011
Author
J B Kornum
K M Due
M. Nørgaard
A. Tjønneland
K. Overvad
H T Sørensen
R W Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Clinical Institute, Aarhus University Hospital Aarhus Denmark.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2011 Jun 9;
Date
Jun-9-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The dose-response relationship between alcohol consumption and pneumonia risk in healthy individuals is poorly understood. We examined 22,485 males and 24,682 females from Denmark who were aged 50-64 yrs. Subjects were without major chronic diseases at baseline and had median 12 yrs follow-up for first-time hospitalisation with pneumonia. 1,091 (males) and 944 (females) had a pneumonia-related hospitalisation. Among males, the risk of pneumonia was increased for alcohol abstainers and those who drank large weekly amounts: Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for 0, 7-20, 21-34, 35-50, and >50 drinks per week were 1.49 (95% CI 1.00-2.21), 0.88 (0.76-1.03), 0.87 (0.72-1.05), 1.15 (0.93-1.44), and 1.81 (1.40-2.33), respectively, compared with 1-6 drinks per week. The association between high alcohol intake and pneumonia persisted after controlling for subsequent chronic diseases. Among females, HRs for 0, 7-20, 21-35, and >35 drinks weekly were 1.26 (0.89-1.79), 1.01 (0.88-1.17), 1.10 (0.88-1.37), and 0.54 (0.29-1.01), respectively. For the same moderate to high weekly alcohol amount, infrequent intake yielded higher pneumonia HRs than more regular intake in both sexes. Regular moderate alcohol intake is not associated with increased risk of hospitalisation for pneumonia. High weekly alcohol consumption in males and infrequent heavy drinking in both sexes may increase pneumonia risk.
PubMed ID
21659417 View in PubMed
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Antimalarials in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: a registry-based cohort study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268480
Source
Lupus. 2015 Mar;24(3):299-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
J C Nørgaard
K. Stengaard-Pedersen
M. Nørgaard
A. de Thurah
Source
Lupus. 2015 Mar;24(3):299-306
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adult
Antimalarials - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - drug therapy - epidemiology
Lupus Nephritis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Registries
Abstract
Evidence-based international guidelines for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) recommend treatment with antimalarials (AMs) for all patients with SLE irrespective of disease activity. Only a few studies have investigated the use of AMs among newly diagnosed patients with SLE.
The objective of this paper is to analyze prescription patterns of AMs in newly diagnosed SLE patients in Denmark from 2000 to 2011.
Using the Danish Prescription Register (DNPR), we conducted a nationwide cohort study including all patients with a first-time diagnosis of SLE (the Danish National Registry of Patients (NPR)). We used Kaplan-Meier estimates to compute the cumulative probability of starting AM treatment within a year and Cox regression analysis to compare time to treatment between patient groups.
AMs were prescribed to 37.7% of the newly diagnosed SLE patients within the first year of follow-up. Approximately 20% did not receive any medical treatment. Women were more likely than men to start AM (adjusted HR of 1.28 (95% CI 1.08-1.52)). Patients diagnosed with SLE between 2005 and 2011 were more likely to start treatment than patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2004 (HR of 1.21 (95% CI 1.07-1.36)). Patients with renal disease were less likely to start AM treatment than patients without this condition (adjusted HR of 0.50 (95% CI 0.36-0.68)). Current users of corticosteroids were more likely to start AM treatment than non-users (adjusted HR 1.81 (95% CI 1.59-2.06)).
Time to start of AM treatment following SLE diagnosis could be further reduced, especially among patients with renal disease. However, our results showed that treatment practice in recent years has changed toward initiating AM treatment earlier.
PubMed ID
25318969 View in PubMed
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Association between use of asthma drugs and prevalence of demarcated opacities in permanent first molars in 6-to-8-year-old Danish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98421
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;38(2):145-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
P. Wogelius
D. Haubek
A. Nechifor
M. Nørgaard
T. Tvedebrink
S. Poulsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aarhus University, Denmark. wog-fb@aalborg.dk
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;38(2):145-51
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - adverse effects
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dental Enamel Hypoplasia - chemically induced
Dentition, Permanent
Drug Information Services
Female
Glucocorticoids - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Molar - pathology
Odds Ratio
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Demarcated opacities in permanent first molars are common developmental tooth defects, characterized by areas with insufficient mineralization of the enamel. The defects present clinically as a continuum from creamy-white demarcated opacities, yellowish-brown demarcated opacities to macroscopic loss of tooth substance. The etiology is sparsely elucidated, but asthma drugs have been suspected to increase the prevalence. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of demarcated opacities in permanent first molars among 6-to-8-year-old children with prescriptions and without prescriptions for asthma drugs. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study in two Danish municipalities, all children aged 6-8 years (n = 891) were included. A total of 745 (83.6%) went through a dental examination during which demarcated opacities and tooth substance loss due to these were recorded. The analyses were restricted to 647 children in whom all four permanent first molars had erupted. Data on use of asthma drugs from birth until the time of the dental examination were obtained from a population-based pharmaco-epidemiological prescription database. RESULTS: Among 47 children with prescriptions for both inhaled beta(2)-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids before the age of 3 years, 15 (31.9%) had demarcated opacities of any type, and six children (12.8%) had opacity-related loss of tooth substance. Among 264 children with no prescriptions for either inhaled or oral asthma drugs from birth until the date of the dental examination, 96 (36.4%) had demarcated opacities of any type, and 13 (4.9%) had opacity-related loss of tooth substance. The odds ratio (OR) of any demarcated opacity, and of opacity-related loss of tooth substance in children with prescriptions for both inhaled beta(2)-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids before the age of 3 years was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.39-1.65), and 2.42 (95% CI: 0.70-7.43). CONCLUSIONS: Children with prescriptions for inhaled asthma drugs before the age of 3 years did not have an overall increased risk of demarcated opacities in first permanent molar but they seemed to have an increased risk of the severe demarcated opacities, i.e. opacities resulting in macroscopic loss of tooth substance, and possibly a need for restorative care.
PubMed ID
20059490 View in PubMed
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Comorbidity and performance status in acute myeloid leukemia patients: a nation-wide population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262736
Source
Leukemia. 2015 Mar;29(3):548-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
L S G Østgård
J M Nørgaard
H. Sengeløv
M. Severinsen
L S Friis
C W Marcher
I H Dufva
M. Nørgaard
Source
Leukemia. 2015 Mar;29(3):548-55
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Lung Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Remission Induction
Survival Analysis
Abstract
As the world population ages, the comorbidity burden in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients increases. Evidence on how to integrate comorbidity measures into clinical decision-making is sparse. We determined the prognostic impact of comorbidity and World Health Organization Performance Status (PS) on achievement of complete remission and mortality in all Danish AML patients treated between 2000 and 2012 overall and stratified by age. Comorbidity was measured using a modified version of the Charlson Comorbidity Index, with separate adjustment for pre-leukemic conditions. Of 2792 patients, 1467 (52.5%) were allocated to intensive therapy. Of these patients, 76% did not have any comorbidities, 19% had one comorbid disease and 6% had two or more comorbidities. Low complete remission rates were associated with poor PS but not with comorbidity. Surprisingly, among all intensive therapy patients, presence of comorbidity was not associated with an increased short-term mortality (adjusted 90 day mortality rate (MR)=1.06 (95% confidence interval (CI)=0.76-1.48)) and, if any, only a slight increase in long-term mortality (91 day-3 year adjusted MR=1.18 (95%CI=0.97-1.44). Poor PS was strongly associated with an increased short- and long-term mortality (adjusted 90 day MR, PS?2=3.43 (95%CI=2.30-5.13); adjusted 91 day-3 year MR=1.35 (95%CI=1.06-1.74)). We propose that more patients with comorbidity may benefit from intensive chemotherapy.
PubMed ID
25092141 View in PubMed
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Comorbidity and survival of Danish breast cancer patients from 1995 to 2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164299
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 May 7;96(9):1462-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-7-2007
Author
D P Cronin-Fenton
M. Nørgaard
J. Jacobsen
J P Garne
M. Ewertz
T L Lash
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Ole Worms Allé 1150, Aarhus C 8000, Denmark. dc@dce.au.dk
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 May 7;96(9):1462-8
Date
May-7-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Geography
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Registries
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
Comorbid diseases can affect breast cancer prognosis. We conducted a population-based study of Danish women diagnosed with a first primary breast cancer from 1995 to 2005 (n=9300), using hospital discharge registry data to quantify comorbidities by Charlson score. We examined the influence of comorbidities on survival, and quantified their impact on relative mortality rates. The prevalence of patients with a Charlson score='0' fell from 86 to 81%, with an increase in those with Charlson score='1-2' from 13 to 16%, and score='3+' from 1 to 2%. One- and five-year survival for patients with Charlson score='0' and '1-2' was better for those diagnosed in 1998-2000 than in 1995-1997. Overall, patients diagnosed in 2001-2004 (mortality ratio (MR)=0.80, 95% CI=0.68-0.95) and 1998-2000 (MR=0.92, 95% CI=0.78-1.09) had lower 1-year age-adjusted mortality compared to those diagnosed in 1995-1997 (reference period). Patients with Charlson scores '1-2' and '3+' had higher age-adjusted 1-year mortality than those with a Charlson score='0' in each time period (2001-2004: MR('1-2')=1.76, 95% CI=1.35-2.30, and MR('3+')=3.78, 95% CI=2.51-5.68; and 1998-2000: MR('1-2')=1.60, 95% CI=1.36-1.88 and MR('3+')=2.34, 95% CI=1.65-3.33). Similar findings were observed for 5-year age-adjusted mortality. Additional analyses, adjusted for stage, indicated that confounding by stage could not explain these findings. Despite continued improvements in breast cancer survival, we found a trend of poorer survival among breast cancer patients with severe comorbidities even after adjusting for age and stage. Such poorer survival is an important public health concern and can be expected to worsen as the population ages.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17406360 View in PubMed
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The data quality of haematological malignancy ICD-10 diagnoses in a population-based hospital discharge registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17011
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2005 Jun;14(3):201-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
M. Nørgaard
M V Skriver
H. Gregersen
G. Pedersen
H C Schønheyder
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. uxmeno@aas.nja.dk
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2005 Jun;14(3):201-6
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnostic Errors
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Hematologic Neoplasms - diagnosis - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Quality Control
Registries - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to estimate the data quality of haematological malignancy diagnoses in a hospital discharge registry, and to quantify the impact of any misclassification of diagnoses on survival estimates. We included all patients > or = 15 years living in North Jutland County, Denmark with a first-time discharge diagnosis of a haematological malignancy registered in the Hospital Discharge Registry and the Danish Cancer Registry, the reference standard, from 1994 to 1999. We estimated completeness and positive predictive value (PPV) of haematological malignancies and specific subcategories, as a measure of data quality, and compared mortality rates based on data from the two registries by Cox regression analysis. Completeness in the Hospital Discharge Registry for all haematological malignancies was 91.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) 89.6-93.1) and PPV was 84.5% (95% CI 82.2-86.5). Reviews of the pathological files showed misclassified cases in both registries and thus indicated that both completeness and PPV of the Hospital Discharge Registry were underestimates. Mortality rate ratio for all haematological malignancies when registered in the Hospital Discharge Registry compared with being registered in the Danish Cancer Registry was 0.98 (95% CI 0.88-1.09). Discharge data had some misclassifications but these had no major impact on survival estimates.
PubMed ID
15901987 View in PubMed
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[Development in the incidence of abortions in recent years. Investigations and calculations concerning the incidence of criminal abortions prior to and after the Danish abortion law of 1970]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66507
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1972 Nov 20;134(47):2493-505
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-1972

Emergency contraception: knowledge and use among Danish women requesting termination of pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63584
Source
Contraception. 2002 Dec;66(6):427-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
A. Perslev
C. Rørbye
H C Boesen
M. Nørgaard
L. Nilas
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynaecology, Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark.
Source
Contraception. 2002 Dec;66(6):427-31
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Contraception
Contraceptives, Postcoital
Denmark
Educational Status
Female
Gestational Age
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Parity
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe knowledge about and use of emergency contraception (EC) among Danish women requesting termination of pregnancy. The study included 1514 women (response rate 83.7%) referred during the period August 2000 to May 2001. Sufficient knowledge of EC was defined as knowledge about both the correct time limit and where to acquire the EC. We found adequate knowledge in 44.7%. These women were typically younger, better educated and more often singles, nulliparae, and users of contraception. No relation was found to the type of contraception used or to previous terminations of pregnancies. EC was used in the actual pregnancy by 6.6% and 24.1% had used it previously. Actual or formers users were characterized in the same way. The general knowledge about EC has not improved significantly during the last few years and there is still need for information about the correct use of EC.
PubMed ID
12499035 View in PubMed
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[FREQUENCY OF CONCEPTION AND THE COURSE OF PREGNANCY. RESEARCH AND CALCULATION OF THE INCIDENCE OF CRIMINAL ABORTION SINCE 1940.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67005
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1964 Mar 12;126:355-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-12-1964
Author
H. HOFFMEYER
M. NORGAARD
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1964 Mar 12;126:355-71
Date
Mar-12-1964
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Criminal
Abortion, Legal
Denmark
Fertilization
Population
Pregnancy
Statistics
PubMed ID
14139225 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.