Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Adverse experiences during treatment with zimeldine on special licence in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46553
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 1994;9(1):55-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
B O Bengtsson
B E Wiholm
M. Myrhed
J. Wålinder
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 1994;9(1):55-61
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - psychology
Drug Approval - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug Hypersensitivity - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neurologic Examination - drug effects
Zimeldine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Abstract
Adverse experiences during licensed treatment with the antidepressant serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor zimeldine in Sweden are presented. Data were obtained from a written inquiry of 694 patients and 67 reports to the Medical Products Agency. The spectrum of adverse symptoms was in agreement with those reported in previous studies on zimeldine. The most frequent adverse experiences were headache, nausea, myalgia, signs of liver function disturbance, arthralgia, neurological symptoms, fever and insomnia. No new case of the Guillain-Barré syndrome was found. The estimated frequency of the zimeldine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (HSS), comprising fever, myalgia and/or arthralgia and signs of liver function disturbance, ranged from 1.4% to 13% in the inquiry and from 0.63% to 3.4% in the report part of the study. Adverse experiences usually had a considerably higher incidence during the first 6 weeks of zimeldine treatment than thereafter. This is in agreement with the clinical experience that most of the adverse reactions occur early during zimeldine treatment. However, a number of adverse experiences did occur with a later onset. This may justify a prolongation of the compulsory 4 weeks' testing of liver function that is required during licensed treatment. There were significantly fewer patients who developed fever among the patients who had experienced previous zimeldine treatment than among those who had not. Otherwise there was no statistically significant difference in frequency of adverse symptoms between these two groups. Consequently zimeldine treatment per se does not seem to predispose to development of an HSS or other types of adverse reactions during subsequent therapy.
PubMed ID
8195584 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcoholic females. II. Causes of death with reference to sex difference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13143
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1977 Aug;56(2):81-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1977
Author
L. Dahlgren
M. Myrhed
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1977 Aug;56(2):81-91
Date
Aug-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adult
Alcoholism - complications - mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prognosis
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Suicide
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study has been to explore and compare the mortality of 100 female and 100 male alcoholics, admitted to a department of alcoholic diseases in 1963-69. The patients were early cases and mortality was studied during an observation period of 6-12 years. A total of 18 women and 16 men died. As compared with the general population, mortality was 5.6 and 3.0 times higher than expected for the women and men, respectively. Among the women a significant excess mortality was found for accidents, suicides, diseases of the respiratory system, and especially cirrhosis of the liver. Mortality among the men was significantly higher than expected due to suicides, diseases of the circulatory system, neoplasms, chronic alcoholism, and acute alcohol poisoning. The excess mortality from suicides found for both sexes was highest in the female group. Despite the hitherto rather small number of deaths in the two groups, the high frequency of cirrhosis of the liver among the women is striking.
PubMed ID
899846 View in PubMed
Less detail

Female alcoholics. I. Ways of admission of the alcoholic patient. A study special reference to the alcoholic female.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13149
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1977 Jul;56(1):39-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1977
Author
L. Dahlgren
M. Myrhed
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1977 Jul;56(1):39-49
Date
Jul-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Comparative Study
Emergency Services, Psychiatric
Female
Humans
Male
Medical History Taking
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Social Behavior
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study has been to describe the different ways in which 100 alcoholics of each sex sought treatment, with special reference to the females. In addition, some psychiatric and social characteristics of the two groups of patients are presented. A significantly higher number of the females were admitted as a result of an acute complication: unconsciousness, suicide attempt, confusion, neurological disorders, etc., while the males generally sought treatment under less dramatic circumstances. As the patients selected were early cases, most had not been treated before, but in those with previous in-patient psychiatric treatment a diagnosis without an alcohol connection was significantly more common among the women. Drug abuse was considerably more frequent among the female as compared with the male alcoholics, and the specific lonely drinking pattern was also more common among the women. A striking difference between the sexes appeared with respect to partner: more than one-half of the married women had alcoholic husbands. The corresponding figure for the married men amounted to about 10%.
PubMed ID
899842 View in PubMed
Less detail

Liver damage from flucloxacillin, cloxacillin and dicloxacillin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223902
Source
J Hepatol. 1992 May;15(1-2):154-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
R. Olsson
B E Wiholm
C. Sand
L. Zettergren
R. Hultcrantz
M. Myrhed
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine II, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
J Hepatol. 1992 May;15(1-2):154-61
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cholestasis - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Cloxacillin - adverse effects
Dicloxacillin - adverse effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug-Induced Liver Injury
Female
Floxacillin - adverse effects
Humans
Liver - drug effects - pathology
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
We describe a case of severe cholestatic liver disease, which persisted for 7 years, and was probably induced by flucloxacillin. We also report a survey of 77 liver reactions which were probably or possibly induced by penicillinase-resistant penicillins and spontaneously reported to the Swedish Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee. The reactions were usually cholestatic with a tendency to a protracted course. There is some evidence for an immunoallergic idiosyncratic reaction. The incidence of reported liver reactions was estimated from sales data to be 1.6-2.9 per million DDD (defined daily doses) or, for flucloxacillin 1:11,000-1:30,000 prescriptions. Female sex, age and high daily doses seemed to be associated with higher risk of liver reactions from flucloxacillin.
PubMed ID
1506634 View in PubMed
Less detail

Metformin-associated lactic acidosis in Sweden 1977-1991.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222136
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1993;44(6):589-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
B E Wiholm
M. Myrhed
Author Affiliation
Division of Drug Epidemiology, Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1993;44(6):589-91
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acidosis, Lactic - chemically induced - epidemiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Male
Metformin - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Since the withdrawal of phenformin in 1978, the use of metformin has increased from 13,500 to 22,000 patient years/year. During the period 1977-91 a total of 18 cases of metformin-associated acidosis was reported, of which 16 had lactic acidosis. The incidence of reported acidosis and lactic acidosis decreased from 1.50 cases per 10,000 patient years in 1977-81 to 0.24 cases per 10,000 patient years 1987-91, probably due to lower doses doses and reduced usage in the very old. All the reports described patients with several other concomitant diseases, mainly cardiovascular and renal, when the acidosis was diagnosed. It is important continuously to re-evaluate metformin therapy and to stop treatment at the onset of impaired renal or cardiovascular function.
PubMed ID
8405019 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nifedipine--a survey of adverse effects. Four years' reporting in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55643
Source
Acta Pharmacol Toxicol (Copenh). 1986;58 Suppl 2:133-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
M. Myrhed
B E Wiholm
Source
Acta Pharmacol Toxicol (Copenh). 1986;58 Suppl 2:133-6
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angina Pectoris - chemically induced
Confusion - chemically induced
Erythema - chemically induced
Female
Headache - chemically induced
Heart Failure, Congestive - chemically induced
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - chemically induced
Nifedipine - adverse effects
Sleep Disorders - chemically induced
Sweden
Tachycardia - chemically induced
Abstract
During the period February 1983 to December 1984 the Swedish Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee received 80 reports describing 116 adverse reactions with a possible or probable connection to nifedipine. The most frequently reported reactions are oedema, tachycardia, headache and rash. Confusion and sleep disorders constitute 8 cases. Impaired angina is a potentially serious reaction and one patient developed myocardial infarction.
PubMed ID
3716826 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.